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The Background

Name any Chinese bike-sharing company that you know of and chances are that ofo and Mobike are among your top choices. There is however, another bike-sharing company worth talking about.

Founded as early as November of last year, Bluegogo is a Tianjin-based bike-sharing firm and has quickly become the third largest company of its kind in China, following, of course, ofo and Mobike.

Similar to its competitors, the dockless bike-sharing brand is equipped with a GPS tracker and users book the bikes through the Bluegogo app.

Because the bikes are station-less, they are scattered random spots throughout the city. In the first half of 2017 alone, Bluegogo already has 70,000 bikes in three Chinese cities: 35,000 in Shenzhen, 25,000 bikes in Guangzhou, and 10,000 in Chengdu.

Source: Mashable

Bluegogo has drawn several investors to fund its business and was valued at $140 million after pocketing a Series A round of $21 million in November last year and $58 million earlier this year.

With two large funds raised within a single year, the company seemed to be performing well in China that it began looking into overseas expansion to leverage the hype surrounding the share economy. What could possibly go wrong?

The Challenge

Like other share-economy startups, think Uber, ofo, etc., Bluegogo needed to find a way to become profitable.

One way to prove its worth to investors is its ability to expand.

“Bluegogo, being a latecomer to the bike-share game, needs to be aggressive” – Mashable

Bluegogo has not only been aggressive in expansion at home but also reaching as far as the US. The Chinese company chose San Francisco, the second most bike-friendly city in the States as its first venture into North America.

In January this year, the company was the first smartphone-enabled bike-sharing platform to launch some 20,000 dockless bikes in San Francisco, USA.

However, Bluegogo’s American Dream was not smooth sailing. Instead of a warm welcome by SF city dwellers accustomed to miles of bike lanes and high quality cycling facilities, Bluegogo faced angry lawmakers.

The company having achieved rapid success in China, implemented the same strategy in the US by placing dockless bikes everywhere on the streets of San Francisco. The problem was that the city ended up with large, messy and unsightly piles of bikes.

Leftover bikes from bike-sharing firms such as Bluegogo pile up in China. Source: Mashable

San Francisco has historically been known for its welcome mat, but in recent years we’ve let ourselves become a doormat. It’s time to put the public’s interests first, even if that means disrupting the disruptors,” said Aaron Peskin, Supervisor of the San Francisco Board.

Peskin even called the bikes a “public nuisance,” and vowed to destroy or even sell the bikes if they clogged up city streets.

In Bluegogo’s defense,

There was a problem in communicating,” said Ilya Movshovich, BlueGoGo‘s North America VP of Operations. “The people we reached out to initially were not the people we needed to get to. We didn’t quickly enough communicate with the appropriate heads.”

Until even now, San Francisco has yet to approve Bluegogo’s presence and even imposed a new law to increase the penalty for Chinese bike-sharing companies planning to litter its city.

If expansion wasn’t success, monetization would have to come from deposits provided by Bluegogo’s claimed 20 million cumulative users. If only 10 million users paid a $14.96 deposit, it would mean the company has collected around $149 million in deposits, in addition to the $0.08 per half hour charge to ride.

So why was the company owing roughly $30 million in total outstanding payables to vendors, unpaid rent and overdue salaries?

Bluegogo’s empty Beijing office. Source: China Money Network

It also owed users $15 million worth of deposits as of November 2017.

To make things even worse, Bluegogo’s CEO Li Gang went missing early November 2017 and was later discovered to have fled the country. What was this once promising company going to do?

Li Gang, Bluegogo’s CEO. Source: Linkedin

The Strategy

In attempt to explain the disastrous situation, Li released an open apology letter. As cliché as it sounded, he blamed the company’s state on lack of financial support, claiming that Bluegogo was ‘on thin ice in the face of two well-funded players’, pointing fingers at ofo and Mobike backed by Tencent and Ant Financial, respectively.

The bike-sharing market is full of challenges, and my mind is too childish and naive to succeed in the sector.” – Li Gang

But there could be some light at the end of the tunnel. Li took the opportunity to announce a partnership with another small bike-sharing startup called Biker, who would be in charge of operating Bluegogo as usual under its management.  

The Future

The merger of small startups like Bluegogo and Biker is considered to be a typical one for competitive and costly markets. Li admitted that he will use the revenue generated from the partnership with Biker to pay off its debt.

