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Gone were the days when millennials are the center of attention.

Projected to make up 40% of the global consumer base by 2020, Gen Z, those who were born between 1995 and 2010, is the new focus for brands around the world to market to. In Southeast Asia, this generation accounts for 277 million of the region’s 660 million population, with over 50% spending more than $30 a month on online shopping.

In his book, ‘The Gen Z Frequency: How Brands Tune In and Build Credibility’, Gregg L. Witt’s highlights the needs for brands to look beyond the confines of traditional segmentation and focus on cultivating relationships when targeting the consumers from this cohort as they are driven by sincerity and authenticity from brands and its marketing tactics.

What makes them tick?

Growing up with ready access to the Internet doesn’t make Gen Z be more inclined to do online shopping as the connectivity of it all also make them more impatient. They want what they want when they want it.

However, access to smartphones and the Internet do keep them well informed and they care more about the end-to-end brand experience, especially one that have close ties with their social values.

Being digital-natives, this generation is more attuned to technological development and constantly craving new experiences the technology can provide for their shopping journeys such as voice and visual search. The latter part is especially popular when paired with social media, another influential aspect in the life of Gen-Z. 33% of them said they’ve made a purchase after seeing the production social media.

Snap’s Eagle feature that sends users to Amazon’s app or site to buy the product they scan; TechCrunch

“Because they came of age with online shopping and branded social media campaigns, they have even higher expectations for digital shopping experiences,” – Forbes

Platforms like Facebook and Instagram are already capitalizing on their users. Facebook Marketplace already has 800 million users on its platform, making it one of the biggest competitors to existing marketplaces and increasingly important for brands to turn their social media fan page into a sales channel.

It’s about the experience

In Southeast Asia, it’s increasingly common to see ecommerce players and brands employ more creative tactics in the hope to engage their youngest audience.

Taking a page out of Alibaba’s book, Lazada went all out for their 7th birthday celebration, dubbed as the Lazada Super Party, with the performance from 2019 Grammy winner Dua Lipa and several local celebrities to create a “shoppertainment” experience for their shoppers across the six markets via live-streaming.

Gamification is also a popular strategy used by companies to engage consumers from this generation. From ecommerce players like Lazada, Shopee, and Qoo10, as well as ride-hailing app Go-Jek, they’re all employed in-app games to provide a more interactive way for their consumers to earn rebates and points to shop on the platforms.

The entertainment features e-marketplaces across the region introduced to enhance the in-app experience

Meanwhile, cosmetics brand L’Oreal partners with Watsons to introduce an in-app virtual make-up testing service on Watsons’ mobile application across Asia. The feature lets consumers create their own looks, capture it in photos and videos, then ordered the products they use to create the looks.

These experiences are only some of the examples of a unique selling proposition that can attract this generation and it’s important for brands to be more flexible in trying something new in order to appeal to the consumers. Every generation presents a different challenge for brands to stay relevant and with the authenticity the Gen-Z expects from brands, this generation may take you on the experience of a lifetime.

As the ecommerce trend continues in Southeast Asia, a wave of the new generation of moms is joining the party. These moms are relying more and more on online to help them embrace their role as a parent.

Millennial moms expressed their dependency on online for their shopping journey, especially for the Mom & Baby category, during an ecommerceIQ panel session in Jakarta earlier this month.

ecommerceIQ surveyed 1,144 Indonesian moms with results showing that 66% have attempted to purchase Mom & Baby products online. Shopee was voted as the most popular e-marketplace for this category, followed by Lazada and Tokopedia.

Mom & Baby Indonesia Online Shoppers

aCommerce Group CMO Sheji Ho on stage presenting the findings from ecommerceIQ’s report: Digital Profile Mom & Baby Shoppers in Indonesia.

Indonesian actress and Miss Universe 2007 finalist Agni Pratishta was one of the panelists at the event. She agreed with the findings and also mentioned that most women visit numerous websites to find the best deals.

