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One hundred two billion dollars. That’s how much the value of ecommerce in Southeast Asia is estimated to exceed by 2025.

The latest e-Conomy of Southeast Asia report by Google and Singapore-based Temasek confirmed the growing confidence among investors in the region. Startups raised $9.1 billion in the first half of last year, almost as much as throughout the whole of 2017.

2018 was dubbed as the year of ecommerce for the region, so what can we expect in 2019? We speak to industry leaders to discover the anticipated trends for online retailers and brands in Southeast Asia.

1. Brands Shift Their Focus from Data Gathering to Data Utilization

The biggest differentiator between online and offline retail is the ability to track, collect, monitor, and manage information, all in real time.

Through online channels, brands are able to access customer data through chats, social media, and their own websites. This information can be used to devise online strategies. Globally, 73% of brands plan to allocate their ecommerce budget on data & analytics services in 2019.

However, despite the general agreement of its importance, many brands still have no concept of how to utilize data to their advantage.

“Even today, not all retailers have embraced data fully to the point where they think of themselves as data companies, and this might be why many companies are suffering.” Harvard Business School Professor Srikant M. Datar.

Data collection is easy but having and optimizing the analytics capability to use it is a completely different ball game.

A survey by ecommerceIQ identified data analysis as one of the most difficult skills to find among the digital talents in Southeast Asia. Brands are constantly searching for data aggregators to consolidate information into one place for convenient retrieval and use to target, retarget, and personalize products and services.

Reagan Chai, Head of Regional Business Intelligence and Business Development at Shopee told ecommerceIQ that data acquisition enables the company to map out and optimize buyer and seller user experience while pre-empting customer demand and anticipating future potential. The company has seen an increase in website traffic in the past year that even surpasses the other regional players.

In China, Alibaba and JD.com have taken this a step further by utilizes the data gathered online to improve inventories and experiences at their physical stores. Alibaba Chief Marketing Officer, Chris Tung said the company wants to help brands find the right consumers by tracking them throughout Alibaba’s system.

“We’re finding all data that has to do with people, their behavior, what they like, what they buy and binding this online data to real people,” concluded Chris.

Seeing the need, regional brand ecommerce enabler aCommerce launched a data analytics platform BrandIQ last year to enhance their capabilities as a data partner to help brands centralize their customer data and offer customized products or services to each target group.

The capabilities of BrandIQ that aim to enhance brands’ performance on online marketplace; BrandIQ

This leaves brands with two options: find an economical way to utilize the data or continue looking for a needle in a haystack.

2. Social Commerce Channels are Brands’ New Sales Outlets

Social commerce in this region boomed before the rise of ecommerce as we know now.

Facebook groups have long established as an online space where people connect to buy and sell goods, even before the launched of Marketplace feature. The social media’s rapid growth in Southeast Asia is propelled by mobile adoption and smartphone, where 90% of the online population access the internet via smartphones. For some, Facebook even defines the internet itself.

With multitudes of potential customers gathered in social media platforms, brands naturally espied alternative sales channels. Following Facebook’s footsteps, social platforms like Instagram and Pinterest have also developed their own shoppable features.

“Brands will miss out if they don’t have a social media presence. The best way to get feedback from consumers is by having a direct conversation,” Deb Liu, Vice President, Facebook Marketplace told Forbes.

LINE recently acquired a social commerce management startup Sellsuki in Thailand, where it has the second biggest user base, to build a strong foundation for its ecommerce business. The company has also formed a joint venture with three local banks to offer personalized loans to SMEs.

A few big brands like L’Oreal have already equipped their social media page with ‘Shop’ feature that allows consumers to purchase the order directly on the page and it’s only a matter of time before more brands activate the platforms as one their sales channels and remove another layer between them and the consumers.

Consumers can purchase L’Oreal products on their Facebook page assisted through the Messenger app until the checking out process; L’Oreal Thailand.

3. E-Marketplaces Launch New Services to Differentiate

Looking at the successful existing ecommerce players in more developed markets, one key success factor they share is the various services rolled out on their fully-controlled supply chain.

JD.com’s investment to the development of their own supply chain allows them to scale their technology and offer Retail-as-a-Service proposition to help other retailers or brands sell online. Alibaba is unrivaled on its extensive ecosystem beyond commerce, including a logistics network Cainiao, a payment firm Ant Financial, not to mention its recent foray into the entertainment industry.

The same practice has infiltrated down to Southeast Asia. Lazada has strengthened its logistics arm FBL (Fulfilled by Lazada) post the acquisition, and although no concrete plans have been disclosed, Shopee has expressed the intention to build its own logistics network.

Singapore’s Qoo10 is set to launch its blockchain-based ecommerce site QuuBee this year, leveraging the blockchain technology to eliminate the transaction and listing fee which in turn increase the retailers’ profit margin and make a more sustainable commerce approach.

In Indonesia, Tokopedia is set to offer “Infrastructure-As-a-Service” with the fresh $1.1 billion funding. They also plan to use AI for customer care services and to run credit checks on merchants seeking loans to expand their businesses.

The practice is not exclusively done by the general e-marketplaces. Fashion e-marketplace Zilingo scored $226 million in funding due to their new focus to build a network of fashion supply chain that anyone, small merchants or big retailers, can tap into.

“It’s imperative for us to build products that introduce machine learning and data science effectively to SMEs while also being easy to use, get adopted and scale quickly. We’re re-wiring the entire supply chain with that lens so that we can add the most value,” revealed Zilingo CTO Dhruv Kapoor to TechCrunch.

Facebook is also showing more intention to jump into the bandwagon that is the region’s ecommerce. The social network has launched Marketplace feature in Thailand and Singapore without much fanfare, but the recent partnership with Kasikorn Bank in Thailand to allow in-app payment feature might be the start of the company’s effort to bulk up its commerce capabilities and cater to those that utilized the platform for their business.

Facebook partners with Thailand’s Kasikorn Bank to enable transfers and card payments on chats from Facebook Messenger; Facebook

 

In a bid to recruit more brands to sell on their platforms, we anticipate that e-marketplaces will continue to go head-to-head with each other through new services, acquisitions, and partnerships. Ready to burn more cash to win in this battle, e-marketplaces?

4. Brands to Reinforce Reviews and Fund User-Generated Content to Win Ecommerce Consumers

E-marketplaces in Southeast Asia has been upscaling and building add-ons which provide consumers with the utmost convenience. The search for better technology and assistance for the consumers is constant and never-ending.