Bike-sharing is an asset-heavy industry. As investors become increasingly cautious and reasonable about their bet, a timely merger or acquisition may be the only chance for second-tier players to survive,” – said Shi Rui, Analyst with consulting firm iResearch

Despite a promising partnership with Biker, there has been no word from the company itself to confirm the partnership.

The fall of Bluegogo has spurred the question, has the bike-share economy bubble finally burst?

There have already been three Chinese bike-sharing startups – Xiaoming Bike, Mingbike, and Coolqi – collapsing within a span of one year; the latter actually teaming up with Biker.

Even ofo and Mobike investors are said to be in talks for a possible merger to survive in China’s bike-sharing market, which was estimated to be worth $1.5 billion this year. Is the future of bike-sharing M&A and endless funds?

Without support from a wide range of investors and good financial planning capabilities, even the best bike product is powerless,” wrote Li Gang.

We beg to differ. A company that relies on solely on funding in the long run needs to rethink its business model. Good luck Bluegogo/Biker/Coolqi.

THE BACKGROUND

Asia Pacific really likes their whisky.

The gold liquid makes up 40% of multinational alcoholic beverage company DIAGEO sales in Asia, compared to only 25% of its global sales. One of the brands that sit under the behemoth is Johnnie Walker, the world’s most widely distributed blended whiskies.

The immensely popular liquor started out life in 19th century Scotland when John “Johnnie” Walker began selling it from his grocery shop. It was his son, Alexander Walker, who took the elixir global with a simple distribution model.

Shippers would take the bottled whisky with them on their journeys around the world, sell them, take a commission and handover remaining profits to the firm. Over 100 years later, the brand sells over 120 million bottles across 200 countries in bars, restaurants, breweries and lounges.

Four bottles of Johnnie Walker are consumed every second” – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 

So the question arises, if in today’s digital world, people can order clothing, groceries, razors and even pets online, why not alcohol?

Companies like Drizly, Saucey, Paneco, Wishbeer and yes, Johnnie Walker, are attempting to offer their own solutions to ensure that consumers can enjoy a drink at any time of the day, but not many have found lasting success.

The Challenge

After shutting down its luxury e-tail site “Alexander & James” after a short four year run, DIAGEO publicly acknowledged that it was struggling to find success in online direct-to-consumer, referring to it as,

A pot of gold at the end of the rainbow that you need to keep on chasing.”

The company recently lost its place to Kweichow Moutai as reigning liquor market leader in China as the Chinese taste shifted to premium brands, especially for gifts and elaborate events.

DIAGEO Online

Moutai’s market capitalisation reached $71.5 billion on the Shanghai exchange in April, while Diageo’s London capitalization is $71.1 billion. Source: FT and Bloomberg.

In light of the company’s closure of “A & J” earlier this year citing that “consumers don’t look for specialty shops online”, the company is shifting focus to sell its products on platforms like Amazon and Tesco.

A partnership with a mass marketplace is appealing for two reasons; (1) it already has a large audience and (2) enables the sale of DIAGEO products online.

“We can raise awareness, but if they can’t buy the products, it’s void. [The partnership with Amazon] gives us that complete circle – we can entertain and educate viewers with how-to guides, and then make it as easy as possible for them to make the purchase,” said Johanna Dalley, World Class Global Director at Diageo Reserve.

“It’s the perfect storm – we are creating content that inspires people to buy our brands, and we can directly look at conversion and click-through rates.”

But what happens when strict regulations in emerging markets like Thailand prohibit the use of photos or celebrities to promote the brand’s lifestyle?

THE STRATEGY

Big C, one of Thailand’s largest retailers, offers a range of beverages from beer to wine online but the website states it cannot display any photos/logos/names of alcohol due to the country’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Act.

DIAGEO Online

Big C product selection for liquor on its website. Thailand has banned the promotion of alcoholic beverages sales but many companies risk the fine.

On the other hand, Wine Connection and Wishbeer, both operate websites in Thailand that contain photos of wine bottles, craft beers and sales. The companies are risking the 150,000 – 200,000 THB ($6,040) in hopes of a stronger payout.

A fair assumption given a recent study found that approximately 30% of Thai people started to drink alcohol after seeing images of their favourite celebrities posed with drinks.

If DIAGEO is willing to risk the fine, which no reports indicate it has ever been enforced, it has a strong direct-to-consumer opportunity in Southeast Asia – especially Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines – because of the region’s growing online adoption and preference for spirits and beer.

