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ecommerceIQ, together with Sasin SEC, created the Leadership Ecommerce Accelerator Program (LEAP) to provide the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to successfully run an ecommerce business in the world’s fastest-growing market.

While buying search keywords and having attractive content are almost crucial for modern-day marketing, quite often companies ignore an equally important aspect of content marketing/communications – Public Relations.

During this week’s class, lecturers unveiled effective ways to increase brand awareness using the media with ‘smart’ communications and how to achieve positive unit economics.

1. Treat media relations like dating

CYNTHIA LUO, ACOMMERCE HEAD OF COMMUNICATIONS AND ECOMMERCEIQ PRODUCT MANAGER

Not all companies can afford to have a communications team but this doesn’t mean they should neglect  “free publicity”. According to Cynthia,

“You, the executives, are the walking-talking mascots of the brand. If I run a Google search for your name, what does the audience learn about you?”

LEAP startup course

Cynthia Luo, aCommerce Head of Communications and ecommerceIQ Product Manager

To make things easier, she compared the procedure of creating a relationship with a media to dating and baseball games.

  • Home Base: Similar to dating, you want to get to know the person that will be eventually writing about you. With journalists, introduce yourself by reaching out on Twitter or email, something as simple as complimenting their work. Twitter remains a popular social media platform among journalists.
  • First Base: Establish meaningful conversation. It can be done by finding out what the journalist is interested in, tweet interesting articles to them and ask for their opinions.
  • Second Base: Getting “physical”. With journalists, initiate a meet up, this can include a media visit to your office and/or a press event. This is also where a press release with newsworthy news should be shared.

Below are some headlines that typically make news:

LEAP startup course

  • Third Base: In romantic relationships, it can be healthy to be exclusive. When your news is published, make sure you don’t damage the relationship with the media you created.

Common mistakes that would irritate journalists include spamming their inbox, using an unnecessary amount of buzzwords, and a delayed response to requests for comments.

2. Positive unit economics is the only way to be profitable

MICHAEL CLUZEL, EATIGO CO-FOUNDER AND CEO

As a marketer, economist and founder of the popular dining application, eatigo, Michael doesn’t believe in businesses that don’t profit.

LEAP startup course

Michael Cluzel, eatigo co-founder and CEO

It’s common for a startup to depend on investors for financial injections but a startup should eventually be able to survive on their own if they choose to ‘break free from the aquarium’.

“Startups need to be independent from investors. Instead of relying on external financial sources, create your own source of income and be profitable.”

How? Ensure that Lifetime Value (LTV) is higher than Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) is reduced.

LEAP startup course

3. Student case studies

SHEJI HO, ACOMMERCE GROUP CMO

The insurance sector in Thailand is the second largest in the Asean Economic Community, and accounted for 5.5% of GDP in 2016. However, direct premiums purchased through online channels have a YoY growth of 25% in 2016.

The students wanted to know how could they launch financial services online successfully and  what kind of marketing tools could be best leveraged?

According to Sheji, the real opportunity in this industry lies within the product, not distribution channels.

LEAP startup course

Sheji Ho, aCommerce Group CMO

The local market is already saturated and mature with many fintech players moving into the space. What is missing is actually the innovation of insurance products and pricing.

LEAP startup course

“There is wide open space to disrupt this industry as you can create micro-insurance products to sell online.”

Traditional companies should look to China for examples of different types of financial products such as insurance for kidnapping, mobile phones, ecommerce returns, etc.

The next class in the 10-week program is on Thursday October 12th and will take a look at the fundamentals of app marketing, as well as learning from an omni-channel case study of Central Online. Stay tuned for next week’s takeaways!

[LEAP Week 1] eIQ Insights: The New Ecommerce Opportunity in Thailand

[LEAP Week 2] eIQ Insights: Refinement of an Ecommerce Channel Strategy

[LEAP Week 3] eIQ Insights: Market-Product Fit First Before Anything

[LEA{ Week4] eIQ Insights: Central Marketing Group’s Shares Phase II of Digital Strategy

The first thing that comes to a consumer’s mind when asked about virtual reality (VR) often involves gaming.