“I have a group chat with other moms where we exchange information regarding which e-marketplace is having a sale right now,” admitted Agni.

Agni was joined in the panel session with the Head of Marketing Baby Care from Softex Indonesia, Wenny Damayanti, and aCommerce Group CMO Sheji Ho to shed light on the current landscape comprising Mom & Baby online shoppers in Indonesia.

What else did we discover from the event?

Panel session during ecommerceIQ event in Jakarta with Agni Pratistha (middle) and Wenny Damayanti (right).

Indonesian moms shop cautiously online

When Indonesian moms were asked about their favorite online shopping platforms, brand websites did not feature much in their answers, with only Mothercare Indonesia appearing on the radar at a score of 4%.

Digging deeper, the result is most likely related to the type of products they are more likely to buy online in this category. Following general ecommerce trends in the country, Baby Clothing (49%) ranked as the most popular product purchased online in this category, followed by Baby Gear (23%) and Toys (18%).

Mom & Baby Indonesia Online Shoppers

Top products purchased online in Mom & Baby category in Indonesia; ecommerceIQ Mom & Baby Customer Survey in Indonesia (2018)

Meanwhile, perishable goods like Baby Personal Care and Baby Food are less popular and the cause of it is rooted in the main reasons why Indonesian moms don’t shop for this category online.

Mom & Baby Indonesia Online Shoppers

Top reasons for consumers to not shop for Mom & Baby products online; ecommerceIQ Mom & Baby Customer Survey in Indonesia (2018)

More conviction is necessary for consumers to purchase perishable goods online; moms require full assurance of product quality, and one way to avoid buying counterfeit products in the e-marketplace is to purchase only from brands’ official online flagship stores.

The top three consumer-favorite platforms all benefit from their official brand-dedicated portal inside their platform.

Mom & Baby Indonesia Online Shoppers

Tokopedia’s dedicated page for brands’ official store; Tokopedia

The importance of word-of-mouth in the digital world

Brands should always take cues from its consumers to adjust and hone their retail strategy. These include instilling customer confidence to overcome the reservations mentioned above. Wenny revealed that internet habits of millennial mothers provided the driving force for Sweety’s shift to digital.

“These moms are constantly searching for information online. TV commercials alone are no longer sufficient. Modern day moms use the internet to talk to their friends, surf for product information and read customer reviews before deciding which products to buy. Sweety took these cues onboard and redefined its online strategy,” explained Wenny.

Sweety’s official flagship store is offering online exclusive offer on ShopeeMall Indonesia.

Product reviews are a key aspect for Indonesian moms to overcome the wariness of doing their shopping online, as seconded by Agni

“Reviews are the make or break point for me when I shop online. When I see a product in e-marketplace with no review, even if the price is right, I wouldn’t risk buying it most of the time.”

Unfortunately, leaving a product review is not a habit mastered by Southeast Asian consumers yet, especially compared to consumers in developed ecommerce market like the US. And most of the time, Southeast Asians are prone to leave only bad reviews as a way to express their dissatisfaction and to caution other consumers.

Brands must concentrate on encouraging satisfied consumers to be more proactive and do the same. Some brands have utilized user-generated content platforms like ReviewIQ to help with the problem. Nivea, for example, achieved an increase in the number of positive reviews with the help of ReviewIQ from real consumers for its flagship store on Lazada Thailand.

“At this stage, brands still need to incentivize satisfied consumers to help generate good, organic reviews,” says Sheji.

How should Mom & Baby brands go about online?

Sheji stresses the importance of brands understanding the nature of their products and their primary objective to determine the optimal online strategy.

“If your products fall into the luxury category, you might as well sell it on your brand website to retain the full control of your channel. However, this strategy requires you to invest extensively in bringing in traffic,” advised Sheji.

