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ecommerceIQ, together with Sasin SEC, created the Leadership Ecommerce Accelerator Program (LEAP) to provide the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to successfully run an ecommerce business in the world’s fastest-growing market.

While buying search keywords and having attractive content are almost crucial for modern-day marketing, quite often companies ignore an equally important aspect of content marketing/communications – Public Relations.

During this week’s class, lecturers unveiled effective ways to increase brand awareness using the media with ‘smart’ communications and how to achieve positive unit economics.

1. Treat media relations like dating

CYNTHIA LUO, ACOMMERCE HEAD OF COMMUNICATIONS AND ECOMMERCEIQ PRODUCT MANAGER

Not all companies can afford to have a communications team but this doesn’t mean they should neglect  “free publicity”. According to Cynthia,

“You, the executives, are the walking-talking mascots of the brand. If I run a Google search for your name, what does the audience learn about you?”

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Cynthia Luo, aCommerce Head of Communications and ecommerceIQ Product Manager

To make things easier, she compared the procedure of creating a relationship with a media to dating and baseball games.

  • Home Base: Similar to dating, you want to get to know the person that will be eventually writing about you. With journalists, introduce yourself by reaching out on Twitter or email, something as simple as complimenting their work. Twitter remains a popular social media platform among journalists.
  • First Base: Establish meaningful conversation. It can be done by finding out what the journalist is interested in, tweet interesting articles to them and ask for their opinions.
  • Second Base: Getting “physical”. With journalists, initiate a meet up, this can include a media visit to your office and/or a press event. This is also where a press release with newsworthy news should be shared.

Below are some headlines that typically make news:

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  • Third Base: In romantic relationships, it can be healthy to be exclusive. When your news is published, make sure you don’t damage the relationship with the media you created.

Common mistakes that would irritate journalists include spamming their inbox, using an unnecessary amount of buzzwords, and a delayed response to requests for comments.

2. Positive unit economics is the only way to be profitable

MICHAEL CLUZEL, EATIGO CO-FOUNDER AND CEO

As a marketer, economist and founder of the popular dining application, eatigo, Michael doesn’t believe in businesses that don’t profit.

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Michael Cluzel, eatigo co-founder and CEO

It’s common for a startup to depend on investors for financial injections but a startup should eventually be able to survive on their own if they choose to ‘break free from the aquarium’.

“Startups need to be independent from investors. Instead of relying on external financial sources, create your own source of income and be profitable.”

How? Ensure that Lifetime Value (LTV) is higher than Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) is reduced.

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3. Student case studies

SHEJI HO, ACOMMERCE GROUP CMO

The insurance sector in Thailand is the second largest in the Asean Economic Community, and accounted for 5.5% of GDP in 2016. However, direct premiums purchased through online channels have a YoY growth of 25% in 2016.

The students wanted to know how could they launch financial services online successfully and  what kind of marketing tools could be best leveraged?

According to Sheji, the real opportunity in this industry lies within the product, not distribution channels.

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Sheji Ho, aCommerce Group CMO

The local market is already saturated and mature with many fintech players moving into the space. What is missing is actually the innovation of insurance products and pricing.

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“There is wide open space to disrupt this industry as you can create micro-insurance products to sell online.”

Traditional companies should look to China for examples of different types of financial products such as insurance for kidnapping, mobile phones, ecommerce returns, etc.

The next class in the 10-week program is on Thursday October 12th and will take a look at the fundamentals of app marketing, as well as learning from an omni-channel case study of Central Online. Stay tuned for next week’s takeaways!

[LEAP Week 1] eIQ Insights: The New Ecommerce Opportunity in Thailand

[LEAP Week 2] eIQ Insights: Refinement of an Ecommerce Channel Strategy

[LEAP Week 3] eIQ Insights: Market-Product Fit First Before Anything

[LEA{ Week4] eIQ Insights: Central Marketing Group’s Shares Phase II of Digital Strategy

The first thing that comes to a consumer’s mind when asked about virtual reality (VR) often involves gaming.