DIAGEO Online

Source: Chartsbin

DIAGEO, in particular Johnnie Walker, has long been eyeing emerging markets. Brazil, Mexico, Thailand, and China are some of the brand’s top seven global markets.

How has the company approached selling in these markets?

In Diageo’s case, the company has created a four-part ecommerce strategy:

  1. Developing a strategy and getting its ‘house in order’ (internal restructuring, hiring, etc.)
  2. On-trade and off-trade strategy
  3. Activating ecommerce channels (strategic partnerships with pure players, delivery companies, etc.)
  4. Direct to consumer through individual brand websites

Anyone looking at DIAGEO’s key moves in the online space cannot say the company hasn’t tried.

In 2016, the company announced a partnership with Deliveroo to offer an ‘alcohol-on demand’ service called thebar.com in certain areas in the UK. It’s a similar and popular strategy like Wine Connection’s partnership with delivery company, honestbee, in Thailand.

DIAGEO Online

honestbee home delivery of Wine Connection products.

Charles Ireland, Diageo GM for Great Britain, Ireland and France, says DIAGEO is spending more money on digital platforms like Google, Facebook, Instagram and even dating app Tinder, than traditional media for the first time. The goal is to use videos and other forms of content to educate and raise awareness.

“There is a shift towards content marketing within Diageo more broadly. In terms of monetisation, we will see more partnerships with Amazon from a commercial perspective. Other retailers are content hungry too, and are looking for content for their websites. [We will] provide them with content if it helps people click through to purchase,” said Dalley.

THE FUTURE

In Asia, the demand for alcohol is not the problem when beer sales consistently outpace GDP growth like in Vietnam since 2009. The biggest challenge is lack of awareness and oscillating regulations.

“In terms of direct to consumer [selling], I think there are consumer goods companies that are doing it quite successfully, but we haven’t quite hit a successful formula yet and we’re continually working on it,” says Charles.

Keep walking Johnnie, you’ll get there.

After superpower China announced earlier this week that it has banned Initial Coin Offerings (ICO), the value of bitcoin fell 11.4%immediately after. Circulating speculations claim the ban will impact the large amounts of capital raised from ICO, a total of more than $1.7 billion from January to early September 2017.

What is ICO and bitcoin? What impact does it have on businesses and why did China, one of the world’s most influential countries, ban something so lucrative?

What is bitcoin?

Invented by the then-unknown creator Satoshi Nakamoto in 2009, bitcoin is a ‘peer-to-peer’ electronic currency. It has no physical form so it does not require a central location to store.

In other words, bitcoin runs independently from banks and financial institutions and without any involvement from those institutions, bitcoin transactions are ‘free of charge’ but this also means if they get stolen or lost, there is no possible way to recover losses.

ICO Explained

Craig Wright, an Australian entrepreneur, who claimed in 2016 that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, creator of bitcoin. Source: The Economist.

Cryptocurrency is any currency associated with the internet that uses cryptography – the process of converting legible information into an almost uncrackable code, to track purchases and transfers.

Cryptography was created to cater to the need for secure communications in the Second World War. It has evolved in the digital era thanks to mathematical theory and computer science, to become a way to secure communications, information and money online.

Bitcoin was the first cryptocurrency, other examples include Ethereum and Ether.

How does it work?

To buy or sell bitcoin, users need to have a bitcoin wallet installed on their desktop or mobile devices. The identity of users are kept anonymous but transactions are tracked with digital identification comprised of a bitcoin address and a private key.

Think of your bitcoin address as a transparent safety deposit box. Everyone knows what is inside but only the private key can access it. These “safety deposit boxes” are public logs called blockchain.

How do you get bitcoin in the first place? Users typically take part in mining.

Mining is the act of verifying bitcoin transactions by contributing computing power to match private key to bitcoin address. Whenever a new block of transactions is created, it is added to the chain of blocks, hence the name. Still with us?

For comparison’s sake, blockchain technology  is similar to Google Docs.

Before the arrival of Google Docs, users could only edit documents via Microsoft Word one person at a time because two users couldn’t edit a document simultaneously. With Google Docs, both parties have access to the same document at the same time if they are provided access.

Blockchain technology is like a shared document, but it is a shared ledger.

What is bitcoin used for?

