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Indonesia is arguably the most important internet market in Southeast Asia as a result of its sheer size, emerging middle class, and digitally savvy population.

The annual global digital ecosystem report by We Are Social says Indonesia has 132.7 million internet users, which points to a penetration rate of 50% of the population. 130 million of these use some form of social media, showing how plugged in Indonesians are when it comes to documenting their lives online or using platforms like YouTube to consume content.

Source: We Are Social

With half of the Indonesian population still offline, there’s massive potential for ecommerce ventures, smartphone manufacturers, as well as brands building products to appeal to millennials in the country.

Other countries in Southeast Asia – Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines for example – may have higher internet penetration rates but their smaller populations can’t compete with Indonesia in terms of volume.

It’s these numbers that have forced investors to take notice.

study by Google and AT Kearney indicated that venture capital activity in Indonesia has grown 68X in the past five years, driven mainly by growing interest in ecommerce and ridesharing.

Total VC activity in the first eight months of 2017 was recorded at US$3 billion – more than double the number for the entirety of 2016, which was US$1.4 billion.

The same study predicted the volume of investments in Indonesia will continue to grow in the foreseeable future because VC investment as a percentage of GDP in Indonesia is actually lower than its Southeast Asian counterparts.

Source: Google / AT Kearney

What are Indonesians doing on the web?

Indonesian residents love the internet. 79% of survey respondents in the We Are Social report said they logged on to the web at least once a day. The average daily time spent online was almost 9 hours with approximately 5 hours dedicated to social media and streaming music.

Source: We Are Social

The majority of web traffic in Indonesia comes from mobile phones, facilitated by the availability of cheap smartphones to the Indonesian population coming online for the first time; sidestepping desktops and PCs directly.

Access to mobile has also caused excitement around fintech as only 36% of Indonesians possess bank accounts and only 3% have credit cards. If e-wallet platforms get it right, there are 125 million mobile internet users waiting for easy banking.

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Indonesians are also increasingly using the internet to embark on their product buying journeys. 45% of Indonesian netizens search online for a product or service to buy with a similar number landing on an online store and 40% make ecommerce transactions at least once a month.

Source: We Are Social

Fashion & beauty categories attract the highest amount of spend online, almost double that of electronics despite having a lower basket size than consumer appliances like mobile phones, cameras, and wearable gizmos.

It was estimated that Indonesians spent close to US$10.3 billion online in 2017.

Source: We Are Social

Dizzying statistics aside, the Indonesian market still has plenty of space to grow.

Expect heightened competition in the years to come as incumbents jostle for space and keep raising large war chests to outmuscle opponents. VCs, especially with an entrenched position in the market, can’t afford to back down now – there’s too much skin in the game for them to consider any hasty exits.

Recent developments already demonstrate how investors are taking a long-term view of the market. Alibaba injected over a billion dollars in local ecommerce marketplace Tokopedia last year. JD.com, Alibaba’s direct rival in China, has opened fulfillment ccenters across Indonesia with a view to keep expanding. And homegrown unicorn Go-Jek is rapidly transforming into a Wechat-esque ‘super app’ with users able to do everything from hail motorbikes to get their plumbing fixed, and pay for it via e-wallet.

What’s Pinduoduo?

Pinduoduo, or PDD, is a social commerce app founded by Colin Huang, an ex-Google engineer, in September 2015. Only a couple of years old, PDD has become the fastest growing ecommerce company in China. It raised $100 million in 2017, is backed by China’s Banyan Capital and Tencent, and valued at a whopping $1.5 billion.

Source: Crunchbase

As of Feb 21, 2018, PDD ranks #3 overall in the Chinese iTunes app store ranking for free apps, after popular apps like Tik Tok (Douyin) and WeChat, and ahead of other shopping apps like Taobao. PDD went from 100 million yuan ($16 million) GMV a month in early 2016 to 4 billion yuan ($630 million) GMV a month by 2017, putting it in fourth place behind Alibaba, JD and Vipshop.

How does Pinduoduo work?

Users can download the PDD app or access it within WeChat. Like any ecommerce platform, PDD offers products across a wide range of categories from food to fashion. However, unlike Tmall and JD, PDD incentivizes users with discounts to invite friends to buy in groups.

 

For example, one container of Similac Advance Infant Formula Powder costs 59 yuan if you buy alone but only 35.5 yuan if you can get one other person to buy it too. In the screenshot below, a total of 1,822 pairs have “group-purchased” this item already.