Why? Because virtual reality is used to describe a three-dimensional, computer-generated environment that can be explored by a person. That person is immersed in a space where they are able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

The virtual reality technology buzz, whether in content or hardware, is projected to be worth $80 billion by 2025 globally, while gaming unsurprisingly will make up the largest share of an estimated value of $11.6 billion.

But the application of virtual reality is not limited to only video games. According to Jirayod Theppipit, CEO and Founder of Infofed, a VR content development startup, virtual reality can be used as a marketing strategy in almost every area.

“Dare we say that virtual reality is the future of content? The experience VR offers can solve the pain points of businesses in almost every industry.”

“People often associate virtual reality with gaming and we can’t blame them. Consumers in the gaming segment have the ability to afford new technology and gadgets,” continues Jirayod. “This is why they’ve adopted virtual reality before others.”

Instead of scrambling to compete in an already crowded gaming market overtaken by virtual reality gaming content creators like VRX, Infofed sees a blue ocean in real estate for virtual reality content in Thailand.

“I know this technology is going to take off because big players like Facebook and Google have already jumped into it.”

Two years ago, Facebook invested $2 billion into VR technology to promote its own VR headset Oculus and only earlier this year, Apple launched ‘ARKit’ to turn its iPhones and iPads into AR/VR (Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality) devices.

IKEA has already jumped on board with its new app, IKEA Place.

IKEA ecommerce

The highly affluential Chinese shoppers have also taken a liking to VR based on a survey by Worldpay, which has been a strong indicator of how content will be consumed in the future.

Phil Pomford, General Manager for Asia Pacific at Worldpay, says,

“China is blazing a trail for VR/AR adoption and showing other Asia Pacific markets what the future could look like…with China leading the way, Asian businesses should start investigating the future of VR/AR technology now, so that they’re ready to meet consumer demands as and when they arise.”

84% of 16,000 consumers surveyed across Asia Pacific believe that AR/VR is the future of shopping, 92% say they’d like to see more retail apps make use of AR/VR – Worldpay.

But for a nascent market like Thailand, can virtual reality successfully take off?

Infofed believes it already has.

ecommerceIQ speaks with Jirayod to understand how the two-year old startup has utilized VR in industries like tourism and education and what it has learned from its latest project, real estate.

Giving a slow-moving industry an upgrade

The current real estate industry in Thailand is experiencing slowing growth but the number of new condominium units are set to rise 15% from 2016.

To sell units, typical marketing tools often include flashy brochures with heavily photoshopped photos and miniature models in an attempt to give homebuyers a glimpse of the expensive home they should buy.

Higher-end real-estate developers will also set up a physical showroom for visitors to experience the ambience of the unit, but this requires travel and more effort than today’s digitalized world is used to.

Virtual Reality Infofed

The Deck, project by Sansiri. Source: Sansiri

“Because my background is in architecture, I can understand the blueprints and engineering language that the marketing material contains but there are many people who are confused by it. The current content in brochures and on websites aren’t extremely helpful for consumers who want to properly ‘experience’ the product.”

Through VR content, Infofed believes that its content can help developers market its products to consumers. What better way for someone to experience their new home than to actually walk through it?

The company has already worked together with Nirvana Property, one of the leading developers in Thailand, to showcase its showroom through virtual reality content.

 

Virtual Reality Infofed

Virtual reality Showroom for Nirvana Rama 2 by Infofed

Consumers are able to view the showroom in 360 degrees, simply through their electronic devices without the need of a virtual reality headset.

According to Jirayod, consumers on average spend up to five minutes viewing a VR showroom whereas they spend no more than two minutes flipping through a brochure.

“The longer consumers spend on our content, the more interest they develop in the product and reflects on a higher rate of purchase.”