Why? Because virtual reality is used to describe a three-dimensional, computer-generated environment that can be explored by a person. That person is immersed in a space where they are able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

The virtual reality technology buzz, whether in content or hardware, is projected to be worth $80 billion by 2025 globally, while gaming unsurprisingly will make up the largest share of an estimated value of $11.6 billion.

But the application of virtual reality is not limited to only video games. According to Jirayod Theppipit, CEO and Founder of Infofed, a VR content development startup, virtual reality can be used as a marketing strategy in almost every area.

“Dare we say that virtual reality is the future of content? The experience VR offers can solve the pain points of businesses in almost every industry.”

“People often associate virtual reality with gaming and we can’t blame them. Consumers in the gaming segment have the ability to afford new technology and gadgets,” continues Jirayod. “This is why they’ve adopted virtual reality before others.”

Instead of scrambling to compete in an already crowded gaming market overtaken by virtual reality gaming content creators like VRX, Infofed sees a blue ocean in real estate for virtual reality content in Thailand.

“I know this technology is going to take off because big players like Facebook and Google have already jumped into it.”

Two years ago, Facebook invested $2 billion into VR technology to promote its own VR headset Oculus and only earlier this year, Apple launched ‘ARKit’ to turn its iPhones and iPads into AR/VR (Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality) devices.

IKEA has already jumped on board with its new app, IKEA Place.

IKEA ecommerce

The highly affluential Chinese shoppers have also taken a liking to VR based on a survey by Worldpay, which has been a strong indicator of how content will be consumed in the future.

Phil Pomford, General Manager for Asia Pacific at Worldpay, says,

“China is blazing a trail for VR/AR adoption and showing other Asia Pacific markets what the future could look like…with China leading the way, Asian businesses should start investigating the future of VR/AR technology now, so that they’re ready to meet consumer demands as and when they arise.”

84% of 16,000 consumers surveyed across Asia Pacific believe that AR/VR is the future of shopping, 92% say they’d like to see more retail apps make use of AR/VR – Worldpay.

But for a nascent market like Thailand, can virtual reality successfully take off?

Infofed believes it already has.

ecommerceIQ speaks with Jirayod to understand how the two-year old startup has utilized VR in industries like tourism and education and what it has learned from its latest project, real estate.

Giving a slow-moving industry an upgrade

The current real estate industry in Thailand is experiencing slowing growth but the number of new condominium units are set to rise 15% from 2016.

To sell units, typical marketing tools often include flashy brochures with heavily photoshopped photos and miniature models in an attempt to give homebuyers a glimpse of the expensive home they should buy.

Higher-end real-estate developers will also set up a physical showroom for visitors to experience the ambience of the unit, but this requires travel and more effort than today’s digitalized world is used to.

Virtual Reality Infofed

The Deck, project by Sansiri. Source: Sansiri

“Because my background is in architecture, I can understand the blueprints and engineering language that the marketing material contains but there are many people who are confused by it. The current content in brochures and on websites aren’t extremely helpful for consumers who want to properly ‘experience’ the product.”

Through VR content, Infofed believes that its content can help developers market its products to consumers. What better way for someone to experience their new home than to actually walk through it?

The company has already worked together with Nirvana Property, one of the leading developers in Thailand, to showcase its showroom through virtual reality content.

 

Virtual Reality Infofed

Virtual reality Showroom for Nirvana Rama 2 by Infofed

Consumers are able to view the showroom in 360 degrees, simply through their electronic devices without the need of a virtual reality headset.

According to Jirayod, consumers on average spend up to five minutes viewing a VR showroom whereas they spend no more than two minutes flipping through a brochure.

“The longer consumers spend on our content, the more interest they develop in the product and reflects on a higher rate of purchase.”