 

 

In addition to group discounts, PDD also incentivizes customer acquisition. Getting users to follow the PDD WeChat Official Account, install the app, and sign up via WeChat login will earn them free products.

PDD also offers cash red envelopes worth 5-20 yuan to users for each friend they get to download the app and register. The entire system is then gamified through a public leaderboard.

Wait, is this new? Didn’t Groupon invent social commerce?

Groupon did arguably pioneer the group buying concept. In its early days, a certain number of users had to sign up for the same deal in order for everyone to receive the voucher. But unlike PDD, there wasn’t a direct incentive; users had to sit back and wait for anonymous users to tip the scale.

This mechanism was quickly abandoned to scale faster with minimum thresholds that acted more like gimmicks.

Groupon was labeled “social commerce” at first but in its later years, lost its social aspect.

Source: wiredtech on Flickr.com

Let’s take a step back and look at the definition of social commerce, according to ConversionXl:

“Social commerce is defined as the ability to make a product purchase from a third-party company within the native social media experience.”

Groupon emerged in the pre-mobile age of 2008 when most consumers still transacted via desktop, especially in the company’s US home market. Back then, less than 1% of ecommerce transactions were via mobile acquisition channels.

In addition, the company’s main distribution channel was email newsletters, a slow and high-friction medium and payments weren’t seamless either as users relied on a credit card or PayPal.

Now looking at 2016 in China – PDD’s first full year in operation – WeChat is the country’s dominant “super app” and leading medium to socialize online with 889 million Monthly Active Users (MAUs) by year end.

71% of ecommerce now takes place on mobile, creating a flattering backdrop for the rapid rise of PDD, which started out as an app on WeChat.

Paying for products on PDD is also remarkably easy because the app makes it automatic. After the first payment, users can opt for one-click payment via WeChat Pay that don’t require passwords.

Desktop usage, clunky email newsletters, and credit card payments limited Groupon’s true social commerce potential. Where Groupon failed, PDD is succeeding because of an ecosystem of mobile-first users and WeChat’s features that make it a super app.

Will PDD come to Southeast Asia?

Why not? Southeast Asia ecommerce is already being carved up by Alibaba and Tencent. Lazada and Tokopedia, two companies owned and invested in by Alibaba, dominate the B2C and C2C space on one end and Tencent-invested JD, Shopee, and Go-Jek are on the other end.

With Southeast Asia’s horizontal ecommerce market being consolidated into a few properties like Lazada, Tokopedia, JD and Shopee, there isn’t as much opportunity in the space as before.

New ecommerce players have to focus on dominating a specific, vertical category or provide a competitive advantage through means other than outspending peers in advertising and/or coupon subsidies.

This is where a model like PDD fits snuggly.

It also helps that one of PDD’s biggest investors is Tencent, which already has its eyes set on the rapidly growing Southeast Asian market.

Will the PDD business model work in Southeast Asia?

To determine if the PDD model would work in the region, we need to identify the criteria that were conducive to its success in China:

1. Lack of distribution channels / expensive distribution channels

If you strip away all the hype, PDD’s competitive advantage is in its customer acquisition strategy. Instead of relying on expensive channels like display advertising or paid search (e.g. Baidu ads), PDD is paying its users to get more users. For example, CPCs alone on Baidu can range from 5 to 25 yuan. Note these are clicks, not even users acquired.

Southeast Asia (excl. Singapore and Malaysia) is very similar to China in terms of lack of channels, due to a similar “no-tail” ecosystem. Whereas entrepreneurs in China had to pick their poison between Baidu, Sina and Sohu back in the day, startups in emerging Southeast Asia are limited to Facebook Ads, Google Search, and portals like Detik in Indonesia and Sanook in Thailand.

Early entrants like Lazada took advantage of low cost-per-clicks (CPCs) back in 2013 but given the raging ecommerce “bloodbath”, online ad CPCs have gone through the roof.

Having saturated online channels, Lazada started exploring offline advertising channels like TV and out-of-home media.

Others like Pomelo Fashion tapped into physical stores as a more cost-efficient way to acquire users and simplify last-mile logistics.

PDD social and viral customer acquisition strategies could work quite well.

2. High mobile commerce penetration

The majority of ecommerce transactions in China now take place on mobile. In 2016, 71% of ecommerce GMV was on mobile. In the US, this number was only 20% in 2016.

In Southeast Asia, companies like Lazada and Shopee today see over 65% of their orders coming from mobile (with 21.6% using both mobile and desktop to shop), according to a recent survey by ecommerceIQ.

