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One hundred two billion dollars. That’s how much the value of ecommerce in Southeast Asia is estimated to exceed by 2025.

The latest e-Conomy of Southeast Asia report by Google and Singapore-based Temasek confirmed the growing confidence among investors in the region. Startups raised $9.1 billion in the first half of last year, almost as much as throughout the whole of 2017.

2018 was dubbed as the year of ecommerce for the region, so what can we expect in 2019? We speak to industry leaders to discover the anticipated trends for online retailers and brands in Southeast Asia.

1. Brands Shift Their Focus from Data Gathering to Data Utilization

The biggest differentiator between online and offline retail is the ability to track, collect, monitor, and manage information, all in real time.

Through online channels, brands are able to access customer data through chats, social media, and their own websites. This information can be used to devise online strategies. Globally, 73% of brands plan to allocate their ecommerce budget on data & analytics services in 2019.

However, despite the general agreement of its importance, many brands still have no concept of how to utilize data to their advantage.

“Even today, not all retailers have embraced data fully to the point where they think of themselves as data companies, and this might be why many companies are suffering.” Harvard Business School Professor Srikant M. Datar.

Data collection is easy but having and optimizing the analytics capability to use it is a completely different ball game.

A survey by ecommerceIQ identified data analysis as one of the most difficult skills to find among the digital talents in Southeast Asia. Brands are constantly searching for data aggregators to consolidate information into one place for convenient retrieval and use to target, retarget, and personalize products and services.

Reagan Chai, Head of Regional Business Intelligence and Business Development at Shopee told ecommerceIQ that data acquisition enables the company to map out and optimize buyer and seller user experience while pre-empting customer demand and anticipating future potential. The company has seen an increase in website traffic in the past year that even surpasses the other regional players.

In China, Alibaba and JD.com have taken this a step further by utilizes the data gathered online to improve inventories and experiences at their physical stores. Alibaba Chief Marketing Officer, Chris Tung said the company wants to help brands find the right consumers by tracking them throughout Alibaba’s system.

“We’re finding all data that has to do with people, their behavior, what they like, what they buy and binding this online data to real people,” concluded Chris.

Seeing the need, regional brand ecommerce enabler aCommerce launched a data analytics platform BrandIQ last year to enhance their capabilities as a data partner to help brands centralize their customer data and offer customized products or services to each target group.

The capabilities of BrandIQ that aim to enhance brands’ performance on online marketplace; BrandIQ

This leaves brands with two options: find an economical way to utilize the data or continue looking for a needle in a haystack.

2. Social Commerce Channels are Brands’ New Sales Outlets

Social commerce in this region boomed before the rise of ecommerce as we know now.

Facebook groups have long established as an online space where people connect to buy and sell goods, even before the launched of Marketplace feature. The social media’s rapid growth in Southeast Asia is propelled by mobile adoption and smartphone, where 90% of the online population access the internet via smartphones. For some, Facebook even defines the internet itself.

With multitudes of potential customers gathered in social media platforms, brands naturally espied alternative sales channels. Following Facebook’s footsteps, social platforms like Instagram and Pinterest have also developed their own shoppable features.

“Brands will miss out if they don’t have a social media presence. The best way to get feedback from consumers is by having a direct conversation,” Deb Liu, Vice President, Facebook Marketplace told Forbes.

LINE recently acquired a social commerce management startup Sellsuki in Thailand, where it has the second biggest user base, to build a strong foundation for its ecommerce business. The company has also formed a joint venture with three local banks to offer personalized loans to SMEs.

A few big brands like L’Oreal have already equipped their social media page with ‘Shop’ feature that allows consumers to purchase the order directly on the page and it’s only a matter of time before more brands activate the platforms as one their sales channels and remove another layer between them and the consumers.

Consumers can purchase L’Oreal products on their Facebook page assisted through the Messenger app until the checking out process; L’Oreal Thailand.

3. E-Marketplaces Launch New Services to Differentiate

Looking at the successful existing ecommerce players in more developed markets, one key success factor they share is the various services rolled out on their fully-controlled supply chain.

JD.com’s investment to the development of their own supply chain allows them to scale their technology and offer Retail-as-a-Service proposition to help other retailers or brands sell online. Alibaba is unrivaled on its extensive ecosystem beyond commerce, including a logistics network Cainiao, a payment firm Ant Financial, not to mention its recent foray into the entertainment industry.

The same practice has infiltrated down to Southeast Asia. Lazada has strengthened its logistics arm FBL (Fulfilled by Lazada) post the acquisition, and although no concrete plans have been disclosed, Shopee has expressed the intention to build its own logistics network.