The appeal of VR can also save real estate companies money to build and dismantle their showrooms – especially in trade shows and exhibitions. From Jirayod’s past architectural experience, building a showroom has an average cost of $60K for condominiums and $200K for houses.

Creating VR content, on the other hand, can start as low as $1,500 at Infofed according to Jirayod.

New age but in demand

Despite North America being the current leader in VR content market with a share of 73.4% in 2016, Asia Pacific is forecasted to exhibit higher growth.

Transparency Market Research has forecasted that this region will see an exponential CAGR of 116.1% between 2016 and 2024.

Virtual Reality Infofed

But in order to capture the opportunity VR presents, Infofed is committed to educating Thai consumers about new technology and training the people necessary to create VR content. One way it has done so is by creating content for influential industry players like the Tourism Authority of Thailand and leading real estate companies.

“It’s important that we help create build an ecosystem for virtual reality content. I have never viewed other virtual reality players as competitors but instead as partners to together push this technology out.”

Infofed has also brought in experts from the US through partnerships to equip its local staff with sufficient virtual reality knowledge to produce content. It’s also sharing its own experiences at top universities to educate the incoming digital-savvy workforce.

Virtual Reality Infofed

Infofed Team

All of the company’s efforts come down to one goal – to make Thailand a virtual reality society, even if it’s not fully ready now.

Popping up everywhere in product advertising, content marketing and online web stores is video. Companies like Buzzfeed and Dove were among the first to witness the effects of viral marketing through short popular three minute movie clips but it’s no longer businesses with large budgets that are taking advantage of a growing audience preference for moving visuals.

Samsung Galaxy S8 video ad that automatically plays upon page load. Source: TheStreet

Tools like Facebook ad format Collection and Facebook Live focus on video content to boost retail sales given that video posts have a 135% greater organic reach than photo posts. An Adidas’ campaign promoting various apparel items resulted in a 1.8X decrease in cost-per-conversion, according to the brand.  

SMEs in Thailand running an online auction through Facebook Live to sell products, usually clothing and accessories.

Based on majority of statistics floating around the web, data points to a healthy customer engagement with “video storytelling”.

According to Cisco, video is projected to claim more than 80% of all web traffic by 2019 and Forrester estimates that a video included in an email campaign will garner a 200-300% increase in click through rate.

Versus a still image, video content is more emotionally compelling and reinforces the messaging behind a brand and its product.

Watching a video is simple enough, but do they directly impact consumer behavior?

A recent whitepaper by Nielsen, “Cross Platform Report 2017”, conducted a survey to find out how Indonesians react after interacting with online video ads.

Respondents between the ages 21 – 49 were most likely to connect with a brand – call, go to store, purchase online – after watching an online video advertisement. Those over 50 years old were less likely to be affected by video content.

 

Source: Nielsen Cross Platform report 2017

But all that’s video is not gold

The message isn’t that every brand manager should grab a camcorder and throw their marketing budget into producing a product video.

Findings from market research firm in the US L2 Inc shares a cautious message,

“Brands invest heavily in video on a variety of platforms, including TV, YouTube, and social media. However, videos on the homepage can have a negative effect on site engagement metrics.

L2 found that the 56% of brands with video on the homepage actually saw shorter site visit times, fewer average pages per visit, and higher bounce rates than brands without video on their homepage.”

It may be too soon to judge whether video is the best method to achieve higher direct retail sales but companies such as ViSenze are creating technology that enables contextual advertising within a video.

On the other hand, video has been and remains one of the most effective ways to improve brand awareness and educate consumers. Just think of the heart-tugging Amazon Mother’s Day videos.

With Alibaba’s acquisition of Lazada and Southeast Asia’s mirror-like ecosystem to that of China, it’s no surprise that the region’s more popular marketplace is moving towards a more Tmall-like model.

The largest sign being the opportunity for brands to design their own shop-in-shop – called Tmall flagship stores in China. They drive on-site traffic and simply optimizing shop-in-shop text and images can lead to maximum conversions.