Lazada introduces AI-powered image search feature onto its platform which allows shoppers to take a picture of an item and the platform will suggest similar items available; LiveatPC

Online consumers begin their online purchasing journeys by searching for product information or reading reviews, usually on the e-marketplace platforms, before making their purchase decision. They are looking for real opinions and user-generated reviews to validate the products.

The habit of leaving product reviews on ecommerce platform is not as common in Southeast Asia as it is in the US — Amazon even have dedicated page for top reviewers — and when they do, the reviews usually left little information about the product and more about the other aspect of the purchase (i.e. delivery time, packaging, etc).

Platforms like ReviewIQ are used by brands to increase their ratings and reviews engagement on their e-marketplace listings to help boost consumers make their decision. While the use of chatbots is an increasingly popular solution to help smooth the online customer experience, it’s more suitable for generic questions such as “where is my order?” or “is this product available?” instead of personalised questions such as “will this lipstick look good on a yellow-undertone skin?”.

Community-crowd model like one that’s popular with travel platforms such as Airbnb might also be suitable for ecommerce in the region to help consumers get passed their apprehension with online shopping — something that Edouard Steinert, aCommerce Thailand’s Director of Channel Management, is investigating to help the company’s clients as this model has shown to save time, increase results, and keep costs low.

“Consumers today want to hear genuine feedback and reviews about a product and become more averse to hard-sell methods. [User-generated] Reviews, especially from people who share the same passion with them, proved to drive better conversion for the brand,” added Edouard Steinert.

5. Brands Employ Direct-to-Consumer strategies to Acquire Direct Consumer Data

89% of companies are now competing mostly on a customer experience playing field and the Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) approach is becoming more important for brands as it allows them to gain insights into their end users and anticipate their needs.

One trend observed among brands to promote DTC is ecommerce subscription. From a consumer perspective, subscription offers a convenient, personalized, and often cheaper way to buy what they need. For brands, it’s a subtle method to create customer loyalty in the digital landscape.

One brand adopting subscription ecommerce in the region is Nescafe Dolce Gusto, offering free coffee machines in exchange for a minimum 12-month subscription. Besides witnessing sales growth, Nescafe Dolce Gusto also noticed that consumers continued to purchase goods from its brand despite dropping out of the subscription plan.

“They may have dropped out of the subscription but not the brand. They still buy capsules from different channels; ecommerce website, online marketplaces, and supermarkets. A subscription strategy is not just a long-term consumption enabler but also a consumer acquisition channel for the whole brand,” Bhuree Ackarapolpanich, Brand Director & Digital Expert at Nescafé Dolce Gusto.

aCommerce’s Regional Director of Project Management, Mandy Arbilo said that e-sampling is a popular strategy employed by brands to evaluate the demand, especially ecommerce.

While normal sampling techniques used by offline retailers are expensive, e-sampling saves brands up to 40% as well as providing essentials customer data.

Mars Petcare is one of the e-sampling pioneers for aCommerce. The campaign prompted up to 25% of pet owners to try Pedigree as the main meal; aCommerce

As DTC becomes widely adopted, consumers will see brands coming up with attractive gimmicks using digital tools to gain insights and entice consumers to spend more on their brands.

6. 2019 Will Finally see Regulation of Ecommerce across the Region

Ecommerce practice in the region has remained largely unregulated as a nascent occurrence. As the industry grows, it is only a matter of time until governments step in to tax this fast-growing segment and level the playing field for foreign companies to offer digital services and goods locally.

News of the implementation of ecommerce tax regulations in Southeast Asian countries has been floating around since the beginning of last year but nothing concrete has as yet materialized.

A couple of months ago, Economic Ministers from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) signed an agreement to facilitate cross-border ecommerce transactions within the region.

However, while nothing has written in stone, predictions abound concerning the impacts of ecommerce tax on imported goods into the region. In Indonesia and Thailand, ecommerce tax is predicted to bolster the growth of social commerce because, unlike marketplaces, they are uncontrolled.

“If tax regulations restrict ecommerce platforms, making selling in Bukalapak complicated, there will be an exodus of people who prefer selling on Instagram and Facebook. These platforms are uncontrolled and not chased for tax because they sell through the back door,” Bukalapak co-founder and Chief Financial Officer Muhamad Fajrin Rasyid.

Singapore might also see a decrease in cross-border shopping as prices increase with the introduction of Goods and Service Tax (GST) on ecommerce goods and services from overseas. Currently, 89% of all cross-border transactions in the Asia Pacific region are conducted by Singaporeans.

A snapshot of the state of ecommerce tax regulations across six major Southeast Asian markets; ecommerceIQ

Looking at another high-potential ecommerce market, India introduces the new e-marketplace laws that indicate the prohibition of marketplace “owners” to sell products on their own marketplace through vendor entities in which they have an equity interest. It also prevents marketplaces to make deals with sellers that grants the marketplace exclusivity rights on the product. Could we see such laws be applied in Southeast Asia?

Regardless, brands will have very little influence on how the new tax policies take root but they will be behooved to anticipate the ruling and adjust online strategy accordingly to mitigate the impact of a shift in customer behavior. This ASEAN agreement will encourage more local entrepreneurs to create new products and venture online to access a larger and more diverse market. Brands will now need to be nimble and innovative to adapt to local nuances and preferences.

7. Grab and Go-Jek Challenge Logistics Providers to Capture Ecommerce and Online Food Delivery

Since Uber’s exit last March, Grab monopoly in countries like Thailand, the Philippines, and Malaysia has led to complaints about services and prices increased which resulted in protests from consumers and fines from governments which hit the headlines of the Filipino newspapers and Singaporean watchdogs.

But with the recent regional expansion from Indonesia’s Go-Jek, the competition between the two will only get fiercer. Go-Jek has successfully carved its existence in Vietnam, Singapore, and Thailand last year alone. In addition, Grab’s competitor in Malaysia, Dacsee, has also expressed the plan of expanding to Thailand.

Both companies are not racing to be the best ride-hailing providers, they’re aiming for something much bigger; super apps. Go-Jek has secured $1 billion funds from Google, Tencent, and JD.com in part of their plan to raise $2 billion for this venture. Meanwhile, Grab recently nabbed $200 million investment from Thailand’s Central Group, boosting their valuation to 11 billion to date.