But having a website also means owning a proprietary media channel that can be used for marketing and educational purposes. Brands like Sweety and Frisian Flag, for example, use their sites to connect offline promotion with the online audience as well as equip consumers with detailed product information.

For most brands, however, if the objective is to diversify sales channels, then opening an official flagship store on an e-marketplace like Shopee or Lazada is sufficient and also easier to maintain, while providing access to a broader online consumer base.

Drawing on her extensive experience in promoting Sweety to e-marketplaces, Wenny opined that prioritizing e-marketplace sales avenues is paramount for success. Especially in Indonesia where consumers are presented with many options, and competition between e-marketplaces is high, brands often feel the needs to have ubiquitous footprints.

Wenny summed up, “Choosing the right e-marketplace is an important step in the online expansion. Selection must consider the available audience, while also ensuring that the e-marketplace’s infrastructure is compatible with the business.”

Get the full report of Digital Mom & Baby Shoppers Profile here.

Earlier this month, Shopee launched Shopee for Men in the Philippines, an in-app store offering male-oriented products in various categories, ranging from Electronics and Sports to Fashion and Personal Care.

Figure 1: Landing page for Shopee for Men in the Philippines; Shopee Philippines

Similar to the strategy adopted for the main platform, Shopee for Men offers big discounts to attract the male audience. By leveraging its partnership with brands for ShopeeMall, the platform curates the selected products of numerous leading brands favored by the male population such as Asus, Xiaomi, Bosch, and Spalding. The platform also offered limited sales of the newly released iPhone XS during its promotional period.  

Why did Shopee launch its Men platform in the Philippines?

The Philippines is the third market where Shopee launched its dedicated platform for Men, after the previous launch in Indonesia and Thailand, and it’s not without reason.

The country has a slightly higher male population (53.8 million) than female (52.8 million), and the Filipino male population is forecast to rise over the years steadily. Moreover, most of the Philippines’ population belong the younger generations of millennials and gen-Z. These generations are more likely to be digital-savvy, have higher purchasing power, and more willingness to spend money. In short, the driver of ecommerce growth in the Philippines.

Figure 2: There are more male than female in the Philippines; PopulationPyramid.net

A report from Paypal and Ipsos already forecasts the country’s online spending to increase by 32% in 2018 to $2.2 billion (PHP 121. 9 billion) from $1.7 billion (PHP 92.5 billion) in 2017.

However, online shoppers in the Philippines are still predominantly female, presenting a mostly untapped male audience with stronger purchase power, as found in our latest e-marketplace survey.

Figure 3: Male online shoppers in the Philippines are more likely to spend more per online purchase; ecommerceIQ E-Marketplace Survey Philippines 2018

What do Filipino male consumers usually buy online?

OLX Data Hub found that Filipino male consumers like to shop online for items in categories like furniture, sports, health items, and surprisingly baby-related goods. Millennial men primarily are the driver of this growth.

Figure 4: The top three categories with the highest growth in 2016; OLX Data Hub

Shopee’s Head of Commercial Business Macy Castillo confirms this finding as they discovered men aged 25-30 years old mainly buy wellness, hobbies, and sporting goods. However, they also found that the top purchases among age groups differ.

The 20-24-year-olds group tends to buy more fashion items. This group also shops online more often than other age groups, despite their lower purchasing power since they’re either university students or first-time job seekers.

Meanwhile, skincare and baby & children products are more popular among the 31-35-year-olds group, of whom are more likely to have a family and already in the working force, giving them a higher purchasing ability to buy items that are more costly like wellness and children goods.

Figure 5: Most Filipino men marry at ages 25-29; Philippine Statistics Authority

What’s the most popular online platform for Filipino men?

Generally speaking, Lazada is the most popular B2C e-marketplace preferred by most Filipinos, followed by Shopee and Zalora in the second and third rank, respectively.

Figure 6: Number of visitors to Philippines’ B2C ecommerce platforms in October 2018; SimilarWeb, ecommerceIQ

Women make up for the majority of online shoppers in the Philippines, and it can be seen in these sites’ demographic as well. As such, there are more products available on the site for women than men online.