The appeal of VR can also save real estate companies money to build and dismantle their showrooms – especially in trade shows and exhibitions. From Jirayod’s past architectural experience, building a showroom has an average cost of $60K for condominiums and $200K for houses.

Creating VR content, on the other hand, can start as low as $1,500 at Infofed according to Jirayod.

New age but in demand

Despite North America being the current leader in VR content market with a share of 73.4% in 2016, Asia Pacific is forecasted to exhibit higher growth.

Transparency Market Research has forecasted that this region will see an exponential CAGR of 116.1% between 2016 and 2024.

Virtual Reality Infofed

But in order to capture the opportunity VR presents, Infofed is committed to educating Thai consumers about new technology and training the people necessary to create VR content. One way it has done so is by creating content for influential industry players like the Tourism Authority of Thailand and leading real estate companies.

“It’s important that we help create build an ecosystem for virtual reality content. I have never viewed other virtual reality players as competitors but instead as partners to together push this technology out.”

Infofed has also brought in experts from the US through partnerships to equip its local staff with sufficient virtual reality knowledge to produce content. It’s also sharing its own experiences at top universities to educate the incoming digital-savvy workforce.

Virtual Reality Infofed

Infofed Team

All of the company’s efforts come down to one goal – to make Thailand a virtual reality society, even if it’s not fully ready now.

With the boom of technology in the region, Southeast Asia has become home to young startups, and investors hoping to help fuel its rapid growth.

Some examples of investment news surrounding the region only this year include Chinese ecommerce giant JD.com confirming a $500 million joint venture with Thai retailer Central to build up the ecommerce and fintech sector in Thailand; Malaysia Debt Ventures set aside a $238 million fund to target technology-based companies like AR, VR, etc; and 500 Startups has made its debut investment in Myanmar backing a social media monitoring and news discovery app.

A recent report commissioned by Google and AT Kearney also highlights just how much money has been funneled into the region, which market is the most attractive and where are the most deep-pocketed investors coming from.

Southeast Asia’s golden child

Although the investment for startup companies in Southeast Asia only contributed to 8% to the total $90 billion of investment into Asia, this value has grown 23 times from 2012 to 2016 from $0.3 billion to $6.8 billion.

Most of the money has been pumped into Singapore and Indonesia that captured 60% of the entire investment.

Indonesia startups investment

Singapore gained most of the startup investment in Southeast Asia

However, nothing shone brighter this year than the myriad of Indonesian startups that have been stealing the attention of global industry giants like Tencent, Expedia, and Tim Draper from Draper Associates who invested in the early days of Tesla, Baidu, and Skype.

The country has produced three startups that classify as a ‘unicorn’, a company valued at more than $1 billion. They are Traveloka, Tokopedia and Go-Jek.

The first is valued at $2 billion after a $350 million investment from Expedia in July, and both Tokopedia and Go-Jek also are worth around $1 billion and $3 billion respectively.

Where’s all the money coming from?

Attracting the Chinese investors

In a short span of four years time from 2012 to 2016, Indonesia has seen 31 times growth of investment value from $44 million to $1.4 billion. During 8 months in this year alone, this value has grown more than two times to $3 billion driven by later-stage investments.

Indonesia startups investment

The staggering growth has AT Kearney predicting the ecosystem could attract more investment than the oil and gas industry — which contributed $23.7 billion or 3.3% of the country’s GDP last year.

“Due to the massive growth, the value of startup investments in Indonesia may surpass the nation’s oil and gas investment which was $5 billion in 2016,” said AT Kearney partner, Alessandro Gazzini.

From all of the investment raised by Indonesian startups since 2012, ecommerce received the biggest chunk of gold taking 58% of the total investment value.

Transport and fintech quickly follow behind with 38% and 2% respectively.

Indonesia startups investment

Indonesia has also become a hotbed for the expansion of Chinese companies as the country sees a growing interest from Chinese investors this year.

