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The Background  

In Japan, there is a renowned chain of stores with an iconic penguin-mascot that is a must-see for tourists, serving almost 300 million customers a year. The famous merchandise stores started with humble beginnings offering a collection of discarded goods and samples from companies on the verge of bankruptcy in 1978.

With insufficient resources to hire workers, founder Takao Yasuda spent long nights restocking shelves and took note of the high number of late night shoppers who mistakenly came into his shop thinking it was still open.

Yasuda opened the first 24-hour store Don Quijote (also known as Donki) in 1989. Don Quijote, pronounced ‘dawn kee-ho-tay’, operates with the rare concept of a compressed display in which items are displayed in clusters, causing aisles to feel like mazes.

Browsers can find anything under the sun, from toilet paper, snacks, sex toys to luxury cosmetic brands and pre-loved Rolex watches.

The point of the display is hard to find, hard to take and hard to buy,” — Takao Yasuda, founder of Don Quijote Co.

Mr. Takao Yasuda, standing in front of handwritten cardboard signs and stacked displays in one of his Don Quijote stores. Source: Reuters

Strange to think that any shop owner would want their items to be hard to find but Yasuda’s compressed display is actually a brilliant strategy that led the business to grow to 350 stores in Japan and the US, with annual consolidated sales topping $7.4 billion in Japan.

Shoppers seemed to have taken to the treasure-hunt mentality making the stores a popular destination for tourists visiting Japan.

Japanese retail is built on the concept of saving time. We want our customers to spend more time at our stores,” — says Yasuda

By adopting a unique retail strategy to become a consumer magnet, what could possibly go wrong with Japan’s largest discount store?

The Challenge

Japan has always been among the world’s most loved destinations for travel and culinary experiences but in 2014, the country fell to 22nd as the most-visited destinations. Due to language barriers, foreign tourists contributed to only 3.5% of revenues, generated in major cities like Tokyo and Osaka.


Being a business that relies heavily on revenue generated by tourists who spend on average more than 40,000 yen ($365) each visit, compared with local shoppers’ 2,400 yen, Don Quijote recognized the need to spur the country’s dwindling tourism or be less dependent on it.

But around this time, the Japanese government increased consumption tax from 5% to 8%, sending Japan’s economy into freefall at an annual pace of 6.8% from April to June in 2014.

Despite the decrease of household spending at a worse-than-expected rate of 4.7%, Don Quijote’s sales rose 2.3%.  

But Yasuda knew it wasn’t enough, the company needed to find another stable revenue stream.

The Strategy

The important thing is to create a framework that attracts visitors to Japan, and that requires cooperation that goes beyond one company or industry,” — Yasuda told Reuters

Don Quijote’s strategy to pack its stores with more shoppers was incentives for more spending. The company signed deals with countless hotels and travel agencies to distribute membership cards that offered 3% cash back at Don Quijote.

The largest discount store in Japan was also reportedly behind the Japanese government’s decision to exempt tax for visitors. Starting Oct 1, all Don Quijote stores allow non-residents to shop tax-free nationwide and even pack the goods to follow airline guidelines.  

With emerging technologies and advancements in digital marketing and logistics, it seemed there was no better time to launch ecommerce.

Don Qujote’s online shopping website.

Don Quijote’s online shopping website positioned itself as the number one source for authentic, popular products from Japan straight to your home.

“When it comes to capturing inbound visitors, Don Quijote is unrivaled,” said Ryota Himeno, retail analyst at Barclays.

Although no official sales records from Don Quijote’s ecommerce site were found, an analysis at Barrons predicted that Don Quijote’s “store is immune [to the arrival of Amazon] because its price points are below the minimum break-even points for most ecommerce sites.” 

But its success, whether from online or offline stores, boils down to Don Quijote’s strong marketing tactics. Not only did the company specifically chose prime tourist locations across Japan to open its stores, the discount chain has adopted its own mascot.

The blue penguin donning a red cap is paired with its very own theme song called “Miracle Shopping” that plays on repeat in stores, bringing the Don Quijote stores to life.

Don Quijote has become woven into people’s lifestyles. For them, spending time at one of our stores has become part of their lives.”