Singapore’s Qoo10 is set to launch its blockchain-based ecommerce site QuuBee this year, leveraging the blockchain technology to eliminate the transaction and listing fee which in turn increase the retailers’ profit margin and make a more sustainable commerce approach.

In Indonesia, Tokopedia is set to offer “Infrastructure-As-a-Service” with the fresh $1.1 billion funding. They also plan to use AI for customer care services and to run credit checks on merchants seeking loans to expand their businesses.

The practice is not exclusively done by the general e-marketplaces. Fashion e-marketplace Zilingo scored $226 million in funding due to their new focus to build a network of fashion supply chain that anyone, small merchants or big retailers, can tap into.

“It’s imperative for us to build products that introduce machine learning and data science effectively to SMEs while also being easy to use, get adopted and scale quickly. We’re re-wiring the entire supply chain with that lens so that we can add the most value,” revealed Zilingo CTO Dhruv Kapoor to TechCrunch.

Facebook is also showing more intention to jump into the bandwagon that is the region’s ecommerce. The social network has launched Marketplace feature in Thailand and Singapore without much fanfare, but the recent partnership with Kasikorn Bank in Thailand to allow in-app payment feature might be the start of the company’s effort to bulk up its commerce capabilities and cater to those that utilized the platform for their business.

Facebook partners with Thailand’s Kasikorn Bank to enable transfers and card payments on chats from Facebook Messenger; Facebook

 

In a bid to recruit more brands to sell on their platforms, we anticipate that e-marketplaces will continue to go head-to-head with each other through new services, acquisitions, and partnerships. Ready to burn more cash to win in this battle, e-marketplaces?

4. Brands to Reinforce Reviews and Fund User-Generated Content to Win Ecommerce Consumers

E-marketplaces in Southeast Asia has been upscaling and building add-ons which provide consumers with the utmost convenience. The search for better technology and assistance for the consumers is constant and never-ending.

Lazada introduces AI-powered image search feature onto its platform which allows shoppers to take a picture of an item and the platform will suggest similar items available; LiveatPC

Online consumers begin their online purchasing journeys by searching for product information or reading reviews, usually on the e-marketplace platforms, before making their purchase decision. They are looking for real opinions and user-generated reviews to validate the products.

The habit of leaving product reviews on ecommerce platform is not as common in Southeast Asia as it is in the US — Amazon even have dedicated page for top reviewers — and when they do, the reviews usually left little information about the product and more about the other aspect of the purchase (i.e. delivery time, packaging, etc).

Platforms like ReviewIQ are used by brands to increase their ratings and reviews engagement on their e-marketplace listings to help boost consumers make their decision. While the use of chatbots is an increasingly popular solution to help smooth the online customer experience, it’s more suitable for generic questions such as “where is my order?” or “is this product available?” instead of personalised questions such as “will this lipstick look good on a yellow-undertone skin?”.

Community-crowd model like one that’s popular with travel platforms such as Airbnb might also be suitable for ecommerce in the region to help consumers get passed their apprehension with online shopping — something that Edouard Steinert, aCommerce Thailand’s Director of Channel Management, is investigating to help the company’s clients as this model has shown to save time, increase results, and keep costs low.

“Consumers today want to hear genuine feedback and reviews about a product and become more averse to hard-sell methods. [User-generated] Reviews, especially from people who share the same passion with them, proved to drive better conversion for the brand,” added Edouard Steinert.

5. Brands Employ Direct-to-Consumer strategies to Acquire Direct Consumer Data

89% of companies are now competing mostly on a customer experience playing field and the Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) approach is becoming more important for brands as it allows them to gain insights into their end users and anticipate their needs.

One trend observed among brands to promote DTC is ecommerce subscription. From a consumer perspective, subscription offers a convenient, personalized, and often cheaper way to buy what they need. For brands, it’s a subtle method to create customer loyalty in the digital landscape.

One brand adopting subscription ecommerce in the region is Nescafe Dolce Gusto, offering free coffee machines in exchange for a minimum 12-month subscription. Besides witnessing sales growth, Nescafe Dolce Gusto also noticed that consumers continued to purchase goods from its brand despite dropping out of the subscription plan.

“They may have dropped out of the subscription but not the brand. They still buy capsules from different channels; ecommerce website, online marketplaces, and supermarkets. A subscription strategy is not just a long-term consumption enabler but also a consumer acquisition channel for the whole brand,” Bhuree Ackarapolpanich, Brand Director & Digital Expert at Nescafé Dolce Gusto.

aCommerce’s Regional Director of Project Management, Mandy Arbilo said that e-sampling is a popular strategy employed by brands to evaluate the demand, especially ecommerce.

