Emerging markets continue to drive the global sales of smartphones as its citizens discover the internet for the first time.

Southeast Asia’s smartphone shipments grew by 6.5% last year, recording nearly 28 million devices. Its largest market, Indonesia, is projected to be the four largest market for smartphones by 2020, reaching almost $10 billion in sales.

One of the global household names eyeing the region is Apple.

The company has been attempting to grab market share from dominant Chinese brands selling at much cheaper prices such as Oppo and Huawei in the sector. Apple’s global sales took a slight drop in Q2 2017 and 400,000 less iPhones were sold compared to the same period last year.

Apple Fails Indonesia

Apple and Samsung struggle to grab market share against Chinese brands. Source: Frontera

Apple recently opened its first official store, a “Town Square”, in Singapore last May.

Apple Fails Indonesia

Singapore’s first official Apple Town Square. Source: 9to5mac

This followed a commitment to invest more than $44 million in R&D in Indonesia after the company couldn’t release the iPhone 6s and 7 in the country for failing to meet the requirement of having at least 30% local components.

Indonesia not breaking the bank

Recent data from International Data Corporation (IDC) shows only 1% of 7.9 million smartphones shipped in Indonesia during Q2 2017 cost more than $600 or fell into the “ultra high-end” category.

Apple Fails in Indonesia

 

Devices from the “low-end” category costing $100 – $200 are still the most popular among Indonesians as they prefer a more affordable option.

In nascent markets like Indonesia, Chinese and local players like Huawei, Oppo, and Advan will continue to occupy the top five smartphone brands in the country.  

And given Apple’s newest price tags – the iPhone X initial pricing exceeding $1,000 – its share will unlikely exceed more than 1% of Indonesia’s total shipment anytime soon, unlike the US market where Apple has 31.3% market share.

But it’s not all doom and gloom for Apple. Indonesia’s consumer smartphone affinity is heading towards the higher end as purchasing power increases.

Mid-range devices costing between $200 – $400 grew to 28% from 13% in the same period last year and with the lowered iPhone SE price to the “midrange” category, it’s not impossible to see more iPhones in the hands of Indonesians.

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