Posts

Wind down from a busy Friday by catching up with the key ecommerce headlines here.

1. Indonesia’s HaloDoc Raises $13 million in Series A, from Singaporean private equity firm Clermont and NSI Ventures

The app is available for Android and iOS and offers a full range of services: online consultation, medicine delivery, on-demand lab tests, a hospital and doctor directory, as well as an appointment scheduler. There’s no web version of it, just the app. Read the rest of the story here.

 

2. New Amazon data from Wall Street should terrify all retail stores in the US

 According to a note published on Thursday by financial firm PiperJaffray, Amazon now has a warehouse or delivery station within 20 miles of 44% of the US population. Read the rest of the story here.

 

3. Rocket Internet’s Home24’s valuation fall sparks concerns of downgrades in other Rocket firms

The volatile shares of Rocket Internet dropped on Thursday after the German e-commerce investor slashed the valuation of its Home24 online furniture business by more than half in a funding round. Read the rest of the story here.

 

4. Maybank partners with Samsung Pay to strengthen presence across Singapore

The launch of Samsung Pay in Singapore follows the bank’s introduction of its mobile wallet in Malaysia last month, and will be followed by the progressive roll‐out of other digital initiatives across the region. Read the rest of the story here.

 

5. Alipay takes part in $460 million stake in Yum China, To Implement Alipay in KFC and Pizza Hut

This collaboration will see Yum China move into a new chapter of world class mobile payment services for tens of millions of customers across its brands. Read the rest of the story here.

SuperAwesome Ecommerce Study

The latest finding of SuperAwesome children’s ecommerce study has revealed that despite the sharp rise of ecommerce activity in the region, Southeast Asian children don’t spend much online. According to the ‘kids safe’ digital marketing platform, Southeast Asian kids are also far more likely to spend money on snacks or confectionary than books compared to children in the West.

64% of 6­-14 year old’s in the region claim never to make purchases online or spend their pocket money on digital products.

In the study of 1,800 kids in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam by kids platform SuperAwesome, on average 65% of 6­14 year old’s claim to spend their pocket money on drinks and snacks, and only 44% spend on toys and less than 15% on computer games.

Contrast to British kids of the same age, who favor spending their pocket money on games (63%), clothes (45%) and eating out (33%).

SuperAwesome Ecommerce Study

Kids in Southeast Asia like to snacks more than buying toys.

Brand awareness of snacks and meal brands such as KFC and McDonald’s in Southeast Asia is far higher (75%) than of global toy brands (35%) such as My Little Pony and Hot Wheels. Singapore and Malaysia are the exceptions, as the kids there are familiar with toy brands such as Lego.

Vietnam stands out as a market where books are a popular item for kids to spend pocket money on, Thailand for eating out and Indonesia for drinks, snacks and confectionery. Quan Nguyen, director of SuperAwesome, said this is because FMCG companies were much earlier to enter ASEAN markets and toy brands have been sold through local distributors and have far smaller marketing budgets.

Thailand is the only country where kids do spend money on apps.

Digital activity is low among youngsters in the region because you don’t need to go online to buy snacks and online spending, particularly for kids under the age of 13, starts with parents, however this may change with apps like PokemonGo. The trust of online transactions remains relatively low and cash is still the preferred payment method in fear of fraud. Plus, many shops load free apps for customers on to your phone without the need for an account or a credit card.

Click to see the full Children’s Ecommerce infographic.

 

A version of this appeared in Mumbrella Asia on August 9. Read the full article here.