Figure 7: Lazada, Shopee, and Zalora’s visitors are mainly composed of Filipino women; Alexa

For example, a simple search of “men” in Lazada will give you around 4 million items whereas “women” will display almost triple the number (11.8 million) — showing the disparity in the number of goods available for different genders. A similar search on Shopee will also show the same result, depicting high opportunity for ecommerce companies to appeal to the Filipino male consumers.

Figure 8: Search results on Shopee for “Men” and “Women” on 15 October 2018; Shopee Philippines

According to the same Paypal report, the top two reasons to shop online for Filipino consumers are convenience (82%) and the availability of multiple platforms (52%). By presenting male consumers the same convenience to compare hundreds of similar items within minutes and providing more products for them, we can expect to see a rising influx of Filipino male consumers on these platforms in the coming years.

How can ecommerce websites attract more male shoppers?

Having a website or a dedicated landing page solely for male shoppers is a step in the right direction as it allows them to save time from having to comb through products mainly positioned for females and lets them start shopping immediately.

Although in general men and women shoppers value the same characteristics from online shopping platforms, our survey found the subtle differences that e-marketplaces can use to take advantage of in attracting the male segment.

One of the most important values for male shoppers is site reputation, as they’re less likely to browse through multiple sites everytime they’re doing their shopping. By offering an overall good shopping experience and providing additional values such as same-day delivery, a better mobile app, and easy return policy, e-marketplace have higher chance to convert them to be loyal shoppers.

Figure 9: Comparison of the importance of ecommerce characteristics between men and women; ecommerceIQ E-Marketplace Survey Philippines 2018

Compared to women, men tend to shop less frequently online. But many of them are more willing to shop in full price retailers and spend more money per purchase, illustrating how men might not be as price-sensitive as female consumers.

Online platforms like Shopee need to offer more than just low price to get more men to want to shop online.

Figure 10: Online shopping frequency comparison between men and women; ecommerceIQ E-Marketplace Survey Philippines 2018

It’s early days for the male online shoppers in the Philippines, and the verdict isn’t out yet, but if the data says anything, there’s no doubting the potential of this segment. And if Shopee’s attempt proves to gain enough traction, we can expect more male-oriented online platforms in Southeast Asia in the future.

What is BNK48?

BNK48 is a Thai idol girl group modeled after Japan’s AKB48. Consisting of 52 teen idol members, the Thai group recently rose to prominence and is currently into its second generation.

Who are the most popular BNK48 members?

With so many members, we looked at ecommerce analytics to rank them by popularity. Popularity here being measured using the following proxy metrics from the BNK48 official store on Shopee Mall. Data was provided by ecommerce analytics and reviews platforms BrandIQ and ReviewIQ, respectively.

  • Number of likes
  • Number of reviews
  • Average rating (out of 5 stars)

 

Specifically, we looked at ‘debut photoset’ SKUs as these have a version for each of the BNK48 members.

Results

Based on the number of Likes, the top 5 BNK48 members are:

Based on the number of Reviews, the top 5 BNK48 members are:

Based on Average Rating, the top 5 BNK48 members are:

To be frank, average ratings are probably more a sign of product quality rather than the specific member’s relative popularity. However, we’ll include their average ratings here just for reference.

The top two members are Bamboo and Minmin, both tied with a 4.8 average. They are followed by 12 members tied for second place with a 4.7 average.