While normal sampling techniques used by offline retailers are expensive, e-sampling saves brands up to 40% as well as providing essentials customer data.

Mars Petcare is one of the e-sampling pioneers for aCommerce. The campaign prompted up to 25% of pet owners to try Pedigree as the main meal; aCommerce

As DTC becomes widely adopted, consumers will see brands coming up with attractive gimmicks using digital tools to gain insights and entice consumers to spend more on their brands.

6. 2019 Will Finally see Regulation of Ecommerce across the Region

Ecommerce practice in the region has remained largely unregulated as a nascent occurrence. As the industry grows, it is only a matter of time until governments step in to tax this fast-growing segment and level the playing field for foreign companies to offer digital services and goods locally.

News of the implementation of ecommerce tax regulations in Southeast Asian countries has been floating around since the beginning of last year but nothing concrete has as yet materialized.

A couple of months ago, Economic Ministers from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) signed an agreement to facilitate cross-border ecommerce transactions within the region.

However, while nothing has written in stone, predictions abound concerning the impacts of ecommerce tax on imported goods into the region. In Indonesia and Thailand, ecommerce tax is predicted to bolster the growth of social commerce because, unlike marketplaces, they are uncontrolled.

“If tax regulations restrict ecommerce platforms, making selling in Bukalapak complicated, there will be an exodus of people who prefer selling on Instagram and Facebook. These platforms are uncontrolled and not chased for tax because they sell through the back door,” Bukalapak co-founder and Chief Financial Officer Muhamad Fajrin Rasyid.

Singapore might also see a decrease in cross-border shopping as prices increase with the introduction of Goods and Service Tax (GST) on ecommerce goods and services from overseas. Currently, 89% of all cross-border transactions in the Asia Pacific region are conducted by Singaporeans.

A snapshot of the state of ecommerce tax regulations across six major Southeast Asian markets; ecommerceIQ

Looking at another high-potential ecommerce market, India introduces the new e-marketplace laws that indicate the prohibition of marketplace “owners” to sell products on their own marketplace through vendor entities in which they have an equity interest. It also prevents marketplaces to make deals with sellers that grants the marketplace exclusivity rights on the product. Could we see such laws be applied in Southeast Asia?

Regardless, brands will have very little influence on how the new tax policies take root but they will be behooved to anticipate the ruling and adjust online strategy accordingly to mitigate the impact of a shift in customer behavior. This ASEAN agreement will encourage more local entrepreneurs to create new products and venture online to access a larger and more diverse market. Brands will now need to be nimble and innovative to adapt to local nuances and preferences.

7. Grab and Go-Jek Challenge Logistics Providers to Capture Ecommerce and Online Food Delivery

Since Uber’s exit last March, Grab monopoly in countries like Thailand, the Philippines, and Malaysia has led to complaints about services and prices increased which resulted in protests from consumers and fines from governments which hit the headlines of the Filipino newspapers and Singaporean watchdogs.

But with the recent regional expansion from Indonesia’s Go-Jek, the competition between the two will only get fiercer. Go-Jek has successfully carved its existence in Vietnam, Singapore, and Thailand last year alone. In addition, Grab’s competitor in Malaysia, Dacsee, has also expressed the plan of expanding to Thailand.

Both companies are not racing to be the best ride-hailing providers, they’re aiming for something much bigger; super apps. Go-Jek has secured $1 billion funds from Google, Tencent, and JD.com in part of their plan to raise $2 billion for this venture. Meanwhile, Grab recently nabbed $200 million investment from Thailand’s Central Group, boosting their valuation to 11 billion to date.

2019 will see these two competitors steer toward the same goal of food and ecommerce delivery. Google and Temasek reported that the online food delivery business grew 73% CAGR in 2019. By 2025, they predict online food delivery growth at 36% CAGR with online transport only 23%.

Market size of the ride-hailing industry in Southeast Asia; e-Conomy SEA 2018 Report by Google and Temasek

“We will be expanding our GrabFood and delivery business and deepening our relationships with restaurant merchants and key partners in some markets,” said Grab’s head of regional operations Russell Cohen.

Same-day delivery providers are going to feel more competition next year. The impact of Grab and Go-Jek on market vibes will definitely raise the bar for the logistics and delivery sector.

8. Brands and Retailers will Double Down on Omnichannel is Southeast Asia’s Preference over Pure-Play Ecommerce

The omnichannel shopping experience is not a new concept, but companies do have diverse interpretations of the concept. Headlines revealed that online retail behemoths, such as Amazon and Alibaba, are moving into physical retail.

The main reason why Alibaba ventured out of online space reflects its determination to solve core problems of the shopping experience, such as scattered operations and lack of payment transparency.