Needless to say, high mobile penetration in Southeast Asia along with high mobile ecommerce usage will provide a fertile ground for a business model like PDD to gain traction here.

3. Frictionless mobile payments

One of the drivers of PDD’s success is its seamless payments through WeChat Pay.

This will be a challenge for PDD in Southeast Asia as only Singapore and Malaysia are credit card dominated whereas the rest of the region is mainly a cash-on-delivery market.

Source: ecommerceIQ

Despite efforts to come up with a universal mobile payment standard, no one has succeeded as of today. Efforts like Sea’s AirPay, Ascend’s True Pay, and LINE Pay have hit a wall due to lack of distribution, lack of use case, and a plethora of other issues.

Right now, most eyes are on Go-Jek’s Go-Pay, which has a massive distribution channel by leveraging Go-Jek’s 40 million install base and 10 million Weekly Active Users (WAUs). In addition, and more importantly, Go-Jek addresses emerging Southeast Asia’s unique lack of both credit card and bank account penetration — users are able to top up their Go-Pay accounts by handing cash to Go-Jek drivers that essentially act like mobile ATM deposit machines.

While still a poor-man’s WeChat Pay, Go-Pay offers hope for business models like that of PDD to thrive in Southeast Asia.

4. Attachment to popular social platform

Without the WeChat ecosystem, PDD wouldn’t have been the company it is today. Being embedded in WeChat, PDD was able to quickly get massive distribution by tapping into the potential 889 million MAUs of WeChat.

In Southeast Asia, Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp, and LINE are highly popular, however, none are considered super apps that offer seamless integration.

The closest to WeChat in Southeast Asia would probably be Indonesia’s Go-Jek.

While Go-Jek hasn’t entered ecommerce yet (it’s positioned only as a services marketplace and offers delivery for partners through its GO-MART product), it wouldn’t be surprising if PDD decided to leverage the Go-Jek platform, given the similarities to WeChat in China. Like PDD, Go-Jek also counts Tencent as an investor.

With an estimated third of ecommerce in markets like Thailand happening on Facebook, Instagram and LINE, the user behavior of buying through social channels already exists.

5. Access to cheap product sourcing

If you browse through PDD, you’ll notice that most of the products sold bear similarities to many of those sold on Taobao. In other words, a lot of “mass” and non-branded products. PDD thrives in China because of easy access to a supply of these products manufactured locally.

However, in Southeast Asia, these kind of products (typically sold on social media and C2C platforms) are imported from China, which leaves less margin for PDD to play with in terms of discounts and customer acquisition.

To sum up, emerging Southeast Asia meets several of the criteria behind PDD’s success in China but poses some unique challenges:
ecommerceIQ

What will happen next?

In the analysis, we’ve identified some of the drivers of PDD’s rapid rise in China and also their presence in emerging Southeast Asian markets at an earlier stage.

Given this opportunity, we can expect the following scenarios to play out over the next few months and years:

1. Local and Chinese entrepreneurs will launch PDD clones across the region

Ever since opening up to the world in the 80s, we can describe China having gone through the following three stages, with the third one still progressing as we speak:

1. Made-in-China (1980-2000)

China perceived as manufacturing base for (often cheap, low-quality) export products

2. Copy-to-China (2000-2015)

Chinese entrepreneurs, some foreign educated, bring back models that worked in the US, e.g. Search (Google -> Baidu), Portals (Yahoo -> Sina, Sohu)

3. Copy-from-China (2015-2030)

Birth of unique Chinese Internet business models (e.g. bike-sharing, payments, live streaming, social commerce, O2O). Increasing media focus on Chinese tech innovation and locals outside of China looking for Chinese models to copy

We are witnessing stage 3 happening right here in Southeast Asia. Below is a Thai post on Facebook looking to recruit staff to work on what looks like a PDD clone:

It doesn’t have to be local talent copying PDD from China to Southeast Asia. With the influx of Alibaba, Tencent and JD into the region, there are plenty of Chinese employees who’ll be noticing the similarities between Southeast Asia today and China, and jump on new opportunities.

2. PDD will enter Indonesia through Go-Jek (helped by common investor Tencent)

If PDD were to follow Alibaba and Tencent’s steps and enter Southeast Asia, we expect them to join forces with Go-Jek. By embedding itself inside Go-Jek, PDD is executing the same game plan that led to its rapid initial growth within the WeChat ecosystem. Fostered by a shared investor — Tencent — Go-Jek would be the perfect launch partner for PDD in Southeast Asia.