[table id=8 /]

Disclaimer

This study was performed with the following limitations in mind:

  • BNK48 second generation has a total of 27 members, but the debut photoset SKUs available on the BNK48 Official Stop on Shopee Mall only covered 22 members
  • Data was collected and analyzed on September 10, 2018. Any other date may have shown or show different numbers
  • Quality of the actual debut photoset product may have influenced the number of purchases, therefore the number of reviews

Takeaways

  • Previously, few tools existed for brands to monitor and analyze the general consumer sentiment. With the increasing popularity of social media, brands started to pay more attention to metrics such as ‘likes’, with tools available to track these metrics
  • However, with ecommerce becoming a bigger part of our daily lives, brands should also look at ecommerce platforms like Lazada and Shopee as a rich and dynamic data set
  • With tools like BrandIQ and ReviewIQ, brands can track and analyze consumer behavior and sentiment on marketplaces, in addition to tracking their own performance as well as benchmarking against competitors selling similar products

The fourth quarter is always the busiest season for retailers and brands across the world, Southeast Asia is no exception. The wave of mega sales typically observed offline during Black Friday in December have moved online thanks to prolific marketplaces like Amazon, Alibaba and Lazada. These campaigns now occur consecutively on 9.9, 11.11, and 12.12 (September 9th, November 11th, and December 12th) and cause headaches for brands new to ecommerce.

Businesses must plan ahead well in advance with multiple partners to hit their annual online revenue targets as up to 40% of GMV can be generated in the last three months of the year.

To help brands make the best of the shopping season, these are 10 strategies based on experience working with e-marketplaces, talking to ecommerce enablers, and data from some of the biggest brands across Southeast Asia.

While this guide is most applicable to enhancing performance during the upcoming “mega online sales campaigns” held by players like Lazada and Shopee in Southeast Asia, brands can increase chances to maximize sales and minimize costly mistakes with the findings.

Let’s dive right in.

1. Promotions & Merchandising

Getting this part right may sound trivial but it’s the main ingredient for a successful sales campaign. If the product offering clashes with offline deals and/or pricing is weak, no matter how much is spent on marketing, there will unlikely be high sales volumes

This is akin to achieving product-market fit prior to scaling your business.

So how should brands approach this? Well, what are brands trying to get out of these mega sales – revenues or general visibility/awareness?

In the case of the former, brands need to secure prime real estate on a marketplace such as the homepage or category page, which are typically allocated based on attractive discounts, online traffic and cash vouchers.

In order to drive revenue, exclusive “doorbuster” deals are especially important when top competitors – official and grey market sellers alike – selling similar or identical items are dropping prices.

Mass market brands are free to offer discounts, whereas premium market brands cannot use discounting as a viable strategy (channel conflict) and should look at adding value via bundling and exclusive GWP (Gift With Purchase). These tactics work well without having to tarnish the brand in the long-term.

In the case of visibility/awareness, more budget should be allocated to advertising and promotions to drive traffic to an upgraded shop-in-shop design to make a good first impression on new shoppers.

Brands can also utilize data tools to evaluate their positive in a competitive landscape (examples include BrandIQ) and benchmark competitor SKUs, promos and pricing ahead of the online sales festival.

ecommerce holiday strategies

BrandIQ Marketplace Analytics & Digital Shelf Monitoring

Planning and approval of the pricing strategy for end year – final list of SKUs, pricing, bundles and GWPs – will take the longest time. The brand then needs to share this plan ahead of a ‘freezing period’ to let marketplaces like Lazada and Shopee evaluate and approve the campaigns. And relative to the e-marketplaces other seller applications, it will allocate site visibility.

2. Inventory & Stock

Once SKUs and pricing is set, brands need to ensure there is enough physical stock to meet the forecasted demand.

This requires scrubbing historical data, if available, and use proxy data points like offline channel sales if not.

With a forecast in place, products are ordered and inbounding slots at partner or brand fulfillment centers are reserved and dedicated to online sales. This should all be completed at minimum two weeks in advance.

Lastly, brands should set up automatic ‘out of stock’ triggers to receive emails and SMS whenever a product sells out. This can also be applied strategically to competitor SKUs too through tools like BrandIQ – this allows ecommerce store managers to respond with targeted pricing promotions whenever a key competitor SKU runs out.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Price change triggers in BrandIQ

3. Traffic Acquisition

A common dilemma faced by brands during sales season is whether or not to double down on marketing spend.