94% of the startups investment in the country during 2017 have involved Chinese investors, up from only 2% last year. Two of the infamous Chinese BAT, Alibaba and Tencent, are raising stake in Indonesia by investing in Tokopedia and Go-Jek respectively.

Meanwhile, JD.com diversified its portfolios with investment in Traveloka making Indonesia the official battleground for Chinese companies to fight their proxy war.

Indonesia startups investment

The involvement of Chinese investors in Indonesia is something that the government has encouraged across all sectors. Indonesia’s Investment Coordinating has even set up a special China desk to attract more investors.

With the country still at a nascent digital stage, there is no precise measurement to find out the country’s true potential until company’s try but as the famed venture capitalist Tim Draper said about Indonesia, “it is a great place to be”.

The name Dara Khosrowshahi has been everywhere in the news lately. Why? The Expedia CEO of 12 years has officially confirmed reports that he will be joining Uber as its new CEO.

The ride-hailing platform has had its fair share and sometimes self-inflicted misfortunes. In Southeast Asia alone, it is under high scrutiny from the Thai transport authorities calling for a crackdown, it recently paid $9.6 million in fines after the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board in the Philippines banned it, and is going up against Grab, the region’s unicorn soon to close an investment round of $2.5 billion backed by Toyota, Softbank, and Didi Chuxing.

Who is Mr. Khosrowshahi and what does he bring to one of the world’s most valuable and troubled startups?

A great answer was shared by angel investor Terrence Yang, excerpt below:

In a perfect world, Uber would just hire Sheryl Sandberg. But in the real world, there’s no way Sheryl would ever join Uber. If you were Sheryl, would you? Becoming Uber CEO poses massive downside risk and and only moderate upside for Sheryl.

Among other things, former CEO Travis Kalanick keeps meddling/trying to come back, Uber has massive problems with recruitment and retention, Uber is highly unprofitable and probably needs (not wants) driverless cars to happen sooner than later to make the economics work (but Alphabet’s Waymo is suing Uber for, shall we say, inappropriately appropriating and basically colluding with Lewandowski to steal Waymo’s self-driving tech).

Here’s what’s great about Dara:

  • Dara is a grown-up Travis. Like Travis, Dara was and remains ruthless, smart, tough. But unlike Travis, Dara developed empathy and soft skills that Travis failed to do for years. Dara is also much more humble and learns fast, including learning soft skills.
  • Travis was the right person to lead Uber when he did. Uber was the fastest growing big startup company in the world by some measures. It’s a truly impressive accomplishment. Travis will go down in history for that. But Travis also went down – because Travis never evolved. Dara did. That’s why Dara is the best realistic choice for Uber.
  • Jeff Immelt and Meg Whitman just don’t know much about the travel industry. I don’t see how leading GE, eBay or HP is very relevant to leading Uber. Dara’s experience is much more relevant (and, no, you are not going to be able to hire the CEO of Lyft right now).
  • Dara bought HomeAway, which competes with Airbnb. Expedia also tried to compete with Airbnb directly. Airbnb is a good model of how to technically violate laws (e.g. turning homes into hotels) without pissing off so many people. Unlike Uber. And Dara is even an investor in freight startup Convoy. Uber is trying to make UberFreight a success.
  • Dara started as an investor in Expedia and CFO of that investor. Benchmark is suing Travis in part over Uber’s lack of CFO.
  • Dara learned to be a great CEO of Expedia. He’s been ranked in the top 100 CEOs in 2015 and 2016. Expedia stock and revenues are doing great.

Southeast Asian startups need…adults?

The lack of experienced digital professionals, coined the talent challenge, has always been a looming backdrop to the bustling nature of startups, especially in emerging markets like Southeast Asia. As long as someone was able to get the job done, they were hired. Age was just a number.