2019 will see these two competitors steer toward the same goal of food and ecommerce delivery. Google and Temasek reported that the online food delivery business grew 73% CAGR in 2019. By 2025, they predict online food delivery growth at 36% CAGR with online transport only 23%.

Market size of the ride-hailing industry in Southeast Asia; e-Conomy SEA 2018 Report by Google and Temasek

“We will be expanding our GrabFood and delivery business and deepening our relationships with restaurant merchants and key partners in some markets,” said Grab’s head of regional operations Russell Cohen.

Same-day delivery providers are going to feel more competition next year. The impact of Grab and Go-Jek on market vibes will definitely raise the bar for the logistics and delivery sector.

8. Brands and Retailers will Double Down on Omnichannel is Southeast Asia’s Preference over Pure-Play Ecommerce

The omnichannel shopping experience is not a new concept, but companies do have diverse interpretations of the concept. Headlines revealed that online retail behemoths, such as Amazon and Alibaba, are moving into physical retail.

The main reason why Alibaba ventured out of online space reflects its determination to solve core problems of the shopping experience, such as scattered operations and lack of payment transparency.

JD.com pipped Alibaba for once by opening the first unmanned convenience store in the region in Jakarta to leverage the enormous database by offering beneficial insights to brands such as the best products to stock and advertise. Through their JV with Central Group in Thailand, JD Central also planning a similar launch in the country by 2020.

Inside JD.ID X Mart in Indonesia. It is JD.com’s first unmanned store outside of China and it is a demonstration of JD.com’s mission to implement RaaS; Food Navigator Asia

Pure-play ecommerce retailers and brands recognized drawbacks in online marketing channels with fragmented infrastructure and a limited pool of shoppers. They promoted offline as an attractive option to push sales growth.

Elsewhere in Southeast Asia, companies are slowly but surely adopting this strategy across all categories. Ecommerce fashion players like Thailand’s Pomelo and Singapore’s Love, Bonito have opened physical stores in their respective countries.

In 2018, Pomelo opened 5 new outlets, embarking away from Bangkok’s prime shopping areas to central business districts (CBDs) like Asoke and residential areas of Bangna. Meanwhile, Love, Bonito has 17 retail outlets spread across Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Cambodia.

Rachel Lim, Co-Founder of Love, Bonito told Peak Magazine, “Data can tell you what’s selling but being on the ground tells you why something is not selling and what the customer is looking for.”

Visiting shopping malls is a popular social activity in Southeast Asia and this trend is not set to disappear anytime soon. Brands should take advantage of dual physical and online presence.

Updated (28 Feb 2019): Shopee Thailand does not have a solid plan to build its own logistics network yet. The comment was mentioned briefly in the interview with Bangkok Post which was made a focal point by the media.

Ecommerce has been snowballing for more than six years in Southeast Asia but yet only recently, was there any progressive movement in taxing digital transactions.

Government bodies in Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia understand the importance of taxes on ecommerce sales (products and services) in order to capture a piece of the fast growing segment and more importantly, level the playing field between its brick-and-mortar peers.

But implementing new tax regimes proves difficult given Southeast Asia’s “diverse and uncertain legal environment” explains Steven Sieker, head of Asia Pacific tax practice group.

Under existing taxation laws, only local players and not foreign companies across markets fall within local tax regimes.

“The main point is to try to tax multinational companies that are not registered in Thailand for their online business,” said Kanchirat Thaidamri, tax partner for Deloitte Thailand.

“Online is simply a reflection of what exists in the offline world: small stores don’t report all their taxes in the outside world” – Jason Ding, partner at Bain & Co, China

Below is a snapshot of the state of ecommerce tax regulations across six major APAC markets:

Ecommerce Tax in Indonesia

ecommerceIQ

In 2017, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani stated the government wanted to “level the playing field between businesses that operate online and those offline, which must add 10% Value Added Tax (VAT) to the price of goods purchased”. While the tax rate is still unknown, it is expected to be lower than 10%.

The ecommerce tax, when implemented, will cover four types of platforms: online marketplaces, classified ads, daily deals and online retail that operate in the local markets but will not be levied on sales through social networks (mainly Instagram and Facebook).

Impact? Bolster the growth of social commerce in Indonesia, a country where social media platform usage is one of the highest in the world and weaken incentive to sell on e-marketplaces like Tokopedia and Lazada. Applying a 10% VAT rate to the online sector would bring in approximately USD$1.34 billion in additional tax revenues.

The Indonesia Ecommerce Association (idEA) was discussing a 0.5% VAT from each marketplace seller at the beginning of the year with the Finance Ministry – nothing has been implemented.

“If the tax regulation restricts ecommerce platforms – making selling in Bukalapak complicated because of the tax – there will be an exodus of people who would prefer selling on Instagram and Facebook, which is uncontrolled and not chased for tax because they sell through the back door,” – Bukalapak co-founder and chief financial officer Muhamad Fajrin Rasyid.

Timeline for implementation? Public trial in 2019.

Ecommerce Tax in Thailand

ecommerceIQ
In July earlier this year, the Cabinet approved a proposal to collect 7% VAT from foreign ecommerce platforms deriving annual service income exceeding THB1.8 million (US$56,000). These businesses must sign up as operators under the VAT system to report to the Revenue Department.

The Nation reports the taxes apply to those selling goods and services on Internet platforms as well as the operators of Internet platforms such as Google, Amazon and Alibaba. Companies with an overseas presence and earning income from advertising/website space rental from Thailand are also subject to a 15% withholding tax.

Impact? Operators such as Facebook and Google could pass on the additional costs to its sellers and ad buyers, likewise with  JD Central, Lazada and Shopee customers. Smaller players could be deterred from doing ecommerce if the business cannot sustain these taxes. Currently, vendors outside of Thailand are liable for 7% VAT only if value exceeds THB 1,500 (USD$45.76).

Timeline for implementation? Government needs to forward the draft VAT bill to the Council of State (the government’s legal advisory body) before submitting to the National Legislative Assembly for a debate. Early 2019.

Ecommerce Tax in Philippines

ecommerceIQThe country is the only market out of the region with an ecommerce taxation. The 12% VAT on total value of online transactions of more than USD$37,310 came into effect in 2016 and is applicable to store owners as well. For transactions lower than the threshold, a 3% VAT is levied instead on online transactions.