In this article, we look at some best practices from popular Tmall flagship stores in China and explore opportunities for brands to improve their shop-in-shop performance on marketplaces in Southeast Asia, specifically Lazada.

Best Practices for Shop-in-Shops: Learnings from China

Tmall’s shop-in-shop concept called flagship stores – 天猫旗舰店 in Chinese – became officially available to brands in 2010. Ever since then, global and local brands and retailers have opened their own branded stores on China’s biggest ecommerce platform.

They include Apple, P&G, Estee Lauder as well as retailers like Costco, Macy’s and even Amazon.

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

P&G store on Tmall

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Apple Tmall store

With the help of official TPs (Taobao Partners), agencies who help brands design and operate flagship stores, Tmall stores in China have undergone a massive transformation.

Although every brand has a unique Tmall flagship store identity, there are several patterns that successful brands employ that could be applied to marketplace presence in Southeast Asia, whether today or in the near future. They include:

  1. Bundling
  2. Rich, often video, content for branding, testimonials/social proof, and product tutorials/walkthroughs
  3. Coupons and promotions
  4. Flash sales and time-based offers
  5. Live chat (often split between pre-sales and post-sales live chat)
  6. Reviews management
  7. Unique store design
  8. Product detail page optimization (text, graphics)

Bundling

Bundling is a very common concept on Tmall brand stores because it helps brands achieve three things:

  1. Address channel-conflict, usually online, by creating ‘new’ products by combining them together into a single SKU.
  2. Increases average order values (AOVs) to offset delivery costs. This is frequently applied by CPGs such as Unilever, P&G and Coca-Cola whose products, if sold in single units, wouldn’t make sense for ecommerce.
  3. Quickly testing new product combinations and their traction. For offline retail, it often takes months to get new SKUs into the distribution chain and then another few months to get feedback from customers.
Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Example of P&G product bundling

Rich content for branding, testimonials/social proof, and product tutorials/walkthroughs

Tmall flagship stores have evolved over the last decade to become a viable alternative to brands’ creating their own ecommerce sites. Nowadays, Tmall allows brands to soup up their stores with not only banners and graphics but also more engaging videos.

Why is this important? Because viewers can be 64-85% more likely to purchase after watching a product video.

Below are examples of Estée Lauder and Johnson’s Baby using video on their Tmall flagship store homepages.

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Estée Lauder home page on Tmall rich in content

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Johnson & Johnson informative home page on Tmall

Coupons and Promotions

What is Tmall without promotions? Neutrogena’s flagship store has a dedicated section for coupons that can be redeemed and applied right away to increase chances of a browser converting.

Neutrogena coupons on Tmall flagship store

 

Johnson & Johnson’s Aveeno brand offers customers a chance to enter a lucky draw for each purchase.

P&G offers customers a gift set if they spend over 159 RMB, approximately $23.

Flash sales and time-based offers

Aveeno offers 50% off for buyers in the first 5 minute of its flash sale, limited to 1,000 units.

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Live chat (often split between pre-sales and post-sales live chat)

Often credited as one of the reasons why Alibaba/Taobao was able to defeat eBay in China is live chat. Since the early days, Taobao offered a way for customers to talk directly to merchants through it’s WangWang chat platform.

When Tmall spun off from Taobao, WangWang was also applied to the B2B2C Tmall model. Nowadays, customers can login and chat directly with the customer service reps of a brand’s Tmall flagship store.

Neutrogena offers dedicated chat lines for pre-sales and post-sales live chat.

Lazada Shop-in-ShopReview management

Tmall allows customers to leave reviews after their purchase and also for merchants to reply to their customers. This offers brands a way to manage their online reputation – something most brands have engaged TPs to help manage due to high volumes.

Below is an example of Neutrogena’s TP helping address a customer’s negative review.