But given the growth of these companies from a team of 10 to 300 in the span of a few short months, businesses need leadership and maturity, two things that usually stem from experience. This is not to say that older means better but that a great leader is able to recognize what a company needs at Stage 1 is completely different than what it needs at Stage 3 and willing to implement the necessary changes.

Dara Khosrowshahi Humility

Source: Medium, Al Doan

Given the 48-year old’s track record leading Expedia to become “one of the largest online travel companies in the world” and positive reviews by Expedia senior execs, it isn’t surprising that 93% of employees told company review site Glassdoor that they currently approved of his leadership.

How many startups in the region can confidently say their leaders are this well-received?

Probably one of the biggest indicators of his maturity and most importantly, humility, is witnessed from the memo he wrote to Expedia staff regarding his departure obtained by Recode.

“This has been one of the toughest decisions of my life. I’ve had the privilege to run Expedia for 12+ years now, and most of you who have been on this journey with me know it has not been easy going.”

“I have to tell you I am scared. I’ve been here at Expedia for so long that I’ve forgotten what life is like outside this place,” he added.

Best of luck Dara.

“Sustainability is not a tech problem, it is a human weakness.”

A fireside chat about Thailand’s competitive advantage at Echelon Thailand 2017 revealed a few more interesting tidbits regarding startup up growth, government involvement, and investment best practices shared by industry expert Dr. Alex Lin, Head of Ecosystem Development at SGInnovate, an establishment that connects over 7,000 regional and global corporates.

Let’s dive in.

The government, the corporation & the startup

“Governments love corporations because they bring jobs and money. Startups hate corporations because they are so rigid. It’s all love and hate,” says Alex.

“The moment you build a lot of startups, corporations will move in because very simply, they cannot innovate. Innovation threatens the CEO, he doesn’t want anything to come in and ‘kill’ his job.”

So how should businesses go about innovation?

“What’s the definition of innovation? It’s looking at the status quo and changing it.”

“What is the job of the government? It is to uphold the law – follow the rules that they created. They aren’t able to change the law, only the top dogs, so are they innovative?” explains Alex.

Governments need startups to innovate, they need the corporates to provide the customer base, domain knowledge and infrastructure and they themselves need to push initiatives – all three units need to work together to create a healthy ecosystem for growth. But unfortunately, this doesn’t always end up being the case – why?

“A strong opportunity for Thailand is fintech because there is a large chunk of the population not being served, they are the unbanked,” says Alex. “If they don’t have a lot access to finances, per unit cost is higher and they can’t buy in bulk.”

So why are there still so many unbanked (approximately 72% of Southeast Asia to be precise)? Banks simply aren’t interested in them.

And if fintech startups are being mentored by a bank, they end up becoming products of the bank to serve their agendas.

“Over 600 startups that were mentored by a bank and none of them ended up serving the unbanked.”

What other business opportunities exist in Thailand?

“Digital healthcare is a good market for Thailand because the country is a very homogenous market, i.e. everyone wants to be whiter, while in Singapore you have a mix of tan is good, white is good,” says Alex. “Thais are also willing to experiment with treatments.”

“What about not-for-profits startups?” asks an audience member.

Dr. Alex Lin here pulled a Donald Trump (in his own words).

“Global warming is a great cause and I would gladly donate or attend fundraisers for these charities but I would never invest in them because there is no ROI.”

“If you are a startup, you need to think about who is going to pay you and if you can’t survive, you have to figure that part out first.”

‘Solve people’s problems first. Don’t build technology and try to fit it in somewhere.’

 

#EchelonTH2017

The success of on-demand ride hailing app Uber in the recent years has facilitated the birth of the gig economy, where temporary, flexible jobs are common and businesses hire contractors to perform ad hoc tasks.

While companies used to hire more workers to get through peak periods, the gig economy model allows them to bring in additional temps when there is demand and cut costs.

That is what Helpster, a Thailand-based on-demand staffing platform, is doing – connecting companies with blue collar workers when they need extra hands. ecommerceIQ sat down with the startup’s CEO and co-founder Mathew Ward to talk about the ins and outs of his business.