3. Existing players will adopt the PDD business model to compete against horizontal ecommerce plays

Local ecommerce players like MatahariMall, Konvy, and Orami could pre-empt PDD by adopting its customer acquisition strategies to compete with regional giants like Lazada and Shopee.

For Konvy and Orami, two female-focused ecommerce platforms, this move could make a lot of sense since the majority of PDD’s users in China are female, over 40 year old, and living in smaller cities.

Play on players.

As the fastest growing industry in one of the world’s fastest growing markets, the evolution of Southeast Asia’s ecommerce landscape means new players and a lot of consolidation since last year’s first ECOMScape series by ecommerceIQ.

This year’s new edition of the ECOMScapes kicks off with Indonesia.

Expected to capture the biggest chunk of the $200 billion ecommerce opportunity in Southeast Asia, it’s easy to see why Chinese giants like Alibaba, JD, and Tencent have rigorously left their home-market to tackle Indonesia. What has happened over a span of only one year?

1. Chinese Companies are Hungry

Out of the total $3 billion investment put into Indonesia startups in the first eight months of 2017, 94% of the funding came from Chinese investors.

News regarding Alibaba leading a $1.1 billion investment in Tokopedia created excitement in the industry, especially because JD was rumored to also make a bid for the popular local marketplace.

Indonesia startups investment

Although that opportunity passed, it hasn’t stopped JD from participating in the funding round of Indonesia’s two other unicorns, ride-hailing app Go-Jek and online travel booking platform Traveloka. Chinese giant Tencent also joined the round for Go-Jek.

2. Natural Selection: A Race to the Bottom

As the market in Indonesia saturates, in both players and investment, it’s only a matter of time before natural selection weeds out the weaker companies (especially those with shallow pockets).

The past year has seen several ecommerce companies in Indonesia either shutting down or pivoting business models, and investors pulling out before stakes become worthless. And don’t think it’s only happening to the small fish.

Some cases? Alfacart and Elevenia.

Earlier this year, Indonesian convenience store chain Alfacart announced its decision to ditch the marketplace model after a continual lag behind e-marketplaces like Lazada and MatahariMall.

Launched in 2013, Elevenia is the joint venture of telco companies XL Axiata and Korea’s SK Planet. Despite claims that Elevenia has seen positive growth over the years, it’s a telling sign when both companies pull out and sell their stake to Indonesia’s conglomerate group Salim.

Even the ecommerce arm of large telco company Indosat, Cipika, shut down in June citing unprofitable business model and high cash burn rate as reasons.

Indonesia ecommerce landscape

With JD and Alibaba investing directly in local companies, it’s not a stretch to expect fewer names on the ECOMScape next year.

3. Marketplace Competition Heats Up

If this time last year Tokopedia was focused on growing its core C2C business, the Indonesian marketplace has long since been strong arming its shift to B2C as signaled by Unilever’s official store opening on the platform.

The move is already serious competition to Lazada, especially as the two ecommerce companies interchangeably grab the top spot in web traffic in Indonesia (which is probably why Alibaba invested in both companies).

Indonesia’s top C2C players have been moving into the B2C space i.e. Tokopedia. Traffic of ecommerce websites compiled by ecommerceIQ. Find more here.

Sea’s backed Shopee has also opened its platform for brands as it launched Shopee Mall that claimed to offer over 500 brands.

The shift from C2C to B2C is a natural progression as companies attempt to increase revenue and leverage their already large customer bases.

4. Having Fintech is for “Cool Kids” But the Nerds Will Win

While payments still remain a pain point in Indonesia ecommerce even though multiple companies released their own e-wallets last year, the country and the region potentially, might finally have a real solution.

Both Kudo and Kioson are arming micro-entrepreneurs and business owners such as mom-and-pop shops in rural areas with their digital platform to empower them to act as the bridge between ecommerce companies and rural citizens.

The O2O (online-to-offline) concept clearly has some merit, as both companies attracted investor attention and made headlines in 2017. Kudo was acquired by Grab and Kioson raised $3.3 million as the first tech company to IPO on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX).

Kioson during its IPO in October 5, raising $3.3 million. Source: Kioson.

Indonesian startup darling Go-Jek is also leveraging its millions of users by launching its own mobile wallet, GoPay, which has real potential to become the WeChat of Indonesia.

GoPay’s usability has improved from payment for rides to also allowing peer-to-peer (P2P) transfers and making the order of food, groceries, tickets, and beauty treatments extremely easy in one app.


