Posts

Uber seems to be doing well after its abrupt exit from the competitive Southeast Asia market after selling to local competitor Grab. The ride-hailing company made $2.5 billion in profit on $2.6 billion revenue in Q1 2018.

“Uber gained $2.9 billion after it merged its businesses in Russia and Southeast Asia with local competitors.” – Recode

How has Grab spent this time and opportunistic time to grow market share?

Well, the Singaporean based, ride-hailing Grab celebrates its sixth birthday this year and its founder and CEO Anthony Tan recently took the occasion to announce the launch of its new investment arm: Grab Innovate.

This is a good sign pointing to healthy coffers and without Uber, the company has a relatively a smooth path to a ride-hail/all-in-one super app monopoly in Southeast Asia markets (that are not Indonesia).

A lot has changed since Uber’s exit two months ago.

Grab’s Timeline Following Uber’s Exit

March 25th – Uber exits from Southeast Asia, sells to Grab
May 7th – Grab rolls back discounts for customers and incentives for drivers
May 7th – Grab Singapore launches three new services: GrabAssist, GrabCar Plus and GrabFamily
May 7th – Grab allows cash top up feature in the Philippines
May 17th – Motorbike taxi drivers protest in front of Grab Bike office in Bangkok
May 28th – Grab launches GrabFood in Singapore
June 4th – Grab announces launch of Grab&Go allowing riders to try up to four free samples such as cereal bars, shampoo, etc. during their rides
June 5th – Grab announces launch of Grab Ventures and Velocity

But there has been backlash from various communities – rider and drivers alike – who are disappointed with the company’s recent performance, user experience after only now being forced to use the Grab app.

What are customers unhappy about?

Based on an ecommerceIQ Community survey, the top two ride-hailing providers preferred by customers remain Grab and Uber.

ecommerceIQ

It is also important to keep in mind the top respondents reside in Singapore, Indonesia and Thailand that can skew the results as LINE and Go-Jek aren’t available in Singapore.

When asked about the other value-added services used in addition to ride-hailing, customers chose “Food delivery” and “Package delivery” in second and third place, respectively. Results also revealed the adoption of built-in e-wallets aren’t popular.

ecommerceIQ

And all hell broke loose when customers were asked to ‘speak their mind’ about Grab services in Southeast Asia. These were a few of the replies:

“Functionality not as good as Uber, but improving. Maps not as accurate, main gripe is timings – the estimated times are totally off so really hard to know when to book. Wallet has been useful at hawkers / festivals a couple of times, would use more if that expands.”

“Cannot change the pickup location (sometimes GPS is not accurate) – tried ordering food at 11AM and it said rider not available – got a lot more expensive and waiting got much worse after Uber’s exit.”

Prices has increased dramatically since the merger with Uber; what’s worse is, driver availability has also gone down since.”

Too expensive now. Confusing fare structure and flat rate charged before the trip are more expensive than taking a taxi. Losing UberEATS for GrabFood is the bigger disappointment though – at least Grab’s transport works, the GrabFood UX/UI is the worst app I’ve opened for four years and completely unfriendly to non Thais.”

And a single positive reply:

“Awesome.”

Most common complaints? Terrible UX, inaccurate Maps, lack of drivers and more expensive than before.

Go-Jek to the rescue?

Not quite.

While on-demand in Indonesia is essentially untouchable due to Go-Jek’s market dominance and customer loyalty, the company will struggle to convince other Southeast Asians to download yet another on-demand app when they expand.

But a window of opportunity may be wide open for them if Grab doesn’t improve its user experience (and quickly given Go-Jek’s long-awaited expansion).

ecommerceIQ

Source: GrabFood Apple Store reviews

During our intimate interviews with Jakartians who surprisingly use multiple digital payments, we discovered it is all due to convenience. Because they already use Go-Jek to order everything else on one platform – one app. They don’t want to install more applications on their mobile phones.

Let’s say Go-Jek is able to overcome tricky government regulations, assemble driver fleets, and jump through talent pool hoops, customers trying Go-Jek, already well-known in Indonesia for its superior UX/UI, have access to the company’s all-in-one app services – all in one.

This is an already added plus considering users need to download a separate GrabFood app to order food versus the built in function in Go-Jek’s app.

GoJek’s expansion will also mean users can enjoy lower prices as companies will likely revert back to heavy subsidies to win customers and leading to Grab dropping prices once again.

ecommerceIQ, Consumer Pulse

Source: ecommerceIQ Ride Hailing Survey 2018

Competition is a good thing

Competition encourages businesses to improve the quality of goods and services they sell to attract more customers and expand market share.

“Preparations are well under way and within the next few weeks our first new country launch will be announced. This will be followed by three other countries in Southeast Asia by the middle of the year.” – Nadiem Makarim, CEO and founder of Go-Jek.

Citing the financial and strategic backing of its local and global partners, he added: “We are confident that we have more than enough support to take one of the most amazing growth stories in the world from being an Indonesian phenomenon to a global one.”

Grab should be taking advantage of this brief moment of competitor-less time to become even more user friendly, push revenue limits and popularise its e-wallet, but based on survey results, forgotten to optimise its core value proposition – a seamless ride-hailing experience.

Brace yourselves everyone, we’re in for another on-demand showdown.

Over the last few days, major moves have been made by a handful of top ecommerce players in Southeast Asia in efforts to cement a position in payments. Each company is already well aware: if you want people to buy or use your services, it makes sense to have direct influence over their spending.

Owning the payments chain has become so important (thanks to what was witnessed in China), that Amazon announced it would pass discounts to retailers if they used its online payment service.