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Store design

Having a great-looking and brand-aligned store design can mean the difference between a high and low conversion rate. In China, brands often engage TPs to help them not only manage but also design and decorate their stores.

Adidas’ Tmall flagship store design follows its brand guidelines so customers browsing the store will feel like they’re on the Adidas.com official brand site.

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

 

Product detail page optimization (text, graphics)

Product detail pages (PDP) don’t have to be bland and boring. Tmall’s official stores have taken PDP design to the next level by including high-res images, videos, customer reviews, company details/history, and much more. All this is to help increasing conversion rates by providing customers with as many relevant details as possible as well as establishing trust through brand consistency and social proof.

Left: Tide product detail page on P&G Tmall flagship store

Right: Tide product detail page on P&G Lazada Philippines shop-in-shop

Which one has a higher conversion rate?

Lazada Shop-in-Shop

Best Practices for Shop-in-Shops in Southeast Asia

Obviously, Chinese ecommerce and Tmall are several years ahead of Southeast Asia. However, as Lazada is already moving towards a Tmall model and offering more and more features to brands operating shop-in-shops, there are several best practices that can already be implemented for brands to benefit from:

  1. Brand-centric store design
  2. Rich (video) content
  3. Product detail page optimization (text, graphics)
  4. Onsite SEO
  5. Live chat
  6. Product sampling

Brand-centric store design

Launched as early as 2013, Maybelline was one of the first shop-in-shops on Lazada. As one of the pioneering brands in Thailand ecommerce, Maybelline’s Lazada shop-in-shop store design arguably is the most sophisticated, offering high-res, brand-aligned banners and creatives as well as video content.

Lazada Shop-in-ShopRich (video) content

Lazada offers YouTube video embeds that Maybelline has used to feature campaign and branding videos. Others like La Roche Posay are leveraging videos to explain how to use their products via walkthroughs.

Product detail page optimization (text, graphics)

Brands on Lazada still under perform in terms of PDP optimization. Most SKUs use only a few lines to describe the product and only a few brands have utilized images or videos to spruce up content.

Maybelline PDP on its Lazada Thailand shop-in-shop

Maybelline PDP on Tmall flagship store

Again, which one would convert better?

Onsite SEO

To gain organic traffic coming from Google and also from Lazada, brands should increase the amount of text on their homepage, category and product detail pages. Some of this is done by Lazada but brands should be actively driving this process, either directly or via partners.

Below is an example of the Maybelline Lazada Indonesia shop with footer text optimized for SEO.

 

Live chat

Live chat is pretty much the default standard on Tmall flagship stores but only a few brands are offering it on their Lazada shop-in-shops. One example is La Roche Posay who recently piloted a live chat feature on its Thailand Lazada shop-in-shop for a short trial period that has since ended.

 

Product sampling

Another unique feature that’s currently being piloted on some Lazada shop-in-shops is product sampling. Purina One’s shop on Lazada has a link out to a form where users can sign up to receive free samples. This is a great way for brands to not only acquire new users for their CRM database but also increase the exposure of new products.

As ecommerce continues to develop in our region, more brands are faced with the choice to set up on popular marketplaces or build their own brand.com website.

Setting up shop on marketplaces is more than simply uploading product pictures and hoping for a sale – it requires a similar strategy to setting up a brand.com. Businesses on marketplaces shouldn’t forget about the variety of tools available to them to influence sales and conversion rates and can either choose to do this themselves or partner with a specialist, “TP” in Southeast Asia.


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Betagro marketing

The rise of technology and the internet isn’t just disrupting traditional retailers; it’s also enabling brands to reach their customers directly without the need of a ‘middleman’. Dollar Shave Club effectively sold to their loyal subscribers without ad agencies, traditional media or offline distributors like Walmart and Walgreens.

With the Death of The Advertising Industrial Complex looming upon us, traditional, mass advertising such as outdoor, print, TV and distribution through offline brick and mortar retail are rendered inefficient. Companies like Unilever have no choice but to acquire ‘the little guys’ like Dollar Shave Club to stay relevant.