Are we missing any key players? Let us know via Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter

Download ECOMScape Indonesia 2017 here.

Featured image credit: Martha Suherman

With the boom of technology in the region, Southeast Asia has become home to young startups, and investors hoping to help fuel its rapid growth.

Some examples of investment news surrounding the region only this year include Chinese ecommerce giant JD.com confirming a $500 million joint venture with Thai retailer Central to build up the ecommerce and fintech sector in Thailand; Malaysia Debt Ventures set aside a $238 million fund to target technology-based companies like AR, VR, etc; and 500 Startups has made its debut investment in Myanmar backing a social media monitoring and news discovery app.

A recent report commissioned by Google and AT Kearney also highlights just how much money has been funneled into the region, which market is the most attractive and where are the most deep-pocketed investors coming from.

Southeast Asia’s golden child

Although the investment for startup companies in Southeast Asia only contributed to 8% to the total $90 billion of investment into Asia, this value has grown 23 times from 2012 to 2016 from $0.3 billion to $6.8 billion.

Most of the money has been pumped into Singapore and Indonesia that captured 60% of the entire investment.

Indonesia startups investment

Singapore gained most of the startup investment in Southeast Asia

However, nothing shone brighter this year than the myriad of Indonesian startups that have been stealing the attention of global industry giants like Tencent, Expedia, and Tim Draper from Draper Associates who invested in the early days of Tesla, Baidu, and Skype.

The country has produced three startups that classify as a ‘unicorn’, a company valued at more than $1 billion. They are Traveloka, Tokopedia and Go-Jek.

The first is valued at $2 billion after a $350 million investment from Expedia in July, and both Tokopedia and Go-Jek also are worth around $1 billion and $3 billion respectively.

Where’s all the money coming from?

Attracting the Chinese investors

In a short span of four years time from 2012 to 2016, Indonesia has seen 31 times growth of investment value from $44 million to $1.4 billion. During 8 months in this year alone, this value has grown more than two times to $3 billion driven by later-stage investments.

Indonesia startups investment

The staggering growth has AT Kearney predicting the ecosystem could attract more investment than the oil and gas industry — which contributed $23.7 billion or 3.3% of the country’s GDP last year.

“Due to the massive growth, the value of startup investments in Indonesia may surpass the nation’s oil and gas investment which was $5 billion in 2016,” said AT Kearney partner, Alessandro Gazzini.

From all of the investment raised by Indonesian startups since 2012, ecommerce received the biggest chunk of gold taking 58% of the total investment value.

Transport and fintech quickly follow behind with 38% and 2% respectively.

Indonesia startups investment

Indonesia has also become a hotbed for the expansion of Chinese companies as the country sees a growing interest from Chinese investors this year.

94% of the startups investment in the country during 2017 have involved Chinese investors, up from only 2% last year. Two of the infamous Chinese BAT, Alibaba and Tencent, are raising stake in Indonesia by investing in Tokopedia and Go-Jek respectively.

Meanwhile, JD.com diversified its portfolios with investment in Traveloka making Indonesia the official battleground for Chinese companies to fight their proxy war.

Indonesia startups investment

The involvement of Chinese investors in Indonesia is something that the government has encouraged across all sectors. Indonesia’s Investment Coordinating has even set up a special China desk to attract more investors.

With the country still at a nascent digital stage, there is no precise measurement to find out the country’s true potential until company’s try but as the famed venture capitalist Tim Draper said about Indonesia, “it is a great place to be”.

Marilyn Monroe once sang, “diamonds are a girl’s best friend” and it seems to be ringing true as Indonesia’s fine jewelry sales grew 13% from 2015 to 2016 reaching $1.57 million, according to Euromonitor.

The country’s upper-middle class households are expected to more than double by 2030 and the current existing 1.5 million are creating demand for gold, silver and metal combinations growing annually 7.8% until 2021 making Indonesia the fastest-growing in the world for jewelry sales.

Indonesia Jewelry Market

Model showcasing products at Orori event in Indonesia.

“Jewelry is part of the culture during wedding and childbirth [celebrations] for people in eastern Indonesia,” said president director Sandra Sunarto in Bandung, West Java. “They are more interested in buying heavier [jewelry] made of higher carats.”

It’s not difficult then to understand why George Budi Sumantri, CEO and founder of Indonesian online jeweler Orori, shut down his family’s offline business to focus on ecommerce in 2012 after taking over in 2003.

ecommerceIQ conducted an email interview with the founder to discover why and how he decided to sell a high AOV product in a country that is still skeptical about shopping online.