Building a LinkedIn for blue collar workers

“There are still plenty of people looking for jobs and businesses who always need employees, but connectivity is the problem. If we talk with small business owners, finding and keeping staff is what keeps them up at night. People are always willing to pay for solutions to their pain points,” Mathew explains the business rationale behind Helpster.

Helpster was founded in October 2015 by Mathew and John Srivorakul, the CTO of the startup, as a platform that would connect customers with repair and cleaning service providers through its app.

It has now turned into a curated marketplace that matches blue collar workers seeking a job with businesses in industries with high demand for temporary staff such as restaurants, retail, and event management.

Helpster founders

Helpster started as a B2C platform for hiring handymen services, but soon realized this business model had low frequency. The company shifted focus to B2B market three months into operations.

“The problem we found with the on-demand home services market is that there is limited frequency. When was the last time you called a plumber? The acquisition costs for consumers are high, and it takes too long to get that investment back,” says Mathew.

Realizing this, Helpster started pitching their platform to businesses instead. In the new business-to-business (B2B) model the team saw that companies needed not just handymen, but also waiters and warehouse workers. The real challenge was access to labor – how could they quickly hire blue collar workers?

Filling in temp jobs typically have two options – job boards or agencies. Job boards comprise of applicants of which 95% are not relevant for the business and majority of blue collar workers don’t have a resume or an email. “They don’t use traditional job boards – they generally find jobs through word-of-mouth, making it difficult for businesses to find them quickly,” explains Mathew.

Agencies are good at providing quality staff, but at a high cost, slow pace and workers usually come with constrictive contracts. If a business wanted to hire the worker after his/her temporary stint, the company would be subject to an agency fee.

So where does Helpster fit? The platform enables workers to create a simple profile listing their skills and previous experience, what they would like to do and how much they would like to earn. In a way, blue collar workers create their resume on the Helpster platform.

In the meantime, companies looking for hires send Helpster jobs requests and a description of their needs. The platform then matches job opportunities to available workers with the right skill set, and assigns them to the job in minutes.

Same, same, but different

At first, Helpster’s business seems similar to startups such as ServisHero or Kaodim that connect consumers with different home service providers – electricians, plumbers, movers and others – but how often are their services really needed in a year?

Helpster differentiates itself by focusing on businesses that frequently need temp staff, for example, the food and hospitality industry. Caterers, waiters and kitchen staff are always in demand for year-round engagements such as weddings, birthday parties, pop-up markets, etc.

Besides job requests from food & beverage and hospitality companies, promotional consultants who help staff pop-up booths in shopping malls or hand out flyers are another popular category of vacancies. Helpster also staffs telephone sales and warehouse operations.

“When we need extra waiters for catering events, I use Helpster to find them. It’s the only company I know that offers such a service and we use them quite regularly,” says Una Plaude, partner at Luka café in Bangkok.

Helpster started its operations in Thailand where the unemployment rate in 2016 was around 1%, making it no surprise that hiring and retaining staff were impacting business growth. The company also recently expanded into Jakarta, Indonesia because both countries contained businesses with 20-30% staff turnover.

Blue collar workers, on the other hand, usually earn around $10 a day and live hand to mouth. This makes having quick access to suitable jobs important because majority of them don’t have savings. Helpster works to turn their problems into one another’s solution.

But the company won’t be alone in its quest for long. Rocket Internet’s Ushift, recently launched a similar service in the on-demand staffing market in Singapore with ambitions to expand to other countries.

“If you have a good idea, there will always be competitors. I actually would be worried if there were none because that would mean nobody else thinks it’s a decent business. It shows opportunity if a company like Rocket is willing to enter this space,” says Mathew.

The company at present is offering its service for free, but will soon be introducing a subscription model by charging a flat monthly fee for businesses to access its worker network. While the fee has not yet been set, Mathew said it will be below other traditional recruitment channels such as job boards to remain competitive.