JD.com pipped Alibaba for once by opening the first unmanned convenience store in the region in Jakarta to leverage the enormous database by offering beneficial insights to brands such as the best products to stock and advertise. Through their JV with Central Group in Thailand, JD Central also planning a similar launch in the country by 2020.

Inside JD.ID X Mart in Indonesia. It is JD.com’s first unmanned store outside of China and it is a demonstration of JD.com’s mission to implement RaaS; Food Navigator Asia

Pure-play ecommerce retailers and brands recognized drawbacks in online marketing channels with fragmented infrastructure and a limited pool of shoppers. They promoted offline as an attractive option to push sales growth.

Elsewhere in Southeast Asia, companies are slowly but surely adopting this strategy across all categories. Ecommerce fashion players like Thailand’s Pomelo and Singapore’s Love, Bonito have opened physical stores in their respective countries.

In 2018, Pomelo opened 5 new outlets, embarking away from Bangkok’s prime shopping areas to central business districts (CBDs) like Asoke and residential areas of Bangna. Meanwhile, Love, Bonito has 17 retail outlets spread across Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Cambodia.

Rachel Lim, Co-Founder of Love, Bonito told Peak Magazine, “Data can tell you what’s selling but being on the ground tells you why something is not selling and what the customer is looking for.”

Visiting shopping malls is a popular social activity in Southeast Asia and this trend is not set to disappear anytime soon. Brands should take advantage of dual physical and online presence.

Updated (28 Feb 2019): Shopee Thailand does not have a solid plan to build its own logistics network yet. The comment was mentioned briefly in the interview with Bangkok Post which was made a focal point by the media.

In this day and age, a mobile phone can do more than making a phone call; it records the time, takes pictures, orders meals and even measures your heart rate. Who needs a watch these days?

You may be surprised to learn that even though 81.4% of Thais own a mobile phone, many still wear wrist watches.

Mobile phone user penetration in Thailand; eMarketer.com

What do Thais Look for when Buying a Wrist Watch?

Out of the 877 Thai respondents, 94.9% wore a watch and more than half (56.0%) owned three watches or more. Data from the ecommerceIQ Wrist Watch Survey Thailand 2018 indicated that watches remain a necessary accessory among Thai consumers with demand still high despite a large number of smartphone users. Statista reported a total of 25.75 million smartphone users in Thailand but the days of the wristwatch are not yet over.

Apart from the obvious reasons to tell the time (62.5%), 13.5% also wore a wristwatch as an accessory. Male respondents especially mentioned that wearing watches was the easiest and classiest way to look good. Around 8.6% cited that wearing a watch reflected their status and style and helped to boost their confidence.

For this reason, design was naturally the most important factor that Thais considered when buying a wristwatch, followed by price and brand name. Brand name also reflected status and personal style. For example, Rolex is still highly regarded as a prestigious timepiece brand in Thailand. Wearing a Rolex advertises high income and social status.

Price, naturally, is another high-ranking factor. Watches are deemed as expensive accessories and not something to be bought on an impulse. Thais only buy new watches every few years (58.7%). Most respondents indicated that they were comfortable to spend around 1,000-30,000 baht on a wristwatch.

Factors that Thai respondents look for when buying a watch; ecommerceIQ Wrist Watch Survey Thailand 2018

The top three watch brands preferred by Thai respondents were Seiko (25.6%), Casio (21.6%), and Omega and Rolex (10.9%).  What do we learn from this ranking?

  • Seiko is a Japanese company that revolutionized the industry and is known for its long history of watchmaking. Prices range from 5,000 to 30,000 baht and the brand is popular among 20K-50K baht income earners.
  • Casio offers a diverse product assortment and brands including G-SHOCK and Baby G. Casio are known for their affordable but attractive designs.
  • Rolex and Omega are popular among consumers aged 40 and above. These two brands are preferred by the older generation, while youngsters opt for IWC or Tag Heuer as luxury timepieces.
  • Daniel Wellington, is a hipster brand that rose to popularity fast and won the hearts of the younger generation. Up to 75% of respondents aged 18-25 wore this brand. Tag Heuer is also popular amongst the 31-40 age group.

When asked about the media channels they used for news and information about timepieces, 48% of the respondents stated that they received news from social media with 33.7% using brand websites.

In Thailand, 74% of the population are active social media users, as reported by ETDA 2017. Thus, it does not come as a surprise that social media was the main channel respondents used for news concerning watches. Brand websites offer more genuine and trustworthy news about the brand itself.

Media channels that Thais use for news about wrist watches; ecommerceIQ Wrist Watch Survey Thailand 2018

Where do Thais Buy Wrist Watches?