Impact? Any person or entity who, in the course of trade or business, sells, exchanges, or leases goods or properties, or renders services, and any person who imports goods, is liable to VAT. The government has its own challenges enforcing these taxes on different online business models as shutting down websites only leads to another one being created under a different IP address.

Ecommerce Tax in Malaysia

ecommerceIQAs of late 2017, there is a mechanism under Malaysia’s current GST model that taxes online services provided by local companies to Malaysian consumers, but currently is not applicable to foreign service providers.

Impact? The implementation of the digital tax may mean that foreign service providers serving Malaysian consumers will be charged with tax. The service provider can pass on the tax to customers by adding it to existing prices.

Timeline for implementation? The country is likely to follow the steps of its close neighbour Singapore.

Ecommerce Tax in Singapore

ecommerceIQCurrently, any online purchase in Singapore under SGD$400 (USD$290.17) is exempt from GST. The government did not include ecommerce tax in the budget released in February 2018 but the Ministry of Finance (MOF) said “B2B imported services will be taxed via a reverse charge mechanism, while B2C imported services will be taxed through an overseas vendor registration model” according to the Strait Times.

Impact? Decrease in shopping overseas as prices could increase with the introduction of GST on ecommerce goods and services from overseas.

Timeline for implementation? While many thought the new GST would be implemented in the 2018 budget released February this year, the government has tabled a concrete tax for ecommerce until 2020. Starting January 1, 2020, consumers will pay GST when buying online services from overseas, which includes music, video streaming, apps, online subscriptions, and digital B2B services such as marketing/accounting).

Ecommerce Tax in Vietnam

ecommerceIQ

Vietnam is one of Southeast Asia’s most attractive and also nascent markets. Foreign ecommerce firms must have local representative office registered in Vietnam and pay VAT of 10%. Individual residents without an established ecommerce company in Vietnam will be subject to tax if they have annual sales revenue over USD$4,300. As of now, there isn’t heavy enforcement in place but there are plans for higher scrutiny by the National Assembly next year.

In November 2017, Vietnam’s government also released a proposal for all cross-border payments to be made through domestic gateways via the National Payment Corporation of Vietnam.

Impact? Not much concern in regards to Vietnam’s attractiveness as few companies have managed to ‘crack the local market’ and ecommerce contribution to total retail is still relatively small compared to other markets. The cross-border payments funnel will increase the tracking of tax liabilities by the National Payment Corporation of Vietnam.

Timeline for implementation? Late 2019.

Difficulties implementing an ecommerce tax in Southeast Asia

Apart from climbing over the layers of government and overcoming pressure from big corporates, and complaints from SMEs calling foul play, regulators also face the large task of enforcing such new reforms, especially concerning tax on digital services.

Products are easily tracked through physical movement in the country but services are intangible.

Axcelasia Inc Executive Chairman Dr. Veerinderjeet Singh shares: “The problem with foreign online companies is they will charge 6% GST on customers for the purchase and delivery [in Malaysia], but how will the Customs collect that amount when they don’t have offices in the country? How do you regulate that? And if they miss a few payments, how will you impose a penalty on them?”

Between now and 2020, when most implementations across Southeast Asia are expected to take root, Internet platforms and operators have little influence on the new tax policies but it’s the customers and the shift in their behaviour that will be largely impacted.

In the words of Senior Minister of State for Law and Finance Indranee Rajah, “keep shopping while you can”.

The fourth quarter is always the busiest season for retailers and brands across the world, Southeast Asia is no exception. The wave of mega sales typically observed offline during Black Friday in December have moved online thanks to prolific marketplaces like Amazon, Alibaba and Lazada. These campaigns now occur consecutively on 9.9, 11.11, and 12.12 (September 9th, November 11th, and December 12th) and cause headaches for brands new to ecommerce.

Businesses must plan ahead well in advance with multiple partners to hit their annual online revenue targets as up to 40% of GMV can be generated in the last three months of the year.

To help brands make the best of the shopping season, these are 10 strategies based on experience working with e-marketplaces, talking to ecommerce enablers, and data from some of the biggest brands across Southeast Asia.

While this guide is most applicable to enhancing performance during the upcoming “mega online sales campaigns” held by players like Lazada and Shopee in Southeast Asia, brands can increase chances to maximize sales and minimize costly mistakes with the findings.

Let’s dive right in.

1. Promotions & Merchandising

Getting this part right may sound trivial but it’s the main ingredient for a successful sales campaign. If the product offering clashes with offline deals and/or pricing is weak, no matter how much is spent on marketing, there will unlikely be high sales volumes

This is akin to achieving product-market fit prior to scaling your business.

So how should brands approach this? Well, what are brands trying to get out of these mega sales – revenues or general visibility/awareness?

In the case of the former, brands need to secure prime real estate on a marketplace such as the homepage or category page, which are typically allocated based on attractive discounts, online traffic and cash vouchers.

In order to drive revenue, exclusive “doorbuster” deals are especially important when top competitors – official and grey market sellers alike – selling similar or identical items are dropping prices.

Mass market brands are free to offer discounts, whereas premium market brands cannot use discounting as a viable strategy (channel conflict) and should look at adding value via bundling and exclusive GWP (Gift With Purchase). These tactics work well without having to tarnish the brand in the long-term.

In the case of visibility/awareness, more budget should be allocated to advertising and promotions to drive traffic to an upgraded shop-in-shop design to make a good first impression on new shoppers.

Brands can also utilize data tools to evaluate their positive in a competitive landscape (examples include BrandIQ) and benchmark competitor SKUs, promos and pricing ahead of the online sales festival.

ecommerce holiday strategies

BrandIQ Marketplace Analytics & Digital Shelf Monitoring

Planning and approval of the pricing strategy for end year – final list of SKUs, pricing, bundles and GWPs – will take the longest time. The brand then needs to share this plan ahead of a ‘freezing period’ to let marketplaces like Lazada and Shopee evaluate and approve the campaigns. And relative to the e-marketplaces other seller applications, it will allocate site visibility.

2. Inventory & Stock

Once SKUs and pricing is set, brands need to ensure there is enough physical stock to meet the forecasted demand.

This requires scrubbing historical data, if available, and use proxy data points like offline channel sales if not.

