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Here’s what you need to know.

1. PromptPay is becoming more popular in Thailand

Transactions via PromptPay stood at around 15,000 a day on average last week, Bank of Thailand governor Veerathai Santiprabhob said at yesterday’s Post Today forum. “From what we have monitored, the PromptPay problems were caused by human error, not the system.”

“Even though the volume transactions keeps increasing, it only accounts for a very small portion of traffic the system can handle,” he said. Given that PromptPay’s backdoor system is scalable, the system can be upgraded to cope with a higher number of transactions in the future.”

Read the rest of the story here.

 

2. Gartner: Don’t expect uplift in delivery drones for years

The firm is expecting delivery drones to make up less than one per cent of the commercial drone market by 2020, asserting that it does not expect them to be “a major factor for several years”.

The firm expects that delivery drones will begin finding a niche in business to business applications first, particularly for internal services within one company where logistics will not be such a big factor.

Read the rest of the story here.

 

3.  Recommended Reading: Hermès Sales Gain Adds Evidence of Luxury Recovery in China

Chinese shoppers are shopping again.

Hermes International SCA added to evidence of a luxury rebound as shoppers in Asia buy more silk scarves and Birkin handbags.

At Hermes, revenue growth in Asia-Pacific, excluding Japan, slowed to 4% from 14.2% the previous quarter. The slowdown is due to lower inventories in leather goods after the company ramped up output and sales with new production sites earlier last year.

Read the rest of the story here.

In the world of luxury clothing brands, there are two that stand out: Burberry and Hermès. Both brands enjoy a longstanding history within the fashion world, but they differ greatly in ecommerce offerings, according to econsultancy.

Burberry is a brand that gets it right. The brand offers a digital experience that perfectly aligns with its design; creating a sleek and modern feel to the website. The bold visuals are integrated with interactive elements that easily captures the attention of an online browser. Here’s what Burberry did right and how Hermès can improve:

1. Compelling visual design

Burberry succeeds at creating innovative product pages that sets it apart from competitors. Product images are shot on a consistent backdrop, with elements of the products in clear view. This function makes it possible to see small details without zooming in.

ecommerce lessons from Burberry and Hermes

Burberry offers detailed product info without the clutter. Source: econsultancy

One unique feature that Burberry manages to utilize is the use of larger image tiles, which elevates the visual experience. supplementary product details are sectioned off so consumers can quickly find the information they are looking for.

Burberry also reduces the footprint of any product recommendation display and aligns it off center to not distract from the main product while still offering the option.

2. Consistent brand experience offline and online

Burberry manages to provide consumers with a platform that tells an engaging, interactive story about the brand. They infuse content and commerce to create an online experience similar to visiting a physical store.

ecommerce lessons from Burberry and Hermès

The ‘acoustic’ section adds an element of personalization and offers an engaging visual story. Source: econsultancy

The website has an ‘acoustic’ section where up and coming musicians perform in natural environments while dressed in Burberry clothing, without any feelings of ‘hard sell’.

3. Easy-to-navigate website 

Brands often feature an extensive product line-up, so categorizing each product can be challenging. This can make it difficult for consumers to navigate through the website without a good UX design.

Burberry succeeds at providing online shoppers with a simplified site. The search bar on the left hand side of the site is very easy to navigate and organizes products by category/collection.

Hermès, however, provides a slightly different online experience.

ecommerce lessons from Burberry and Hermes

The homepage instantly calls for a divide between store and commerce experience. Source: econsultancy

Hermès makes a stark divide between online and offline, forcing shoppers to pick instead of allowing them to soak in the entire brand experience.

4. Creativity is balanced with functionality

Hermès is a brand that goes far in differentiating their sites from competition, but it ends up being confusing. The homepage looks more like an art gallery than a brand store, with its hand drawn images and lack of product description.

ecommerce lessons from Burberry and Hermes

The product page lacks commerce functions. Source: econsultancy

5. Robust product pages

There is a lack of information in Hermès’ product pages. Product descriptions consist of a few words such as ” Printed Beach Towel”. Images are presented on sketches and not on models, which doesn’t translate well for commerce.

It could be said that this approach may resonate with the Hermès’ loyal customers, but will fail to engage the brand with new customers in an increasingly competitive digital commerce landscape. However, another way to look at this is to recognize that Hermès is an exclusive high-end luxury brand that promotes the ‘waiting list’ culture or in-store browsing experience. The brand expects its customers to understand its vision, which is why it fails to adopt traditional ‘boring’ product pages or craft an interactive story on the homepage.

A version of this appeared in econsultancy on July 6. Read the full version here.