Despite the heavy usage of the Internet to consume news, 76.7% of Thais still buy wrist watches from offline stores. The most popular offline channel used by 55.5% of the Thai respondents was Central Department Store because of the store’s credibility.

Like most department stores in Thailand, Central Department has a dedicated section for wristwatch sales. Apart from their reliable reputation, buying a wrist watch from Central Department Store is very easy and convenient. Up to 19% of the respondents looked for convenience and a holistic service, especially regarding after-sales service when buying a watch. Every Central Department Store has a ‘Watch & Clock Clinic’ that offers after-sales service for watches bought from the store.

Watch & Clock Clinic at Central Department Store, Pinklao Branch

Only 23.3% of the respondents bought wrist watches online. Lazada received the highest scores in terms of an online sales channel where Thais buy watches. The second preferred option would be the brand website, due to its credibility.

The online channels Thai respondents choose to buy watches from; ecommerceIQ Wrist Watch Survey Thailand 2018.

 

Similar to other product categories, the top reason cited for opting for online channels was because of convenience; ecommerce saves time and is hassle-free. On the other hand, some Thai respondents refrained from buying wrist watches online due to a perceived lack of credibility in the sellers and/or marketplaces. Offering a warranty and after-sales service are also factors that some online sellers fail to provide.

Reasons why Thai respondents bought wrist watches from online channels; ecommerceIQ Wrist Watch Survey Thailand 2018

It is also interesting to note how wrist watches are listed by Lazada and Shopee websites as each has a slight difference. From our observations, watches are only found in the ‘watch and glasses’ category on Shopee, while Lazada lists watches under: Electronic accessories, women’s fashion, and men’s fashion. This provides users with more exposure to the products and hence higher conversion to sales.

On the Lazada website, users are able to see watches listed on the e-marketplace more frequently and in more sections than at Shopee. Lazada, watches can be found under Electronics as wearables and accessories, which is also categorized into male, female and child timepieces.

Shopee, on the other hand, only offers watches under the watches and glasses category, and does not categorize watches for different demographics like Lazada.

How Can Watch Brands Take Advantage?

Watches are deemed as a luxury item by Thais. More often than not they are bought as an investment. Thais look for credibility and confidence from the seller, as well as a warranty proving that the timepiece bought is authentic.

It is not enough to list your products on a marketplace and engage in advertising campaigns. Rather, brands should focus on establishing confidence among consumers. One way to ensure this is to be listed as an official seller on LazMall or Shopee Mall, as well as including a clear statement about warranty and after-sales service conditions.

For luxury timepiece manufacturers, an e-marketplace may not be the ideal strategy as it may conflict with the brand’s positioning. Luxury brands should focus on providing beyond-expectation services and ascertaining that information is clearly visible on their websites.

As watches are still mainly sold offline, now is the right time for brands to give omnichannel a try. Take Burberry for example. They created the Burberry Retail Theatre that streams live runway shows into a number of their stores worldwide and through their other online channels. In the Retail Theatres, customers can browse live streaming collections on iPads and purchase items online immediately.

Burberry’s Runway to Reality campaign allowing consumers to order items from the runway in real-time

However, high-end or mid-range Thai timepiece brands should not ignore the power of social media. Daniel Wellington sets a great example through owning its own social media game. The company reduced spending on traditional advertising and turned instead to social media to reach potential consumers through use of the hashtag #DanielWellington. This also leverages user-generated content (UGC) to engage its customers and drive brand loyalty.

An Instagram post was created with #DanielWellington as #DWPickoftheDay and #DWPickoftheMonth

By taking your brand digital, you are embracing an endless supply of consumer data. As Shadi Halliwell, the creative and marketing director of Harvey Nichols stated,

“Data is a conversation; the more data you have on someone, the more conversation you can have.”  

Chinese ecommerce platform JD is lesser known amongst international audiences, but its mid-annual 618 shopping festival generated almost $25 billion in gross merchandise value this past June. The company has a 33% share of China’s B2C ecommerce market and generates more direct revenues than Alibaba. Google’s latest $550 million strategic investment in the company is the latest in a series of partnerships JD has orchestrated, as it seeks to challenge Alibaba and Amazon for ecommerce dominance in both China and the rest of the world.

JD’s Direct Retailing Model Gives it a Strong Competitive Advantage

JD’s business model is distinct from that of Alibaba’s in that it is a direct retailer – meaning that it purchases inventory wholesale and sells products directly to individual customers, rather than simply acting as an intermediary between buyers and sellers. Approximately 92% of its business comes from direct sales, whereas for Amazon this figure hovers around 50%.