Blockchain solves two challenging problems associated with digital transactions: securing information and avoiding duplication making the technology widely applicable to multiple use cases.

It also eliminates all the pain points with transferring money through traditional methods: crossing borders, rescheduling for bank holidays, high bank fees, failed/dropped transfers, etc.

“The blockchain is an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value.” – Don & Alex Tabscott, Blockchain Revolution

Because bitcoin allows users to stay anonymous, it has raised concerns in its application to facilitate drug deals, money laundering and illegal purchases. But as with all crime, there is a price to pay if caught.

“But if you catch people using something like Silk Road [bitcoin market], you’ve uncovered their whole criminal history,” Sarah Meiklejohn, computer scientist at University College London, says. “It’s like discovering their books.”

In more positive applications, tech giants like IBM are utilizing blockchain technology for information storage in healthcare, government, and supply chain for its accuracy and transparency.

Estimated spending on blockchain technology by banks in 2019 can be as high as $400 million.

ICO Explained

The price of bitcoin has fluctuated aggressively since it became popular in 2013 when prices rose by almost 10,000% before the biggest online bitcoin exchange sent it crashing.

Telegraph recently reported that there are currently 15 million bitcoins in circulation, each of which is worth $4,231 (as of September 2017). A single bitcoin’s sharp increase in value has many sceptics believing that we are in a bubble.

ICO Explained

Back full circle, what’s the big deal with ICO?

Similar to an Initial Public Offering (IPO), an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is when a company offers a chance to invest in a new cryptocurrency. Instead of trading shares, companies exchange their newly created cryptocurrencies, known as tokens in ICO…essentially, code.

An example would be OmiseGO ICO in August, when the payments company raised $25 million selling its OMG tokens. Since then, many news outlets are reporting millions of dollars raised in selling cryptocurrencies in a matter of a few hours.

China banned ICO because its legality is described as ‘undefined’ and it was only in July this year that US regulators began looking into it.

According to Sun Guofeng, director general of the Chinese Central Bank, banning ICO was a necessary move to stop illegal fund raising.

China-based ICOs raised about $400 million through 65 offerings with more than 100,000 investors. If it all came crashing down, China would be in hot water.

What is the future of ICO around the world and in Southeast Asia?

To clarify, holding cryptocurrencies in China by private parties is still legal. The People’s Bank of China only makes it illegal for financial institutions to hold or transact in them. It does not mean that there is no opportunity for Chinese developers and service providers in cryptocurrency.

While countries are slowly trying to control ICOs, the Southeast Asian market sees bitcoin as an opportunity to improve the financial maturity of its citizens, over 70% of whom are unbanked.

Singapore has been dubbed to be the next ICO hotbed given its a favorable location for startups, favorable regulatory standards, and supportive tax measures.

And developing markets like Vietnam are embracing digital currency as showcased by smart vending machine startup Dropfoods that announced its ICO this week and Myanmar’s SKYBIT that aims to open the country to a global market through bitcoin.

Bitcoin is not evil. Digital currency is not the bad guy. What has fueled the “ICO bubble” uproar is the excessive optimism that is outweighing rationality that usually comes with smart investing.

Tokens purchased by “investors” in an ICO can be used to transfer value within the new coin’s ecosystem, or to other cryptocurrencies’ ecosystems. The problem is that there is a high likelihood these ICO projects will fail. Why?

Take it from the creator of a famous cryptocurrency.

“Many firms are issuing a coin not because it makes sense to do so, but because they have a product they can sell quickly.” – Ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin

Is it possible to share everything?

Umbrellas? Molisan, E Umbrella, OTO
Basketballs? Zhulegeqiu
Power banks? Meituan-Dianping, Xiaodian, Jiedian
Concrete? Duola
Bicycles? Ofo, Mobike

Above are a few examples of China’s recent headline startups that seem to believe so. They’re banking on a collaborative economy in order to build sustainable businesses.

“Ridesharing, apartment/home lending, peer-to-peer lending, reselling, coworking, talent-sharing, etc. The sharing economy or collaborative economy, is taking off in all sorts of niches.”Forbes

Cars and homes made sense, not at first, but Uber and Airbnb have clearly been very successful platforms that connect users to existing resources. But these are success stories siloed in developed markets, not Southeast Asia or China.  

The basis for these models seem to be the same: consumers are willing to pay to ‘borrow’ services/products for a period of time and eventually, there is profit to be made in the distant future and companies can collect valuable user data.