CPCs (cost-per-clicks) are typically higher during a period when other brands are prioritizing and spending aggressively on marketing. The idea behind this is returns tend to be higher too because of higher conversion rates resulting from more competitive SKUs, pricing and bundles.

If a brand can afford it, it’s recommended to increase spending during the sales season. In addition, a “warm-up” or teaser campaign prior to the big launch is also recommended and actually required by marketplaces like Lazada.

Brands also perform better when leveraging an existing customer email database or mobile phone list or building them using formats like Facebook Lead Ads well before the shopping season, when CPCs are still relatively low.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Facebook Lead Ads to build up email database ahead of the sales season

With this targeted database, brands can drive traffic during the sales campaign by sending emails or SMS to the list with promo codes to be used online during targeted dates.

While barter deals are more effective for brands to gain better on-site visibility, it’s also recommended to allocate budget to marketplace paid ads such as Lazada Sponsored Products and Shopee My Ads. These ad formats are still affordable compared to Facebook and Google ads and help acquire users when they’re already in a shopping mindset. They also help brands stand out on category pages as well as competitor product detail pages.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee My Ads

But when multiple brands are fighting for the same site banner placements, exclusivity and doorbuster deals are prioritized by marketplaces over sponsored ads.

Beyond the typical Facebook and Google paid ads to drive traffic, brands can also look into non-conventional channels such as Quora Ads and Shopback. CPCs and CPAs (cost-per-acquisition) are often lower due to less competition.

4. Traffic Activation & Conversion

Driving traffic is not enough; they need to convert into sales. To do this, brands have several levers to pull.

First, upgrade to an official shop-in-shop format if not yet done already. Commission fees will increase but this format goes beyond just a badge as it improves product search ranks and peace of mind for shoppers worried about authentic goods.

Maybelline Official LazMall Shop-in-Shop on Lazada Thailand

High-conversion shop-in-shop layouts. Source: aCommerce Shop-in-Shop Design Gallery.

The typical customer journey on marketplaces goes from the shop-in-shop homepage → category pages → product detail pages (PDPs).

The product detail pages is where customers need to be incentivized to “add to cart”. PDP optimization requires descriptive and rich product titles, images, body content, etc.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA product detail page optimization

One important element of PDPs are customer ratings and reviews. Unfortunately, most reviews on marketplaces in Southeast Asia tend to be few and often, not very helpful. To acquire more high quality reviews, either connect the brand.com product reviews/ratings to the Lazada product page or if no brand.com exists, leverage tools such as ReviewIQ to generate more reviews for certain SKUs on Lazada and Shopee.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA customer reviews generated via ReviewIQ

Another driver for conversions is live chat offered by both Lazada and Shopee. This is a great opportunity to increase conversions, especially for more expensive or complex products that require product detail exchange between the buyer and the merchant.

With an estimated one-third of ecommerce transactions in Thailand happening through Instagram, Facebook and LINE, users have come to expect live chat in other B2C channels as well.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada Thailand live chat

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee live chat

For brands selling directly to customers via their own brand.com sites, an abandoned cart email should be active to regain lost revenue as well as retargeting pixels to drop cookies for a retargeting campaign during and right after the mega sales period.

5. Customer Service

From a CS perspective, brands need to prepare their customer service team on best-selling product details, pricing and overall campaign. In addition, having a master FAQ document or wiki that’s circulated ahead of time will allow CS teams or a dedicated agent to operate more efficiently during the campaign period.

If allowed, brands may want to scale up CS staff with temporary labor accounting for the increase in demand during the sales period. This should be tied back to the demand forecast. Platforms like Helpster in Thailand and Indonesia offer brands an easy way to quickly ramp up temporary staff.