JD stocks its own inventory in its vast proprietary network of nearly 500 warehouses across China, each of which is situated strategically close to consumers to ensure fast delivery. JD also employs an in-house delivery force of over 65,000 warehousing and delivery workers. During the 618 festival this year, JD was able to deliver 90% of its goods within two days.

This dedication to customer service requires a significant amount of capital to sustain, but JD has been able to stand out from its competitors.

JD claws its way up to a 33% market share in an industry where Alibaba was previously thought to be unbeatable.

Richard Liu, CEO of JD.com delivering goods during their ‘618’ Mid Year Sales Source: Internet

The Borderless Retail Alliance

To compete with Alibaba, JD has enlisted the help of numerous partners. In China, this includes internet giants Tencent and Baidu, in addition to its partnerships with the likes of vertical-focused ecommerce platforms Vipshop and Meili Inc. Tencent owns 18% of JD’s shares and partnered with JD to invest $864 million in China’s third largest ecommerce platform Vipshop this past December. JD made its claim to fame by selling electronics to a predominantly male user base, and such partnerships with Vipshop and Meili, both of which sell a combination of apparel and cosmetics, help the company appeal to a broader female base.

America’s largest retailer Wal-Mart owns 10% of JD’s shares and has been a strategic partner since 2016 when it first sold its ecommerce division Yihaodian to JD Google, despite having a limited presence in the China market, announced a $550 million investment in JD this past June. Both of these strategic partnerships will be key as JD prepares to expand its business overseas.

Google’s Data Will Help JD Catch Up Overseas

Ecommerce platforms such as JD spend an enormous amount of money on search ads every year, to ensure that their products show up in search results. As they grow bigger, however, internet users can go directly to ecommerce platforms to search for products, which presents a threat to Baidu’s and Google’s search ads business. Partnering with JD allows Google to hedge against this problem.

Google’s extensive ecommerce data can give JD better insights into the buying behavior of users, and JD will have a better idea of how to target users via Google’s broad ads network. This will be a significant asset as it attempts to catch up with local competitors in Southeast Asia, Europe, and the US.

Wal-Mart and JD Make the Perfect Couple

US retail giant Wal-Mart has been partners with JD since 2016 when it sold its online business Yihaodian to JD in exchange for a 5% equity stake worth $1.5 billion. That stake has since grown to 10%. In China, Wal-Mart leverages JD’s marketplace and users to sell directly to Chinese consumers online, complementing its offline business in the country. For JD, Wal-Mart is a key supplier for the JD Daojia platform, which is an on-demand delivery service that delivers groceries to customers within a one-hour time frame.

JD also sells its goods offline in Wal-Mart stores and uses them as distribution centers from which last-mile delivery can be carried out. Since JD is an online retailer without many offline retail stores, the addition of Wal-Mart’s physical locations across China is a considerable asset as it looks to expand its user base via omnichannel marketing strategies. JD is planning to expand to the US market by the end of this year, and the potential expansion of this partnership model means that JD may have a chance to catch up with Amazon, especially since the two can leverage economies of scale and source goods in bulk.

JD Dao Jia partnered with Wal-Mart on sales promotion Source: Internet

JD Goes Global

With an impressive set of partnerships under its belt, JD has the capability to challenge Alibaba and, potentially Amazon, on the global stage. JD has already set up international ecommerce site Joybuy in Spain this year and is looking to expand to Germany. JD has also launched local websites in Thailand and Indonesia under the JD brand. JD has publicly announced its intention to enter the US market by the end of 2018, with a beachhead office located in Los Angeles. The company plans to undercut its competitors and also help Chinese brands like Xiaomi expand to the US.

While it is still early stages, what is certain is that JD’s global expansion will be very interesting to watch going forward.

Written by Don Zhao, Co-founder and Executive Director of Azoya 

 

It’s amazing how this highly upvoted answer (Ron Rule’s answer to What stops Walmart from beating Amazon in online shopping?) is basically proving, without the author realizing it, why Disruption Theory works. The answer takes an exceedingly narrow view of the entire retail industry and labels the pursuit of leadership in an emerging market/channel (ecommerce), which is clearly where the world is heading over the next few decades, as mere “bragging rights”.

“Disruptive innovations tend to be produced by outsiders and entrepreneurs, rather than existing market-leading companies. The business environment of market leaders does not allow them to pursue disruptive innovations when they first arise, because they are not profitable enough at first and because their development can take scarce resources away from sustaining innovations (which are needed to compete against current competition).”

(Source: Disruptive innovation – Wikipedia)

The real answer is, Amazon has already won in online shopping. It is not due to a lack of effort from competitors, which is probably too little too late.

ecommerceIQ

This quote, attributed to Jeff Bezos, sums up why:

Your margin is my opportunity.