With a forecast in place, products are ordered and inbounding slots at partner or brand fulfillment centers are reserved and dedicated to online sales. This should all be completed at minimum two weeks in advance.

Lastly, brands should set up automatic ‘out of stock’ triggers to receive emails and SMS whenever a product sells out. This can also be applied strategically to competitor SKUs too through tools like BrandIQ – this allows ecommerce store managers to respond with targeted pricing promotions whenever a key competitor SKU runs out.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Price change triggers in BrandIQ

3. Traffic Acquisition

A common dilemma faced by brands during sales season is whether or not to double down on marketing spend.

CPCs (cost-per-clicks) are typically higher during a period when other brands are prioritizing and spending aggressively on marketing. The idea behind this is returns tend to be higher too because of higher conversion rates resulting from more competitive SKUs, pricing and bundles.

If a brand can afford it, it’s recommended to increase spending during the sales season. In addition, a “warm-up” or teaser campaign prior to the big launch is also recommended and actually required by marketplaces like Lazada.

Brands also perform better when leveraging an existing customer email database or mobile phone list or building them using formats like Facebook Lead Ads well before the shopping season, when CPCs are still relatively low.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Facebook Lead Ads to build up email database ahead of the sales season

With this targeted database, brands can drive traffic during the sales campaign by sending emails or SMS to the list with promo codes to be used online during targeted dates.

While barter deals are more effective for brands to gain better on-site visibility, it’s also recommended to allocate budget to marketplace paid ads such as Lazada Sponsored Products and Shopee My Ads. These ad formats are still affordable compared to Facebook and Google ads and help acquire users when they’re already in a shopping mindset. They also help brands stand out on category pages as well as competitor product detail pages.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee My Ads

But when multiple brands are fighting for the same site banner placements, exclusivity and doorbuster deals are prioritized by marketplaces over sponsored ads.

Beyond the typical Facebook and Google paid ads to drive traffic, brands can also look into non-conventional channels such as Quora Ads and Shopback. CPCs and CPAs (cost-per-acquisition) are often lower due to less competition.

4. Traffic Activation & Conversion

Driving traffic is not enough; they need to convert into sales. To do this, brands have several levers to pull.

First, upgrade to an official shop-in-shop format if not yet done already. Commission fees will increase but this format goes beyond just a badge as it improves product search ranks and peace of mind for shoppers worried about authentic goods.

Maybelline Official LazMall Shop-in-Shop on Lazada Thailand

High-conversion shop-in-shop layouts. Source: aCommerce Shop-in-Shop Design Gallery.

The typical customer journey on marketplaces goes from the shop-in-shop homepage → category pages → product detail pages (PDPs).

The product detail pages is where customers need to be incentivized to “add to cart”. PDP optimization requires descriptive and rich product titles, images, body content, etc.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA product detail page optimization

One important element of PDPs are customer ratings and reviews. Unfortunately, most reviews on marketplaces in Southeast Asia tend to be few and often, not very helpful. To acquire more high quality reviews, either connect the brand.com product reviews/ratings to the Lazada product page or if no brand.com exists, leverage tools such as ReviewIQ to generate more reviews for certain SKUs on Lazada and Shopee.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA customer reviews generated via ReviewIQ

Another driver for conversions is live chat offered by both Lazada and Shopee. This is a great opportunity to increase conversions, especially for more expensive or complex products that require product detail exchange between the buyer and the merchant.

With an estimated one-third of ecommerce transactions in Thailand happening through Instagram, Facebook and LINE, users have come to expect live chat in other B2C channels as well.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada Thailand live chat

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee live chat

For brands selling directly to customers via their own brand.com sites, an abandoned cart email should be active to regain lost revenue as well as retargeting pixels to drop cookies for a retargeting campaign during and right after the mega sales period.

5. Customer Service

From a CS perspective, brands need to prepare their customer service team on best-selling product details, pricing and overall campaign. In addition, having a master FAQ document or wiki that’s circulated ahead of time will allow CS teams or a dedicated agent to operate more efficiently during the campaign period.

If allowed, brands may want to scale up CS staff with temporary labor accounting for the increase in demand during the sales period. This should be tied back to the demand forecast. Platforms like Helpster in Thailand and Indonesia offer brands an easy way to quickly ramp up temporary staff.

6. Monitoring

A large and often negative impact on a brand’s performance online is the abundance of grey market sellers that undercut product prices.

As marketplaces aren’t incentivized to remove grey sellers selling authentic products and will only delist pirated goods, brands can only focus on improving their own product selection, search rank and educating its consumers on its official online channels.

In addition to raising concerns to the marketplace on removing counterfeit goods, brands can use BrandIQ to track grey market SKUs or other brands that impact its promotions, e.g. Mimi Poko vs. Mamy Poko:

ecommerce holiday strategies

Mimi Poko on Lazada Thailand

7. Packaging

Packaging seems mundane in comparison to the other sales levers but it’s a customer touch point to increase repurchase rates. In addition to an eye-pleasing design and quality of the packaging itself, promotions via flyers or vouchers to drive follow-up actions such as cross-sell and up-sell.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Pedigree box design

8. Fulfillment & Delivery

Customers value packages to be delivered in a quick and efficient manner.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada customer chat with merchant complaining about expected delivery times.

For brands to succeed here in the last mile, we recommend the following:

  • Organize the warehouse set up at least one week ahead of time – reserved inbound, outbound slots – to ensure delivery to customers within SLA
  • Give the warehouse the estimated order volume factoring in marketing, promotions, and competition well ahead of time
  • Prepare enough packaging material such as carton boxes, bubble wrap, packing foam, etc. to meet forecasted demand
  • Align with 3PLs to ensure its capabilities to pick up and deliver packages given the high volume
  • Prepare an on-demand delivery resource in case of over-capacity, e.g. LINEMAN, Grab Delivery

9. Business Operations

Ecommerce is a cross-functional, team-based effort, especially during the mega sales period where tight-knit coordination is the difference between hitting record highs or dropping the ball:

  • Set up war room dedicated to a cross-functional team that manages all operations during the campaign period. Prepare food because it’s going to be long stretches of day and night and weekends as 9.9 and 11.11 both happen on Sunday
  • The team needs to proactively monitor active campaigns during the day to ensure everything is synced properly, e.g. stock, price, etc. and may even needs to reply quickly to customer chats if CS is overwhelmed
  • Marketing and store managers to check all campaign landing pages after launch. Last thing needed is money spent on driving traffic to 404 pages
  • Debrief / post-mortem for the next big sale (right around the corner)

