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Cosmetics and healthcare manufacturer from China, Longrich Bioscience, is eyeing the ecommerce market in Indonesia as reported by Bisnis.com. The company feels optimistic about its venture in the country as it sets a monthly target of $300,000 sales per month by 2017 and $1 million of sales per month in the next five years.

Longrich International President, Charlie Chin said that the company is confident with its target as the economy in Indonesia is getting stronger and people’s purchasing power in the country will continue to increase.

The company is not alone in their opinion, back in June, Chinese investors have also expressed their confidence in Indonesia’s future business outlook.

Longrich eyes markets beyond Java

Longrich has been operating in Indonesia since 2013 and has seen a positive growth in the last 1.5 years. General Manager of Longrich Indonesia, Thamrin Slamet claimed that the sales growth has reached 120%.

In addition to producing its own line of products, the manufacturer also serves other brands such as GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) who owns the toothpaste brand Sensodyne.

Indonesian big cities like Jakarta and Surabaya are the main markets for Longrich’s variety of products but the company will not only focus on Java, Indonesia’s most populous island. It has a business center in Medan, North Sumatera. It also serves the people in Palembang and big cities in eastern Indonesia.

Globally, Longrich is present in 15 countries and recorded $167 million in revenue globally in 2015.

A version of this appeared in Bisnis.com on August 14. Read the full article in Bahasa here.

Indonesia policy reform

Source: Google images

The World Bank praised Indonesia’s recent reforms, including higher public infrastructure spending and deregulation measures to lessen strict trade and investment policies, for maintaining the country’s resilience and allowing the government to diversify economically.

Since September 2015, the government’s has announced numerous policy reforms. Some sectors — in particular, trade and investment policy — witnessing a shift towards deregulation and have helped to maintain investor confidence in the country, hence Indonesia’s resilience against limited investment due to slowing global demand and volatility in the global financial market.

Moving to Manufacturing

Rodrigo Chaves, the World Bank’s Country Director for Indonesia, said global economic headwinds, including the consistently low commodity prices and the sluggish global trade, have forced Indonesia — a commodity exporter country — to expand into sectors other than mining and commodity, such as the manufacturing and service sectors.

Indonesia’s manufacturing operations are dominated by assembling and blending, which makes the country vulnerable to changes in multinational corporations’ global strategies. The country’s global share of manufacturing has remained at around 0.6 percent over the last 15 years.

“This is the right time to improve Indonesia’s manufacturing sector,” said Ndiame Diop, the World Bank’s Lead Economist for Indonesia. “Now is a critical moment for Indonesia to implement further reforms that will enhance the competitiveness of its manufacturing and services sectors, especially tourism.”

The World Bank kept its March prediction that the Indonesian economy will grow 5.1 percent this year.

Earlier this month, the Bank downgraded its global growth forecast to 2.4 percent from the previous 2.9 percent. Private consumption and public capital spending are projected to support Indonesia’s growth this year.

“Indonesia’s policy reform is the foundation of our economic resilience. I can’t stress this enough,” said Trade Minister Thomas Lembong.

A version of this appeared in Jakarta Globe on June 20. Read the full article here.