Here’s what you need to know today.

1. Amazon source reveals Southeast Asia strategy

What markets are Amazon targeting? The source said Singapore will serve as the company’s launching pad to sell food throughout Australia and Southeast Asia, while another hub in Vietnam will eventually allow Amazon to sell into other Southeast Asian countries and parts of China. The Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia are viewed as target markets.

Going local Amazon will try to source locally as much as possible to cut costs, but if it does have to ship it in, they’ll ship it from Singapore. They’ll start putting a lot of inventory in Singapore, which means that an Australian customer will most likely get their product from Singapore, not the US.

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2. Alibaba goes Down Under to help businesses go global

Alibaba Group has launched its latest overseas headquarters in Melbourne this past weekend. The new office will support 1,300 Australian and 400 New Zealand businesses selling on Tmall and Tmall Global.

What else is Alibaba planning to do in Australia? The giant plans on building the entire operating infrastructure for regional businesses to expand globally, which includes cloud computing, online payments and logistics.

Not to mention Ma also signed a memorandum of understanding with Australia Post to bring the state-run logistics firm to Southeast Asia’s ecommerce market via Alibaba-owned Lazada Group.

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3. Singaporean startup Yojee uses AI and blockchain to help logistics businesses

Yojee has built software that uses AI and the blockchain to help logistics businesses coordinate their fleets and make the most out of existing last-mile delivery infrastructure.

The system is powered by machine learning and automatically assigns delivery jobs to drivers, reducing the need for a human dispatcher. This lowers costs for logistics providers and makes deliveries faster for customers. It also uses blockchain technology to track transactions and deliveries so that they can always be verified.

Tackling the last mile problem: “A recurring message from founders and CEOs was that selling is getting easier because the market is growing, but delivery is still very difficult,” said co-founder and CEO, Ed Clarke.

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