10. Website Stability

To avoid mishaps such as Amazon’s very own Prime Day meltdown, these tips apply only if a brand is running its own brand.com site, not marketplace shop-in-shop:

  • 2-3 weeks prior to peak period, perform a load test (also known as a stress test) to determine the traffic limits of your existing infrastructure setup. This will arm you with the knowledge of server limits and determine benchmark for an upgrade
  • Upgrade server processing power and network bandwidth 24-48 hours ahead of campaign day to be able to handle the spike in traffic
  • Test promotions, for sanity and determine if any loopholes
  • Enforce a code freeze period (no deployments) to reduce the risk of introducing bugs from new features during or prior to peak period
  • Prior to, communicate to web support teams to be readily available and on standby for peak trading. Hope for the best, prepare for the worse

But regardless of the above, performance will be determined by the right online channel for your brand or product category. Based on ecommerceIQ research, Shopee is a preferred platform by consumers for female-oriented categories like fashion and mom and baby items, whereas Lazada is preferred for categories such as electronics and home appliances.

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Brands without inhouse ecommerce capabilities tend to work with ecommerce enablers to optimize their online performance. Contact us for a free consulting session: hello@ecommerceIQ.asia

I put out a survey two weeks back about ecommerce enablers to find out the sentiment towards these companies in ASEAN, if brands actually use them (why or why not), and areas where they believed partners could improve.

The answers I received were not what I expected.

60 percent of respondents reported using an “ecommerce enabler”, but given their answers, most didn’t understand the difference between a marketplace and an enabler.

ecommerceIQ

Very simply put, ecommerce enablers are service providers that help a brand execute its digital strategy through a one-stop solution. This solution encompasses content production, web platform optimization, performance marketing, technology to integrate all digital channels, all the way to customer care, fulfillment and/or delivering it to the end customer’s doorstep.

Ecommerce enablers provide a client with whatever it takes to sell successfully online.

Popular examples in Southeast Asia include: aCommerce, iCommerce, etc.

Lazada, Shopee, 11street are not ecommerce enablers, they are the platforms for businesses to sell on. Sure, they might lend a brand an account manager who periodically checks in but their goal is to push for lower product prices and exclusive channel promotions.

The marketplace is neither charging the business for this service or providing special treatment – if a better performing merchant comes along, it catches you later.

This is why Alibaba’s Tmall has its own list of Tmall Partners – specialised agencies that build functional stores for businesses on the Tmall platform. Tmall itself is not the enabler.

The same goes for marketing platforms such as MailChimp, payment gateways like Paypal and delivery companies like Kerry Express or NinjaVan – they may not be ecommerce enablers but they are important pieces of the ecommerce supply chain.

This distinction is vital to the growth of ecommerce in Southeast Asia, especially as most global brands – Samsung, Unilever, L’Oreal, etc. – are choosing to outsource their ecommerce BUs to other experts.

Why? Because inhouse teams aren’t sure how to structure themselves. Over 65 percent of global marketers feel teams are “somewhat integrated” or “broken out by channel”. For ecommerce to work, Marketing needs to align with Sales, and Service.

 

ecommerceIQ

But ecommerce isn’t a magical band-aid capable of fixing all problems – especially not corporate silos.

Aื FMCG industry leader recently asked me, “what is something you would do to improve my brand’s digital strategy?”

My reply?

“Establish internally what the business wants from ecommerce, who’s in charge of this division and the resources the business is willing to dedicate before even bothering to bring on an enabler. Without internal alignment, it becomes one inefficient mess and everyone ends up pulling hair.”

After working with some of the world’s top brands – Unilever, Microsoft, Reckitt Benckiser, Payless, Samsung – I’ve been fortunate enough to see how these well-oiled machines function and why it doesn’t necessarily work for ecommerce.

The beauty of digital is that it’s instantaneous, which is the complete opposite of how decisions are made in these enormous corporations. It’s new, it’s disruptive.

Online moves quickly and requires constant care because a store that never sleeps means inventory, pricing, recommendations, customer support need to be up to date 24/7. It gets even more complicated when the ecommerce enabler needs to manage a brand.com and a marketplace shop-in-shop (SIS).

What often gets overlooked by brands is the shift in power.

Dangling more visibility over the thousands of grey market and official sellers on its site, a marketplace will push aggressively for more deals, more exclusivity, more vouchers, now, now, yesterday, while the brand pushes back with the same tenacity, touting “channel conflict”, and scrambling to squeeze funds from other departments.

The brand finally ends up throwing paperwork at the problem two weeks past the deadline.

Who wins?

No one.

Certainly not the enabler.

How is it in 2018, we still don’t know how to do ecommerce?

As a marketplace, its job is to offer the best deals and shopping experience to customers to grab market share. It does this by subsidizing prices, and by nudging its merchants to sell more and offer exclusives.

As a brand, its job is to sell to as many customers as possible, keep its distributors civil, maintain brand consistency across channels and mitigate the amount of friction between departments. It does this by offering the same promotions to each channel partner, allocating resources in a democratic fashion and following processes to a tee.

As an ecommerce enabler, its job is to work with its client and ecommerce partners (marketplace, 3PL, payment gateways, etc.) to increase GMV by optimizing digital channels. It does this by executing on behalf of the brand a strong digital strategy, which sometimes means bartering with the marketplace for more visibility for its clients.

Ecommerce enablers are by far nowhere near perfect. Imagine a marriage counsellor trying to find compromise between two hot-headed and egotistic partners refusing to budge but still looking to have a long term relationship.

Oh, and sessions aren’t once a week, it’s an uphill climb everyday. This respondent hit it on the head when describing what they did not like about its enabler.

“Not mature business yet.”

While the concept of ecommerce is not new in the world, the execution, talent and best practices are still nascent in Southeast Asia.

Customers in APAC need education on ecommerce, a company’s ecommerce team in APAC needs education on how to work with other departments, and marketplaces in APAC are still figuring out how to be more like Alibaba and Amazon, two companies with over 10 years operating experience.

An ecommerce enabler is supposed to have all the answers. While a challenge to take on, especially in Southeast Asia, it’s a hot business with a lot to gain, and probably why ecommerce enablers have popped up all over Southeast Asia and India.