Earlier this week, ShopBack, a cash back ecommerce aggregator, acquired Singaporean personal finance startup for an undisclosed amount. The stated reason being it wanted to help millennials ‘better handle their money‘, but with a new team of developers, no doubt the company is looking to optimise its existing system.

What was more interesting this past week were the new discoveries made by Go-Jek and Grab users in Southeast Asian markets.

Go-Pay

The on-demand market leader in Indonesia has expanded its reach to the most unexpected locations – street food vendors.

Tweet translation: “Interesting find this afternoon: Some street vendors on the alley beside Bank BNI Kebon Sirih have accepted payment with Go-Pay. When I bought ayam penyet [fried chicken] at my regular place, I just have to scan a QR code, show the payment slip, and that’s it. So cool!”

ecommerceIQ

The popularity of Go-Jek in Indonesia is almost legendary and this example shows how far its reach goes. The difficulty for Go-Jek will be expansion outside of Indonesia to other markets in the region, where similar on-demand companies exist.

GrabPay

With Uber officially out of the picture, Grab is doubling efforts to increase the adoption of its e-wallet, GrabPay. On a trip to Manila May 7th, an ecommerceIQ Community member shared with us app screenshots of Grab promoting a new cash ‘top up’ feature. Riders can add money to their Grab accounts by simply handing their drivers cash.

This is hardly innovative as Go-Jek has offered cash top ups since 2016, a large contributing factor to its success in Indonesia, but it shows Grab’s seriousness in evolving its payments product to the local market.

 

ecommerceIQ

 

This new feature follows Grab’s launch of three other services the company introduced to the Singapore market: GrabAssist, GrabCar Plus, and GrabFamily.

“Grab’s vision is to be an everyday app for consumers,” said Tarin Thaniyavarn, country head of Grab Thailand.

Regulations stand in the way of Grab’s vision in Southeast Asia as most countries lack any solid regulations to ride-hailing companies. Currently, the company is unsuccessfully trying to acquire a microfinance licence from the Bank of Thailand.

What drives the adoption of new technology?

Grab is targeting hawker stalls in Singapore, Go-Jek has already successfully penetrated local vendors in Jakarta. Grab is offering cash top ups, Go-Jek has been doing so for the past two years. They both offer on-demand services, taxis, cars, bikes and the technology and mechanics of an e-wallet are not all that different player to player. They are essentially going toe to toe, what is going to push further adoption?

The real winner will be the company’s capability in effectively communicating the benefits of its payments service to users. How aware are users of its existence and its importance? How can it make their lives easier versus using good old fashioned cash or swiping a credit card?

In developed markets like the US, Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Google Wallet have single digit adoption rates compared to credit card usage. Why? Because the country already fares well with credit cards, there is no reason to change habits.

The same case can be made for relatively cash-less markets like Singapore. The real opportunity to dominate payments is in developing markets like Indonesia and Thailand, where credit card ownership floats around only 4 percent and majority of the population owns a smartphone.

ecommerceIQ

 

“To enhance awareness, you really need advertising — one thing that’s not well understood [by consumers] about Samsung Pay is that it has more utility the Apple Pay; you can use it at a non-NFC terminal and that’s a huge advantage I don’t think Samsung is doing a good job of promoting.”

Here’s what you should know today.

1.Amazon is tightening its grip to India’s mobile shoppers

US-based ecommerce giant Amazon is almost neck-to-neck with Flipkart in winning India’s mobile ecommerce users, according to the latest data by 7Park.

Amazon captured 30.3% of the country’s mobile shoppers, just slightly lower from Flipkart’s 30.7%. Meanwhile, Snapdeal lagged behind at 10.8%.

At a closer look, Amazon’s growth has been at the expense of Flipkart. From Q1 2016 to Q1 2017, the company saw a spike of 46%. Flipkart’s app engagement in the meantime has declined 11.5% during the same period.

Mobile plays an important in India’s ecommerce market, especially since 80% of traffic to both Flipkart and Snapdeal came from their respective apps or mobile sites.

Amazon also had 10 times more browsers turning into buyers than Flipkart did. Amazon’s unique purchasers reportedly grew 113.1%, far above Flipkart at 10.8%.

Read the rest of the story here.

2. Gojek is raising $1 billion of funding for Southeast Asia expansion

Gojek is looking to raise a $1 billion worth of funding, cited anonymous sources close to process as first reported by Wall Street Journal.

The ride-hailing app is looking to raise capital at a $2 billion pre-money valuation.

The fund is said to be used for their regional expansion plan to Southeast Asia countries such as the Philippines, Thailand, Myanmar, and Vietnam.

In August 2016, Gojek has raised $550 million from various investors including KKR, Warburg Pincus, Farallon Capital, and Capital Group Private Markets.

The company has branching out to fintech by building and promoting their own e-wallet service with much success. Gojek’s direct competitor, Grab has recently following their footsteps by acquiring Indonesian O2O ecommerce platform, Kudo.

Read the rest of the story here.

3. Recommended Reading: Luxury brands are going more and more digital

According to the fifth edition of Contactlab and Exane BNP Paribas’ ‘Digital Competitive Map’, luxury brands’ digital performance was up +5% overall.

The research, which encompasses a range of evaluation parameters, has included social media reach for the first time this year.

Burberry claimed the throne out of the 32 international luxury brands for two consecutive years now. Among the top five are also Louis Vuitton, Tory Burch, Gucci, and Fendi.

“Catering to millennial consumers is especially crucial in order to improve digital sales (…) The beauty of social media platforms, such as Instagram, is that they allow customers and brands to communicate globally, catalyse organic engagement, form creative communities and drive sales.” commented Contactlab’s Senior Advisor, Marco Pozzi.

Read the rest of the story here.