Even with Walmart’s massive revenues and profits (compared to Amazon), it cannot compete with the juggernaut that is built by Bezos. Amazon is “not profitable” by choice. All the earnings are put back into the business, either into more capital investments or to sell loss-leading products that lock in customers or drive competitors out of business, vertical by vertical, and market by market.

The investments that Amazon has made over the first two and a half decades of its existence give it momentum such that it is tough if not impossible for any other company to catch up over the coming decades: the technology stack, the deeply integrated logistics/supply chain (they are now getting into competition with FedEx/UPS), the effective third-party seller marketplace, the customer loyalty (through Prime).

Every exponential curve runs below the linear curve in it’s infancy, that is until it suddenly crosses over, goes through the roof and hits the sky. Even though in absolute numbers Walmart is still bigger than Amazon, only one of the lines below is going up and to the right:

ecommerceIQ

On top of all this, in the last couple of years, Amazon is also getting into physical retail, with acquisition of Whole Foods and pilot of Amazon Go. Here’s a great analysis of this: Amazon’s New Customer (I highly recommend Stratechery for tech+strategy topics in general).

At this point it is more likely that Amazon will eventually beat Walmart at physical retail, than Walmart will beat Amazon at online shopping. If Walmart wants to survive till the end of this century and not go the way of Sears, Walmart must come up with a strategy that creates value in a digital, super-connected future where everyone is hooked on to the convenience and choice furnished by online shopping, but in a manner that converts their massive current investments in physical retail from liabilities to assets.

The last thing Walmart should do is to build an Amazon clone. As then, they are playing by Amazon’s rules. And nobody beats Amazon at their own game.

 

Read the original on Quora by Pararth Shah, Software Engineer at Google

In a not-so-shocking move last month, retail giant Target acquired a grocery delivery startup for more than half a billion dollars to better compete with Amazon in the US.

Given the latter’s influence on the state of retail over the last decade, there has been a wave of excitement and fear sweeping the industry on a global scale.

The gradual consumer preference for digital has forced traditional businesses, predominantly in developed markets, to restructure internally or shut down. Case examples include retail leaders Macy’s, Sears, and American Apparel, whose legacies are now read about in bankruptcy stories.

Today’s headlines are revealing retail behemoths getting pushed to a corner by a new breed of entrants shaking up the retail status quo with business models revolving around ecommerce, omni-channel, click and collect. These new companies also tend to execute faster, reach further and understand how to utilize the goldmine that is the internet.

But understanding that “digital disruption” or “retail innovation” is needed within a traditional corporation isn’t merely enough to bring about real change.

The speed at which businesses incorporate digital channels will determine their chances at survival and relevancy to the next generation of consumers.

But by the time they come around to asking, “am I moving fast enough to catch up to my competitors?”

It’s already too late.

Shopping sprees in the West

Companies in the US felt heat from the Amazon Effect much earlier than India or Southeast Asia did, ensuing panic in direct competitors like Walmart, Target and Home Depot and forcing them to act quickly.

In the last two years alone, large corporations like the above invested over $5 billion in acquiring digital companies to beef up their portfolios.

While most of these companies have the capacity to carve out resources to build their own ecommerce operations in house, the pace at which the internet industry moves doesn’t wait for employees to learn “Digital 101”.

Not to mention the additional pain points such as internal resistance, lack of ecommerce talent and channel conflicts. Large corporations in general tend to struggle when venturing outside of their core competencies. The quickest way to patch up your business is to buy what you don’t have.

In regards to Walmart’s total $4 billion acquisition spree,

“Walmart is buying a new consumer base — upper-middle-class people who normally wouldn’t shop at Walmart — and these new relationships would bring higher margins.” — Jim Cusson, president of retail branding agency Theory House

And the “buy what you don’t have” trend is prevalent across the industry as more traditional players gobble up digital startups. In the last eight months alone,

Walmart [retailer]: acquires Bonobos for $310 million in cash and last mile delivery startup Parcel
Sodexo [food management]: acquires majority stake in Paris-based online restaurant and food delivery startup FoodCheri
Home Depot [retailer]: acquires online business of retailer of textiles and home decor products The Company Store
FTD [flower delivery giant]: acquires on-demand flower startup BloomThat
Target [retailer]: acquires same-day delivery startup Shipt
Luxico [luxury home rentals]: acquires US-based text messaging platform for hotels Hello Scout
Albertsons [grocery retailer]: acquires meal kit company Plated
McKesson Canada [healthcare supply chain]: acquires marketplace for natural healthcare and beauty products Well.ca

“Quality exits like this don’t stem from a ‘for sale’ sign tacked to the door.” – Chris Arsenault, board member at Well.ca

Of course, the enormous price tags of these acquisitions could be spent on buffing up the in-store experience but the returns would take a long time to see whereas Target’s own online sales growth from Q1 2015 to Q3 2017 show how successful the company has been able to leverage ecommerce.