And it’s been somewhat positive for respondents using an enabler as majority would recommend it to a friend or colleague.

“Getting an ecommerce enabler should definitely be considered, regardless of what stage a business who wants or is doing ecommerce is in.”

“Allows me to focus on my core business capability and rest assured online segment is still moving along.”

ecommerceIQ

Now what?

Now that the distinction has been made between a marketplace, a payment gateway, a marketing tool and an ecommerce enabler who ties them all together, a business needs to decide whether it needs marriage counselling.

Is it more cost effective to invest and build a team to manage digital channels inhouse or outsource it to a third-party partner? The survey respondents listed reasons why they work with an enabler:

“Aligned with brand principal interest and cost effective”
“Short time to market, revenue growth”
“Strong communications, effective operations”

Now you’ve identified you need one, how do you choose an ecommerce enabler?

  • Assess the experience of its leaders – do they have a strong track record in high-performing digital businesses?
  • Assess the existing clientele – are you in a similar tier/size/industry?
  • Assess the company’s own digital footprint – their performance marketing will be telling of the performance marketing they do for you
  • Assess the scope of work – is the enabler incentivized to sell more for your business?

And now take a look at your own business and decide whether it’s ready to commit to ecommerce. Is there an efficient approval process in place for resource allocation and commercial sign off for digital channels? Is there a C-level stakeholder responsible for P&L?

If not, time to move fast because in the digital world, it’s either give all or risk losing a lot.

 

Want to build an ecommerce strategy in Southeast Asia or speak to an enabler? Send an email to hello@ecommerceIQ.asia or fill out the contact form below





On June 28, 2018, Alibaba announced the launch of Taobao Xinxuan (淘宝心选), which translates to ‘Taobao Selected’. After a year in alpha testing, the company’s new concept is finally available to the wider public.

Through the website or one of two physical stores in Hangzhou and Shanghai, users can shop for affordable quality lifestyle and functional daily necessity goods including home fragrance, smart power sockets, underwear, and sonic-control toothbrushes.

ecommerceIQ

Rimowa?

According to TechNode, the recently opened store in Shanghai was raided and emptied by eager customers in a mere two hours.

What is Taobao Xinxuan?

Appearance wise, the Taobao Xinxuan concept will remind many of Japanese retailer Muji, whose clean and simplistic stores offer a wide range of quality and affordable clothing, stationery, bags, and even furniture.

ecommerceIQ

Taobao Xinxuan Store Concept Design

From a business model perspective, Taobao Xinxuan is actually more like Xiaomi, the smartphone-manufacturer-turned-global-electronics brand. Its Manufacturer-to-Consumer (M2C) approach and short supply chain allows the company to quickly go from the latest consumer insights to manufacturers to create products and achieve go-to-market in a few months.

ecommerceIQ

Xiaomi Flagship Store in Shanghai

ecommerceIQ

Xiaomi Flagship Store in Shanghai

Arguably, Taobao Xinxuan could be considered a clone of the M2C ecommerce platform launched by Chinese gaming company NetEase called Yanxuan. Since its release in 2016, Yanxuan has seen rapid growth in a unique vertical that avoids direct competition with Alibaba and JD.com.

The Yanxuan model can be described as an ODM (Original Design Manufacturer) model as well. By going directly to Chinese manufacturers creating products for established global brands, NetEase is able to get the same quality while selling at a much lower price by skipping over distributors.

ecommerceIQ

NetEase’s Yanxuan website

By targeting young, mainly urban consumers who value quality and design but are also price sensitive, Yanxuan has been able to achieve rapid growth in the Chinese ecommerce space. The company reached a monthly GMV (gross merchandise volume) of RMB 60 million (about US$9 million) by Q3 2016, only a few months after its initial launch. This allowed Yanxuan to break into the list of top 10 Chinese ecommerce platforms based on GMV.

ecommerceIQ

Yanxuan Home & Living Category

Alibaba’s New Trojan Horse?

For a business to execute the M2C model well, it needs to understand what consumers want and then act on it swiftly. Considered the pioneer in M2C in China, Xiaomi is well known for asking its users directly what they’d like to see in terms of new features and products.

Another company that knows what its users want is – surprise, surprise – Alibaba. Being the largest ecommerce company in China, Alibaba has extensive data on what brands and products people are buying and when and where. This doesn’t even include the additional data it gathers through its other businesses Ant Financial, Ali Health, and its offline Hema supermarkets and ‘New Retail’ initiatives.

Alibaba’s US counterpart Amazon hasn’t shied-away from using its data to introduce its own private label brands to compete directly with the other brands selling on its platform.

“The company now has roughly 100 private label brands for sale on its huge online marketplace, of which more than five dozen have been introduced in the past year alone. But few of those are sold under the Amazon brand. Instead, they have been given a variety of anodyne, disposable names like Spotted Zebra (kids clothes), Good Brief (men’s underwear), Wag (dog food) and Rivet (home furnishings).”

New York Times, ‘How Amazon Steers Shoppers to Its Own Products’

And this move by Amazon isn’t a small pilot project. Amazon private labels have a large impact on revenue:

“The results were stunning. In just a few years, AmazonBasics had grabbed nearly a third of the online market for batteries, outselling both Energizer and Duracell on its site.”

Amazon’s home court advantage gives it a leg up versus other brands:

“Take word searches. About 70 percent of the word searches done on Amazon’s search browser are for generic goods. That means consumers are typing in “men’s underwear” or “running shoes” rather than asking, specifically, for Hanes or Nike.

For Amazon, those word searches by consumers allow it to put its private-label products in front of the consumer and make sure they appear quickly. In addition, Amazon has the emails of the consumers who performed searches on its site and can email them directly or use pop-up ads on other websites to direct those consumers back to Amazon’s marketplace.”

Alibaba has been flying under the radar with regards to any private label initiatives, and for good reason. Unlike Amazon, which started out as a retailer buying and selling products, Alibaba’s Taobao and Tmall properties are pure marketplace plays from the beginning. Because Alibaba’s main goal is helping connect merchants and buyers via its platforms, a neutral stance is essential to the platform’s success.

It’s not surprising then that Alibaba decided to launch Xinxuan as ‘Taobao Xinxuan’ rather than ‘Tmall Xinxuan’. Originally a part of Taobao, Tmall spun off to provide a more premium B2B2C marketplace for authentic brands to sell their products online. Mixing in Xinxuan’s private label products would only upset brands competing in similar product categories.