Critics may be skeptical that any of these power bank or umbrella sharing startups can be successful but there has been no lack of capital backing, currently around $25 billion in total.

The sharing economy also reached a staggering 4 trillion yuan last year (USD $502 billion).

ecommerceIQ

Chinese basketball sharing startup Zhulegeqiu.

Chinese basketball sharing startup Zhulegeqiu was recently injected with a $1.4 million venture investment from Modern Capital, a Shanghai-based venture capital firm, in May. But raising capital is not a strong indicator for a good business model.

Have we not learned from the fall of “Uber for X” business model fad?

Let’s say we forget about profitability or the fact that these startups incur high costs by owning the inventory – what other factors are required to make a sharing startup tick? And is the industry conscious of the longevity of these startups suddenly popping up in China and Southeast Asia?

Trust ‘em or clean up the mess  

A share economy relies heavily on a trust system. If someone is borrowing a bicycle for a rate of 5 THB (USD $0.15) per hour, what is the likelihood a USD $300 bicycle will be returned in perfect condition or be left in a convenient location for the next rider?

Zhuang Ji, director of a social media ‘bike hunter’ group in China recently inspected 983 Ofo bikes in six cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Wuhan and Chengdu) and discovered the following:

  • 19 percent were damaged
  • 15 percent were unlocked
  • 12 percent had been stolen for private use
  • 2 percent were being ridden by children under the age of 12

Dump of broken bicycles from multiple share economy bike businesses in China.On the other hand, Umbrella sharing startup, E Umbrella, in China suffered a loss of almost all 300,000 of its umbrellas across 11 cities.

ecommerceIQ

Dump of broken bicycles from multiple share economy bike businesses in China.

Let’s do the math:

Loss → Cost of umbrellas: 300,000 x USD $8.82 (cost per umbrella) = USD $2,626,000

Gain → Customer deposit: 300,000 x USD $2.90 (customer deposit) = USD $870,000
Gain→ Raised capital: USD $ 1,470,000  

Total: minus USD $286,000

The loss isn’t too shocking when the business model relies on what Vox calls, “unpredictable weather and forgetful people”.

But founder Zhao Shuping is certain to succeed and plans to introduce 30 million more umbrellas across China by end of year. And like most of the other ‘share companies’, E Umbrella says advertising will be the main driver of revenue after announcing a partnership with ride-hailing app Didi Chuxing.

ecommerceIQ

Umbrellas waiting for users to ‘borrow’ in China.

Southeast Asia’s not ready.

Chinese bike-sharing giant Ofo recently entered Thailand by introducing its bikes to Bangkok university campuses. A brave move after competitor oBike was deemed a scam by the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) soon after its launch and never took off.  

An analyst told Forbes that China’s economic downturn – roughly a slowdown from 7% to 6% real GDP – is making people less willing to purchase goods, creating opportunities for the sharing market.

The opposite can be said for the region, where the Philippines and Vietnam are propelling the region’s 5% average real GDP growth and Myanmar alone is expected to grow by more than 7% in 2017 and 2018.  

“After all these years, China is finally embracing its communist roots,” said Andy Tian, an entrepreneur and co-founder of Asia Innovations Group in Beijing. “That’s the essence of communism: communal sharing.”

“But there’s no question that it’s a bubble,” he added. “It may have roots in something valuable, but can you really share everything?”

China’s booming sharing economy is said to be attributed to a “surplus of money and shortage of good ideas” so it’s probably best not to follow in their footsteps.

Here’s what you should know today:

1. President of Indonesia signed the ecommerce road map

President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has signed the long-awaited ecommerce road map that was expected to be issued at the end of this year

The road map will provide guidelines for the country’s digital economy sector, including issues such as payment, logistics, cyber securities, taxation, human resources development and consumer protection.

The ministry was also designing a measure to record online transaction information from the marketplace, in coordination with the Finance Ministry, Central Statistics Agency (BPS) and Bank Indonesia.

Read the full story here.

2. Facebook enters China with photo sharing app

Facebook is testing a photo-sharing app called Colorful Balloons in China after banned in the country since 2009.

Colorful Balloons works like Facebook’s Moments app by allowing users to share photos with friends and family members.

However, instead of using Facebook’s interface, it relies on WeChat, and was released by a local company called Youge Internet Technology.

Read the full story here.