Target ecommerce growth from 2015 to 2017. Source: Bloomberg

While an acquisition may seem like a quick, easy solution, there are numerous factors to consider to avoid backlash such as price point adjustments and consistent branding. Without understanding how digital can compliment the current business model, it’s likely the new asset will simmer and die in a couple of years. Simply put, don’t buy ecommerce for ecommerce sake.

Absorbing a digital company on the other hand brings about mountains of data, new customers, a solid brand, fresh talent and a seat at the hippest place where everyone hangs out, the internet.

Movement in the ASEAN region

As with most trends, they eventually infiltrate markets on a global scale and Southeast Asia is no exception. Even a couple of years before Amazon’s lackluster entry in Singapore, a few traditional retailers took the acquisition route to capture digital opportunity early.

Sephora bought online beauty retailer Luxola in 2015, Central Group acquired fashion e-tailer Zalora Thailand in 2016 and last year announced a joint venture with Chinese internet giant JD.com.

What has driven this flurry of activity by corporations across the world?

It is avoiding what Jeff Bezos describes as “Day 2”. An idea explained nicely by Bezos in his letter to stakeholders:

“Day 2 is stasis. Followed by irrelevance. Followed by excruciating, painful decline. Followed by death. And that is why it is always Day 1. To be sure, this kind of decline would happen in extreme slow motion. An established company might harvest Day 2 for decades, but the final result would still come.” – Jeff Bezos

Which day does your company operate in?

As the year’s largest online sales campaigns wrap up, research from Google and Temasek predict Southeast Asia is well on its way towards becoming a digital powerhouse worth much more than $200 billion USD in eight short years. How did shoppers behave during Single’s Day in light of all the work poured into gaining their trust and promoting online shopping?

From exclusive updates provided by the companies to ecommerceIQ, here is how Google’s recent report correlates with real time results.

Lazada Group Single’s Day and Online Revolution:

  • Single’s Day (11.11) generated USD$123 million gross merchandise value (GMV), 171% year-on-year growth
  • Shoppers ordered 6.5 million items, 191% year-on-year growth
  • 70% of orders were placed from mobile devices
  • Sells 12 limited edition Volkswagen Beetles within 20 minutes, each costing RM112,112 (USD$27,441) during Lazada Malaysia Online Revolution (12.12)
  • Apple products offered officially on Lazada as the brand’s authorised online reseller, opens shop-in-shop (SiS)

11street Malaysia 

  • 600% increase in cross-border product orders, 400% increase in total orders (compared to a regular day)
  • Most popular products: GPS, mobile accessories, smartphones, TV sets, theme park tickets
  • Traffic to the website doubled, 85% contributed by mobile

Shopee 9.9 Mobile Shopping Day 

  • 350% increase in orders, 500% increase in traffic
  • Most popular products: make up brushes, smart watches, canvas backpacks
  • 7 million chats, 30,000 participating sellers
  • Highest number of items ordered by one buyer was 218
  • Find more here

The results from this year’s mega sales campaigns work well with new predictions by Google & Temasek in their latest e-Conomy SEA Spotlight report:

  • Ecommerce sales of first-hand goods will reach $10.9 billion in GMV in 2017, up from $5.5 billion in 2015 (driven by top players like Lazada, Shopee, and Tokopedia)
  • Southeast Asia’s internet economy will reach $50 billion in 2017, growing at 27% CAGR
  • The region’s internet economy accounts for 2% of Southeast Asia’s GDP, will increase to 6% by 2025
  • There will be 330 million monthly active internet users by year end, 90% of which are smartphone users
  • Search interest for ecommerce brands growing more than two-fold in two years thanks to promotional activities and marketing investments by leading regional/global ecommerce players and co-marketing initiatives with top brands in electronics, fashion and consumer goods industries.

ecommerceIQ

It’s shaping up to be a good end to 2017 for ecommerce players, investors and shoppers in Southeast Asia. Stay tuned for 2018 ecommerce predictions.

For more charts & graphs related to ecommerce in Southeast Asia, check out our database.

Events

InternetRetailing Expo Indonesia 2018 is your opportunity to transform your retailing business. Taking your business ‘online’ promises increased sales, international customers and a more engaged, loyal customer base.

If you are looking to progress from offline to fully-fledged online retailer, then you need to learn the lessons from retailers across ASEAN that have tried, failed and succeeded in a wealth of aspects of online retail.