Lazada’s LazMall a stepping stone towards introducing Lazada private label in Southeast Asia?

Last week, Lazada officially launched LazMall, its Southeast Asian version of Tmall. It’s a move towards splitting Lazada (‘b-to-C’) and LazMall (‘B-to-c’) and aims to offer a premium place for big brands to sell online, away from the grey market sellers on the platform.

ecommerceIQ

From the outside, this looks like an obvious move against JD, known to offer a better customer experience according to our recent Indonesia online marketplace survey.

However, seeing Alibaba’s new concept in China with Taobao Xinxuan, it’s not far-fetched the LazMall spin-off will lead to Lazada M2C private label brands in the near future.

The Chinese ecommerce market, being about 10 years ahead of the Southeast Asian one, acts like a crystal ball for brands operating in our region. Battle-tested brands with operations in China know better to diversify their channels before putting all their eggs into a single basket.

Southeast Asian-native brands are recommended to shake off their naivety and learn from China’s history.

Monogamy in ecommerce does not lead to happiness.

Uber seems to be doing well after its abrupt exit from the competitive Southeast Asia market after selling to local competitor Grab. The ride-hailing company made $2.5 billion in profit on $2.6 billion revenue in Q1 2018.

“Uber gained $2.9 billion after it merged its businesses in Russia and Southeast Asia with local competitors.” – Recode

How has Grab spent this time and opportunistic time to grow market share?

Well, the Singaporean based, ride-hailing Grab celebrates its sixth birthday this year and its founder and CEO Anthony Tan recently took the occasion to announce the launch of its new investment arm: Grab Innovate.

This is a good sign pointing to healthy coffers and without Uber, the company has a relatively a smooth path to a ride-hail/all-in-one super app monopoly in Southeast Asia markets (that are not Indonesia).

A lot has changed since Uber’s exit two months ago.

Grab’s Timeline Following Uber’s Exit

March 25th – Uber exits from Southeast Asia, sells to Grab
May 7th – Grab rolls back discounts for customers and incentives for drivers
May 7th – Grab Singapore launches three new services: GrabAssist, GrabCar Plus and GrabFamily
May 7th – Grab allows cash top up feature in the Philippines
May 17th – Motorbike taxi drivers protest in front of Grab Bike office in Bangkok
May 28th – Grab launches GrabFood in Singapore
June 4th – Grab announces launch of Grab&Go allowing riders to try up to four free samples such as cereal bars, shampoo, etc. during their rides
June 5th – Grab announces launch of Grab Ventures and Velocity

But there has been backlash from various communities – rider and drivers alike – who are disappointed with the company’s recent performance, user experience after only now being forced to use the Grab app.

What are customers unhappy about?

Based on an ecommerceIQ Community survey, the top two ride-hailing providers preferred by customers remain Grab and Uber.

ecommerceIQ

It is also important to keep in mind the top respondents reside in Singapore, Indonesia and Thailand that can skew the results as LINE and Go-Jek aren’t available in Singapore.

When asked about the other value-added services used in addition to ride-hailing, customers chose “Food delivery” and “Package delivery” in second and third place, respectively. Results also revealed the adoption of built-in e-wallets aren’t popular.

ecommerceIQ

And all hell broke loose when customers were asked to ‘speak their mind’ about Grab services in Southeast Asia. These were a few of the replies:

“Functionality not as good as Uber, but improving. Maps not as accurate, main gripe is timings – the estimated times are totally off so really hard to know when to book. Wallet has been useful at hawkers / festivals a couple of times, would use more if that expands.”

“Cannot change the pickup location (sometimes GPS is not accurate) – tried ordering food at 11AM and it said rider not available – got a lot more expensive and waiting got much worse after Uber’s exit.”

Prices has increased dramatically since the merger with Uber; what’s worse is, driver availability has also gone down since.”

Too expensive now. Confusing fare structure and flat rate charged before the trip are more expensive than taking a taxi. Losing UberEATS for GrabFood is the bigger disappointment though – at least Grab’s transport works, the GrabFood UX/UI is the worst app I’ve opened for four years and completely unfriendly to non Thais.”

And a single positive reply:

“Awesome.”

Most common complaints? Terrible UX, inaccurate Maps, lack of drivers and more expensive than before.

Go-Jek to the rescue?

Not quite.

While on-demand in Indonesia is essentially untouchable due to Go-Jek’s market dominance and customer loyalty, the company will struggle to convince other Southeast Asians to download yet another on-demand app when they expand.

But a window of opportunity may be wide open for them if Grab doesn’t improve its user experience (and quickly given Go-Jek’s long-awaited expansion).

ecommerceIQ

Source: GrabFood Apple Store reviews

During our intimate interviews with Jakartians who surprisingly use multiple digital payments, we discovered it is all due to convenience. Because they already use Go-Jek to order everything else on one platform – one app. They don’t want to install more applications on their mobile phones.

Let’s say Go-Jek is able to overcome tricky government regulations, assemble driver fleets, and jump through talent pool hoops, customers trying Go-Jek, already well-known in Indonesia for its superior UX/UI, have access to the company’s all-in-one app services – all in one.

This is an already added plus considering users need to download a separate GrabFood app to order food versus the built in function in Go-Jek’s app.

GoJek’s expansion will also mean users can enjoy lower prices as companies will likely revert back to heavy subsidies to win customers and leading to Grab dropping prices once again.

ecommerceIQ, Consumer Pulse

Source: ecommerceIQ Ride Hailing Survey 2018

Competition is a good thing

Competition encourages businesses to improve the quality of goods and services they sell to attract more customers and expand market share.

“Preparations are well under way and within the next few weeks our first new country launch will be announced. This will be followed by three other countries in Southeast Asia by the middle of the year.” – Nadiem Makarim, CEO and founder of Go-Jek.

Citing the financial and strategic backing of its local and global partners, he added: “We are confident that we have more than enough support to take one of the most amazing growth stories in the world from being an Indonesian phenomenon to a global one.”

Grab should be taking advantage of this brief moment of competitor-less time to become even more user friendly, push revenue limits and popularise its e-wallet, but based on survey results, forgotten to optimise its core value proposition – a seamless ride-hailing experience.

Brace yourselves everyone, we’re in for another on-demand showdown.