Dealing with uncontrollable factors

A good business idea doesn’t mean challenges aren’t involved.

The company is not simply selling apples and oranges, they are selling a service – the promise that an employee will show up and do their job diligently.

And this reveals a cold, hard reality.

“Businesses can do all the screening possible but if a worker can’t be bothered to get out of the bed because of the rain or traffic, there’s nothing they can do,” says Mathew.

Helpster tries to solve this by giving temporary workers a rating that increases with the number of jobs they take and complete satisfactorily through the app.

To ensure that businesses are sent qualified staff, Helpster curates the workers by doing background checks on those who register on the platform. “When we first started, we made everyone come in for face-to-face interviews and criminal background checks. But that doesn’t always give insights into someone’s reliability. Performance ratings and engagement data is a much better indicator,” explains Mathew.

Helpster also learned that the location of the job is very important for blue collar workers. They’ll be happy to work down the street if they can earn 350 – 400 baht ($10 – $11) a day but less likely to travel, buy lunch to work a job across the city for the same amount.

So, how does Helpster acquire its network of workers?

“We try everything. We obviously have a digital strategy, but it’s critical for us to have a good ground game. Get out to the market and meet the people. A lot of our acquisition strategy revolves actively targeting workers around their places of work,” Mathew reveals.

Helpster recruits workers

Helpster goes on roadshows to universities, schools to attract young, tech savvy job seekers to their platform.

This strategy seems to be working. Over 80,000 workers and more than 3,000 companies have registered on the app so far and the company expects that number to grow considerably now they have launched in Jakarta.

Using data to make small changes for big impact

Helpster believes in using data to understand “what tweaks move the needle”. The company tracks which worker acquisition channels drive registration on the platform and if they lead to successful job applicants.

It was data that revealed that there can be such a thing as too many jobs on the platform.

Early on, Helpster was actively onboarding businesses to post their jobs on the platform, yet they noticed that a blue collar worker might take only 10 jobs a month even if he sees 100 job applications. They realized they needed to balance the supply of jobs with the actual demand from the workers to ensure a positive experience for businesses who needed temp staff quickly.

“Like any marketplace, balancing the levels of supply and demand are critical. Too much of one, and you will see high rates of churn. It can be a fine balance,” says Mathew.

Helpster can also forecast what parts of Bangkok on certain days will have high demand for a particular type of workers. For example, restaurants and bars in Sukhumvit road area look for extra hands during busy weekends.

Mathew says that 85% of the jobs are filled within 4 hours.

What’s next?

In November 2016, Helpster raised $2.1 million in Series A funding to expand across Southeast Asia. Now for three months, the startup has been present in Jakarta where 15,000 workers have signed up the platform. But the company is not planning to expand any more at the moment.

“Too many companies make the mistake of expanding too quickly. Blue collar worker wages in Southeast Asia make up around $200 billion per year, half of that is in sectors we’re focused on and 40% of workers are on informal employment contracts. Thailand and Indonesia are 60% of Southeast Asia so if we nail these two markets, we’re in a good position,” says Mathew.

Helpster team

He is not worried about the current downfall of certain on-demand startups seen globally since last year.

“I don’t think there is anything wrong with the idea to access things on demand. We’re focused on solving problems for businesses and for which they are willing to pay a premium,” says Mathew.

 

By Aija Krutaine

Events

Ecommerce Indonesia 2017 will be the first event in the region to bring together policy makers, BFSI experts, startup community, ICT technologists together to present you with the latest in:

 

Key Topics & Case Studies:

  • Upcoming ICT Projects and Policies
  • Startups : Driving the  digitization of Indonesia
  • Data Analytics To Cement Customer Loyalty
  • Building Trust in Online Payments
  • Personalizing IOT for mcommerce
  • Beefing Cyber-Security to increase confidence in online payments