It doesn’t end here. Fresh off their $1 billion acquisition of DSC, Unilever is already in talks to buy Jessica Alba’s Honest Co. for another $1 billion.

The Advantages of Moving Towards Direct-To-Consumer

In many of his speeches, Alibaba’s founder and chairman Jack Ma talks about how the world is moving from Information Technology (IT) to Data Technology (DT). In a DT world, businesses have direct relationships with consumers, enabling the former to collect data to build and market products and services personalized to the latter.

One classic example is Xiaomi, the Chinese electronics company and 4th largest smartphone maker, who sells attractively priced smartphones on its website to drive the direct relationship with its users. The company then uses the data to push peripheral products, plush toys, software, and online and mobile advertising.

Amazon is the other example, selling other people’s products at lower margins to get the volume it needs to monetize through marketplace fees and Prime subscriptions:

Amazon, meanwhile, is transitioning to a new model completely. The vast majority of Amazon’s products are increasingly sold with little to no margin at all: profitability comes from fees paid by third-party merchants and Prime subscriptions. It is a model that is completely dependent on scale, and the lower the margin and thus prices, the higher Amazon’s volume, which means ever more leverage from Amazon’s massive fixed costs in infrastructure and logistics.” – Ben Thompson, Stratechery

This transition from IT to DT is exactly what Unilever is trying to achieve through its acquisitions of Dollar Shave Club and Honest Co. Both firms enjoy better margins through online marketing and distribution. More importantly, they own the direct customer relationship, which they leverage into higher customer lifetime values through innovative models like subscription commerce.

Direct-to-Consumer Accelerated in China and Southeast Asia

China and Southeast Asia are growth markets unburdened by a legacy offline retail infrastructure meaning brands are jumping over the middleman at a much faster pace than in mature markets like the US, Europe or Japan.

Why did internet ecommerce grow so much faster in China than in the US? Because the infrastructure of commerce in China was bad. Unlike here, where you have all the (physical) shops: Walmart, K-Mart, everything, everywhere. But in China, we have nothing, nowhere. So ecommerce in the US is just a dessert; it’s complementary to the main business. But in China, it’s the main course.”Jack Ma, Founder and Chairman, Alibaba

An example of traditional, non-conventional brands going direct to consumer is Yurun Group, China’s second-largest meat supplier in China. Based in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, Yurun operates in two sectors, chilled and frozen meat, and processed meat products, which are marketed under the brand names of Yurun, Furun, Wangrun, and Popular Meat Packing.

Yurun operates an official Tmall flagship store through which the company sells its various brands and products and also distributes digital vouchers.

Betagro marketingBetagro marketing

Betagro marketing

Capturing the Direct-to-Consumer Opportunity Through Digital Transformation

Fashion, electronics, and consumer packaged goods (CPG) aren’t the only categories that are increasingly being sold online. Let’s take a look at Betagro, a 50-year old Thai food manufacturing conglomerate, and identify the opportunities available for the company to go direct-to-consumer and transform itself to capitalize on today’s digitally-savvy consumer.

Who is Betagro?

Betagro Group was founded in 1967 by Dr. Chaivat Taepaisitphongse, the company’s current chairman. Headquartered in Bangkok, Betagro engages in animal feed production, livestock, animal health products, and food product businesses. The company is known for its brands like S-Pure eggs, Better Food, and Dog’n Joy pet food.

Betagro Value Chain & Gap Analysis

Below is a simplified overview of Betagro’s value chain. We specifically looked at Marketing and Sales & Distribution, two areas that are typically impacted by internet, ecommerce and technology.

Betagro mainly sells through retail partners like Tops, Tesco Lotus, Big C, and Family Mart and its own distribution channels, namely Betagro Shops, with a footprint of over 100 in Thailand. Unlike its main competitor Charoen Pokphand Foods PCL, who has access to massive distribution through its 8,000+ 7-Eleven branches in Thailand – Betagro still has to rely on partners.