6. Monitoring

A large and often negative impact on a brand’s performance online is the abundance of grey market sellers that undercut product prices.

As marketplaces aren’t incentivized to remove grey sellers selling authentic products and will only delist pirated goods, brands can only focus on improving their own product selection, search rank and educating its consumers on its official online channels.

In addition to raising concerns to the marketplace on removing counterfeit goods, brands can use BrandIQ to track grey market SKUs or other brands that impact its promotions, e.g. Mimi Poko vs. Mamy Poko:

ecommerce holiday strategies

Mimi Poko on Lazada Thailand

7. Packaging

Packaging seems mundane in comparison to the other sales levers but it’s a customer touch point to increase repurchase rates. In addition to an eye-pleasing design and quality of the packaging itself, promotions via flyers or vouchers to drive follow-up actions such as cross-sell and up-sell.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Pedigree box design

8. Fulfillment & Delivery

Customers value packages to be delivered in a quick and efficient manner.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada customer chat with merchant complaining about expected delivery times.

For brands to succeed here in the last mile, we recommend the following:

  • Organize the warehouse set up at least one week ahead of time – reserved inbound, outbound slots – to ensure delivery to customers within SLA
  • Give the warehouse the estimated order volume factoring in marketing, promotions, and competition well ahead of time
  • Prepare enough packaging material such as carton boxes, bubble wrap, packing foam, etc. to meet forecasted demand
  • Align with 3PLs to ensure its capabilities to pick up and deliver packages given the high volume
  • Prepare an on-demand delivery resource in case of over-capacity, e.g. LINEMAN, Grab Delivery

9. Business Operations

Ecommerce is a cross-functional, team-based effort, especially during the mega sales period where tight-knit coordination is the difference between hitting record highs or dropping the ball:

  • Set up war room dedicated to a cross-functional team that manages all operations during the campaign period. Prepare food because it’s going to be long stretches of day and night and weekends as 9.9 and 11.11 both happen on Sunday
  • The team needs to proactively monitor active campaigns during the day to ensure everything is synced properly, e.g. stock, price, etc. and may even needs to reply quickly to customer chats if CS is overwhelmed
  • Marketing and store managers to check all campaign landing pages after launch. Last thing needed is money spent on driving traffic to 404 pages
  • Debrief / post-mortem for the next big sale (right around the corner)

10. Website Stability

To avoid mishaps such as Amazon’s very own Prime Day meltdown, these tips apply only if a brand is running its own brand.com site, not marketplace shop-in-shop:

  • 2-3 weeks prior to peak period, perform a load test (also known as a stress test) to determine the traffic limits of your existing infrastructure setup. This will arm you with the knowledge of server limits and determine benchmark for an upgrade
  • Upgrade server processing power and network bandwidth 24-48 hours ahead of campaign day to be able to handle the spike in traffic
  • Test promotions, for sanity and determine if any loopholes
  • Enforce a code freeze period (no deployments) to reduce the risk of introducing bugs from new features during or prior to peak period
  • Prior to, communicate to web support teams to be readily available and on standby for peak trading. Hope for the best, prepare for the worse

But regardless of the above, performance will be determined by the right online channel for your brand or product category. Based on ecommerceIQ research, Shopee is a preferred platform by consumers for female-oriented categories like fashion and mom and baby items, whereas Lazada is preferred for categories such as electronics and home appliances.

Sign up here to download a Holiday Flash Sale preparation report.

Brands without inhouse ecommerce capabilities tend to work with ecommerce enablers to optimize their online performance. Contact us for a free consulting session: hello@ecommerceIQ.asia

Asian lovers don’t seem to shy away from Valentine’s day.

According to Mastercard, 75% of mainland Chinese are likely to buy a gift for their partner on this amorous occasion, followed by 74% of Thai, and 63% of Malays and Filipinos.

They’re shelling out hefty sums too.

Chinese residents indicated they would spend an average of US$310, closely trailed by Hong Kong at US$282 and Taiwan with US$281.