Pioneering jewelry trading online

At the time Sumantri decided to close down his offline operations, 80% of the company’s revenue came from its stores spread across Jakarta’s shopping centers.

While an extremely risky move, he believed that moving operations online would save the company money previously spent on sitting inventory and rental costs.

Within a year, the company racked up $1.3 million in revenue and as of 2017, Orori claims to have 2 million consumers and processing thousand of transactions per month.

Global sales of personal accessories are growing at 2%, internet retailing is experiencing double-digit growth. – Euromonitor 2016

“Yes, there are still people who like to shop in a physical store, but when you look closely at the urban population; young couples who plan to get married and the young people who are looking for Mother’s Day gifts, [they] love the practicality and ease of access that ecommerce offers,” said Sumantri.

As newly middle class female Indonesian consumers become savvier about her shopping prowess, she cares about choice—not just price and promotions.

Leaving no space for distrust

A common question asked by many skeptics remains, how do you sell a product with a high average order volume to a market that only began going online?

A quick browse through the site shows that wedding rings can start at roughly $220 and reach $6,000 depending on the carat and diamond cut.

Orori made sure consumers had no reason to doubt its reliability by arming the platform with certain features to ease the minds of shoppers.

For example, all of Orori’s more than 35,000 diamonds are certified by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and each have a complete description along with product specifications.

The best way to merchandise premium categories to the discriminating Indonesian shopper is to visibly show price tags to aid comparison spending – Nielsen

For first time buyers, they can read the company’s blog OROREADS, to access online guides for buying jewelry, including how to select the right finger size, caring for fine jewelry and choosing a diamond size.

Still not convinced? The company offers a 100% money back guarantee and various payment options such as bank instalments, cashback, and a ‘buy now pay later’ programme that allows consumers to pay 30 days after they made the order.

For any stragglers with doubts, they can chat with an Orori agent, a feature that can increase conversions up to 6.3 times.

Indonesia Jewelry Market

Orori live chat offered on the website to answer questions regarding its high AOV products.

By providing all of these services, the company is hoping to encourage people to buy jewelry online as per the company’s tagline ‘Jewelry for Everyone’.

On its way to make the region sparkle 

Originally set to sell its own line of jewelry, Orori has since changed its business model to a marketplace to offer a variety of brands on its platform. Right now, the company has seven jewelers on its platform.

Sumantri targets Orori to reach $25 million of GMV in 2019 with annual transactions of 80,000.

The company also plans to move beyond the B2C sector and launch C2C and C2B (consumer-to-business) features by the end of the year. In addition to these aggressive targets, Orori has regional expansion plans starting with Singapore.

“The marketplace [model] will not only change consumer behavior about buying jewelry online, but will also help reputable brands in the industry extend their business beyond just brick-and-mortar,” said Sumantri.

Indonesia Jewelry Market

Orori CEO and founder George Budi Sumantri

Featured image credit: Leeviahan

Here’s what you should know:

1. Indonesia’s ecommerce transactions reach $5.6 billion in 2016

Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo revealed that ecommerce transactions in the country amounted to $5.6 billion in 2016.

The immense growth potential of digital economy in the country was also indicated by 78% growth of the fintech industry in the last two years.

However, many things needed to be addressed to make business online more efficient. Internet penetration rate in Indonesia is still low if compared to neighbour countries. According to Statista, there 24.74 million of internet users in Indonesia.

Read the full story here

2. Amazon has joined Tencents to back new smartphone brand created by ex-Googler

Amazon has joined major Asian companies in backing Essential, the startup co-founded by Android-creator Andy Rubin that’s getting ready to sell a new smartphone.

Tencent and Foxconn Group took part in a $300 million funding round for Essential alongside Amazon’s Alexa Fund and Access Technology Ventures. Other backers included Redpoint Ventures, Altimeter Capital and Vy Capital.

Essential is looking to break into the increasingly competitive field of consumer electronics. The startup is said to be valued at $900 million to $1 billion.

Read the full story here.

3. Singapore DBS Bank launches online car portal

DBS Bank entered the car sales industry with the launch of its online consumer marketplace for car buyers and sellers dubbed as DBS Car Marketplace.

The move came after the Monetary Authority of Singapore’s (MAS) announcement to make it easier for banks to invest in non-financial sector.

Partnering with other car marketplaces sgCarMart and Carro, sellers who use DBS’ platform will be able to list on both marketplace for free.

Read the full story here.

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