From a marketing perspective, like many other traditional business in Thailand, Betagro still uses offline channels such as event marketing through roadshows, mall booths, etc. and sampling in supermarkets. Its online efforts are limited to its corporate website Betagro.com, which is lackluster, and content marketing on its “Betagro Society” YouTube and Facebook pages.

Betagro marketingMaximizing Marketing Opportunities

To maximize the company’s online efforts, there exists many opportunities across the user journey for specifically Content Marketing and Influencer and Affiliate Marketing that we highlight here. 

betagro marketing

Content Marketing: Videos

Given the very nature of its business, content marketing is a great way to educate, activate and engage customers for Betagro. Similar to how Dollar Shave Club leveraged its now cult-like “Our Blades Are F**king Great” viral video to spur its initial hyper growth, Betagro can create cooking videos and online recipes to engage their audience and build brand identity.

Betagro’s official music video on YouTube garnered over 5 million views in less than one year’s time. Although impressive, it pales in comparison to short-form cooking videos on Facebook like those by Tasty, some racking up over 30 million views in less than 12 hours.

Betagro marketing

Betagro marketing

Facebook’s powerful short-form, auto-play videos are now being applied by food business in Thailand such as Unilever’s Best Foods.

Content Marketing: Recipes

Best Food’s US website is another great example of using online recipes for SEO and engagement. While Betagro’s website mainly covers corporate information, Unilever’s BestFoods.com offers many recipes that allow the brand to display their products in attractive high-res imagery – selling without direct selling.

Betagro marketing

Having recipes online not only helps with engagement but also with SEO, resulting in an increase in organic traffic from Google. A quick look at Similar Web data for BestFoods.com shows top keywords are all recipe-related ones.

Betagro marketing

Influencer & Affiliate Marketing

Facebook paid advertising is one way to distribute content for Betagro. Another – and sometimes more efficient way – is to leverage influencers or “Key Opinion Leaders” (KOLs). In Thailand, due to a “no-tail” environment, a lot of these KOLs are on Facebook instead of having their own blogs or websites. Below is a list of popular cooking and food related KOLs.

Betagro marketing

Betagro could partner with these KOLs to educate and increase brand awareness through text and video content directed at an audience with interest in their products. In the Mai Yom Auon example above, the page owner cooks using a pan provided by the advertiser Korea King.

Another way to leverage these KOLs is by adding them to an affiliate program where the aim is to drive traffic to a future Betagro ecommerce website – either in the form of a brand.com or shop-in-shop on a marketplace.

Betagro marketing

Betagro marketing

Betagro marketing

Influencers can post a ‘shop’ on their official Facebook page to showcase the brand’s products to their fans.

 

Monetization: Ecommerce

The amount of distributors for Betagro products are limited leaving the company to the mercy of its retail partners such as Tesco Lotus and Family Mart. But by offering its products online, Betagro is able to increase its leverage vis-à-vis these partners as well as collect data from the end consumer.

Similar brands have already started doing so such as Yurun Group in China on Tmall and Globo Foods in Thailand on Lazada.

Betagro marketingBetagro marketingBetagro marketing

Monetization: Online-to-Offline

Betagro can also leverage digital channels to drive offline sales. For example, Honestbee and HappyFresh are food delivery apps that are being used by major food retail distributors across Southeast Asia.

By partnering with these companies, Betagro can help drive foot traffic to offline Betagro Shops as well as promote and advertise Betagro brands and products.

betagro-happyfresh

By implementing the marketing strategies mentioned above, Betagro will be able to expand their audience, increase sales and jump ahead of competitors. The best part?  without largely denting their budget.

Written by Sheji Ho, aCommerce Group CMO

Betagro Case Study: Direct-to-Consumer Opportunity Through Digital Transformation Full Download