Filipinos don’t spend as much as some of their other Asian counterparts, but they’re ranked as some of the most romantic in the region.

An Orient McCann study revealed that Filipinos are the most emotional people in the world and second among those who most frequently say “I love you”, making Valentine’s Day an ideal event to let their feelings be known.

Google Trends data for the past week show interest in Valentine’s Day from the Philippines reaching a zenith as we approach the day itself.

Search interest is escalating fast.

What are Filipinos searching for online? And how can brands leverage this information?

Analyzing customer preferences in The Philippines

ecommerceIQ surveyed 500 Filipinos with access to the internet in an effort to understand how they prepare for Valentine’s Day.

87.2% of those surveyed said they intend to purchase a gift to mark the occasion, whereas only 12.8% indicated that they had no plans to do so.

But it’s not so straightforward.

63.9% of survey respondents said their eventual purchase would take place offline.

Within this subset, 42.8% said both the search and purchase would happen in-store and 21.1% outlined that their purchase journey would start online by searching for products but would be followed by a visit to their local mall.

36.1% of the people surveyed said they’re comfortable transacting online, mainly because of better deals & discounts, as well as the option of scheduling delivery at a particular time.

The most popular gifts sought by Filipinos for Valentine’s Day were surprisingly clothes at number one, followed by chocolates, and perfumes.

Flowers ranked a distant fourth – likely because the price of flowers in Manila tends to spike by 500% on or right before Valentine’s Day.

There’s no real substitute for red roses but consumers have a plethora of options when it comes to clothing and perfumes, leading to price stability.

What’s preventing Filipinos from purchasing online?

According to the survey results, more than 75% of respondents exhorted that they prefer to see the product before buying it.

A further 17% said they can’t trust the quality of products they see online or that they’ve been subjected to scams. Only 5% thought malls offer better deals & discounts.

Lazada was the overwhelming favorite among those who did purchase online. Almost 60% of respondents said they’d shop for Valentine’s Day gifts from the popular etailer. Shopee came in second, with 22.2%.

Despite the fact that the most sought-after gift was clothes, pure-play fashion ecommerce site Zalora secured only 4.4% of the vote.

Photo credit: Maxpixel

Capturing love online

Filipino preferences are indicative of a larger trend engulfing global ecommerce markets.

“It’s very hard to launch a brand these days that’s just online-only,” explains Sucharita Mulpuru, analyst at Forrester Research. “It’s an incredibly difficult and crowded ecommerce environment.”

Filipino brands have consistently tried to latch on to prevailing sentiments during Valentine’s Day to either sell more products or increase brand awareness.

Popular fast food joint Jollibee launched a successful campaign last year playing on themes of unrequited love and eventual reunification.

The ads, which were released in three parts, went viral on social media with over 50 million views on Facebook alone.

Condom manufacturer DKT Health gave away nearly 40,000 condoms in Manila during the Valentine’s Day weekend in 2015 by partnering with stalls selling balloons, chocolates, and roses.

Southeast Asian brands are cognizant of this dynamic, at least in Thailand. David Jou, the CEO and co-founder of Pomelo wrote in 2016 about how he viewed offline as a key component of his business moving forward.

“[…] is our goal to be the biggest online fast fashion brand or is our goal to be the biggest fast fashion brand?”, he said, posing an apparent challenge to his team.

Brands in mature ecommerce markets have already started to take a similar route too. Zara opened a pop-up shop in London last month to support its ecommerce channel. Staff at the store were trained to assist with online orders – shoppers can walk in, examine the inventory, receive recommendations from assistants, and eventually pay for the goods they like. But all the products they purchase are shipped to their address.

For companies looking to capitalize on the visible potential and consumer intent to purchase, they’ll have to overcome the prevalent trust barrier currently impeding ecommerce. A consistent online-offline retail experience could very well be a significant first step in doing so.