3. Indonesia’s niche ecommerce players attract JD.com 

Chinese internet giant JD.com continues to show its interest in the market by pursuing new partnership with niche ecommerce players in Indonesia. The company is also said to be open to making an equity investment.

JD.com is learnt to be interested in partnering with Laku6 although that relationship may not be an equity based one. The firm aslo recently participated in Traveloka’s $500 million funding round.

The rumour of its talks for investment in Tokopedia has been around for months with its rival Alibaba also showing interest in closing the deal.

Read the full story here.

Discretionary spending, the act of buying things you don’t need by McKinsey’s definition, has been on the rise in China (unsurprisingly) as monthly disposable income of urban households double.

 

Spending expected to grow from $0.64 trillion (2000) to $4.38 trillion (2020). Source: McKinsey 2017

What does this mean? More Chinese shoppers, as well as Southeast Asians, are spending on items that are categorized as ‘semi-necessities’ (ex. high-end skin care lotions, designer hand bags, etc.).  

As one professor and author studying Chinese consumerism puts it,

“I think the Chinese dream is the American dream plus 10%.”

What’s important to note is that a growing portion of this spending is happening outside of the country.

58 million users in China are expected to engage in cross-border transactions in 2017 and cross-border ecommerce alone is expected to reach 7.5 trillion RMB ($1.1 trillion USD) this year.

Korea, Japan and the US are currently the most popular destinations for the Chinese to find products that they believe are better quality, worth the price and guarantee authenticity – some of the reasons why they shop overseas.

Recently stepping into the limelight is neighbour and resource-rich Southeast Asia, that has recently landed on China’s radar.  

Where do China-Southeast Asia trade relations stand?

China’s no. 1 and no. 2 ecommerce behemoths, Alibaba and JD.com respectively, are already directing the world’s attention to the region through recent activities. The former increased its stake in the region’s largest e-marketplace Lazada to 83% and the latter continues to fortify its local presence in Indonesia and Thailand and rumoured to be investing in existing ecommerce player Tokopedia.

The One Belt, One Road initiative that plans to build extensive roads, power plants, bridges, etc. to connect over 60 countries received financing from Chinese President Xi JinPing earlier this year.

How One Belt, One Road will connect over 60 countries. Source: Quartz

The super power’s leader pledged $109 billion SGD ($80 billion USD) to the “project of the century”.

It’s also easier to do business in China without a license as the country’s highest government authority previously approved 10 cities with a large number of warehouses for expedited handling of cross-border ecommerce purchases by customers.

Foreign retailers/brands can store merchandise they bring into China duty-free, and then send items as they are ordered through customs under the relaxed cross-border ecommerce rules.

Calculations from May 2016 counted total two-way investments between China and ASEAN countries to be over $160 billion despite political turmoil over the South China Sea.

As the gates open for easier trade between China and Southeast Asia – both literally and figuratively – businesses should have an eye open for opportunities in the other market.

It makes sense for brands operating in China to be marketing in Southeast Asia, especially when Alibaba holds around 60-70% China’s ecommerce market share and no player has more than 25% of the total cross-border ecommerce market share.

The Chinese giant long launched its very own Taobao shop-in-shop (SIS) on Lazada to target price-sensitive Singaporean shoppers with over 400,000 Chinese products.

“Southeast Asia is an attractive FDI destination for China because of its fast-growing and large domestic market,” said Lee Ju Ye Maybank economist in Singapore.

Jack Ma has also long-expressed introducing businesses to China.

These were snippets of an interview Ma participated in June this year,

“We’re interested in bringing local products to the world, to China. This has always been our focus.”

“For Thailand’s small and medium-sized ecommerce companies, don’t worry. If they want to compete with us in bringing Thai products to China and the world, maybe it’s tough, but if they do serve the customers locally, it would be great.”

In order to do this, companies in Southeast Asia need to capture Chinese consumers by bypassing marketplaces and selling direct to consumers through localized content marketing and offering products that the Chinese are already hungrily looking for.

Popular overseas goods include red wine, fresh produce such as avocados, milk and fruits.  

A BCG study also found that before Chinese customers decide to make a purchase, consumers make contact with a product through seven different touch points on average, such as store displays, product promotions, or social-media comments.  
The opportunities seem endless (keeping in mind tax revisions) or as Louis Li, the Deputy General Manager of JD Worldwide wants to remind the rest of the world, “don’t forget about China.”