The Japanese brand’s ability to attract flocks of young people and tourists to its stores has gained the attention of other notable retailers such as FamilyMart Uny that will transfer a 40 percent equity sake in wholly owned subsidiary Uny Co., a general merchandiser from Inazawa, Aichi Prefecture, to Don Quijote.

The Future

In addition to turning some of FamilyMart Uny’s stores into Don Quijotes, the pair are in talks about developing a service similar to Alibaba’s Alipay, which currently over 4,000 Japanese vendors are accepting, including both Don Quijote and FamilyMart.

Earlier this year, the company announced its goal to reach operating profits of $537 million by 2020 – 20% higher than the current target.

In order to achieve this, the company also opened its first store in Southeast Asia in Singapore, a country-state Yasuda actually relocated to for retirement. Why did he choose Singapore as HQ for the region?

Singapore is a very important market for us. It is also a good base for us as people speak English here and it makes it easier for us to expand globally.”

Singaporeans queueing outside Don Quijote (debuted as ‘Don Don Donki’ in Singapore) before it was officially opened on December 1. Source: Straits Times

The 1,397 sqm double-storey building is also offering in partnership with Hokkaido Marche, a themed retail and dining experience. There are also plans to launch at least 10 more stores by 2022.

This is exactly what Yasuda wants – having customers staying in the stores longer.

Yasuda looks to capture the hearts of Thais next, where about 901,400 of Thais visit Japan every year, ranked as the 6th highest foreign visitors to Japan. In fact, Thais were among the top overseas customers of ‘Donki’, after the Koreans, Chinese and Taiwanese.

If Yasuda gets his way, there will be a piece of Japan everywhere in the world.

 

Here’s what you need to know today.

1. Facebook beats in Q1 with $8.03B revenue

Facebook had another strong quarter, beating estimates to start 2017. It scored $8.03 billion in revenue and $1.04 GAAP actual EPS in Q1 compared to $0.87 EPS estimate.

It earned that from 1.94 billion users, up from 1.86 billion last quarter, growing at a faster 4.3 percent compared to 3.91 perecent last quarter.

While fake news, video violence, and copying Snapchat have all been fixtures of the Facebook news cycle, its user growth actually grew during the time period.

Facebook added 3 million monthly users in the lucrative but saturated US & Canada market, though the Asia-Pacific region was the big driver, where Facebook added 43 million users.

Facebook’s focus on the developing world with apps like the 200 million-user Facebook Lite, recently rolled-out Messenger Lite, and new Instagram offline mode are paying off.

Read the rest of the story here.

 

2. Korean beauty brand Memebox will no longer ship directly to US customers

The retailer revealed it will change its model from selling beauty products to focusing on educating consumers about Korean products through information, reviews and tutorials.

Though it will continue selling K-beauty products to Korea and China, the site will send its US customers to Amazon to shop. According to Memebox founder Dino Ha, the restructuring will turn Memebox into an educational site and search function rather than online shop

With the new model, Memebox will earn money through affiliate links rather than direct sales.

It currently has an affiliate agreement with Amazon, and Ha says the brand is in talks to create a similar deal with Sephora.Memebox still maintains its four private beauty labels, and will soon introduce a fifth, but the site will send US shoppers to Amazon to purchase the products.

Read the rest of the story here.

 

3. Recommended Reading: The next battleground for Amazon and Wal-Mart: the unbanked

 According to the FDIC, some 9 million households, or 7% of all U.S. households, do not have an account at an insured institution. Moreover, almost 20% of households, or 24.5 million households in the country, are “underbanked” — they have a checking or savings account, but also used other non-bank services for their banking needs.

Today, Wal-Mart helps the unbanked by offering an entire suite of financial services, which, in addition to the services mentioned earlier, also lets customers cash payroll and government checks, get prepaid debit cards, and print personal and business checks.

Amazon Cash isn’t yet so grandiose as a Wal-Mart Money Center, but it is specifically targeted to the unbanked consumer and may provide a platform for future expansion.

CVS, Speedway, Sheetz, and others and simply present a barcode from Amazon that they’ve either printed out or downloaded to a smartphone.

This is big because these are customers that have arguably been ignored previously by the e-tailer.

Read the rest of the story here.