Customer reviews matter for brands selling online. Studies have shown an increase of 161% in conversion rates when adding user generated product reviews.

Amazon of course has become the gold standard for high quality user generated reviews. Unfortunately for brands in Southeast Asia, getting customers to leave reviews is hard. Users don’t proactively write reviews and when they do, the content is short and not very helpful.

In this article, we’ll look at some of the brands that are doing well in terms of ratings and reviews on Lazada Thailand and identify some ways for other brands to get more quality reviews.

How do Ratings & Product Reviews help brands?

Ratings and product reviews help brands increase sales on marketplaces in three ways:

  1. Getting more traffic

Products reviews are basically user generated content on a brand’s product detail page. This content helps increase the ranking of that particular page on Google, therefore driving more offsite SEO traffic, leading to more sales.

In addition, higher ratings and more content also help the brand rank higher in terms of onsite search, i.e. users searching while on Lazada or Shopee.

  1. Increasing conversion rates

High ratings and positive, holistic user reviews also help increase conversion rates from the brand’s product detail page into checkout. Based on ecommerceIQ research, social proof or friend and family recommendations is a top 3 customer acquisition channel for marketplaces like Lazada and Shopee, demonstrating how important reviews are for conversions.

  1. Improve and defend brand equity

Marketplaces attract grey sellers. Genuine reviews from real users help distinguish your products from those of grey sellers or knock-off products.

Findings from our study

For our research, we looked at how the top brands that have an official shop-in-shop presence on Lazada Thailand perform in terms of ratings and reviews.

Specifically, we looked at and compared the below metrics. (Please note that you’ll be able to download the full data set with all these metrics by brand at the very end of this article. Click here to go there right now.) Please keep in mind that the ratings and reviews data was collected separately over a short period of time so minor discrepancies are to be expected.

  • Quantity:
    • Number of ratings
    • Number of reviews
    • Number of SKUs with at least one rating
    • Number of SKUs with at least one review
  • Quality:
    • % of SKUs with at least one rating
    • % of SKUs with at least one review
    • Number of ratings with at least 3 stars
    • Average rating
    • Average length of reviews (character count)

Based on the above metrics, we identified the following patterns and findings:

  • Top 18 official shop-in-shops are responsible for 80% of all the ratings (out of 161 official shop-in-shops tracked in this experiment)
  • Top 22 official shop-in-shops are responsible for 80% of all the reviews (out of 161 official shop-in-shops tracked in this experiment)
  • Average length of a review is 83 characters
    • This is how 83 characters looks like (short right?):

      “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula ege”

  • The top 3 categories with the most reviews are:
    • Health & Beauty (33,002 reviews, 46% of total)
    • Mother & Baby (23,970 reviews, 34% of total)
    • Bags & Travel (3,165 reviews, 4% of total)
  • The top 3 categories with the longest reviews are:
    • Health & Beauty (avg. 98 characters)
    • TV, Audio / Video, Gaming & Wearables (avg. 81 characters)
    • Mobiles & Tablets (avg. 76 characters)
  • The top 3 categories with the least reviews are:
    • Pet Supplies (7 reviews)
    • Sports & Outdoors (8 reviews)
    • Laundry & Cleaning (107 reviews)
  • The top 3 categories with the shortest reviews are:
    • Tools, DIY & Outdoor (avg. 37 characters)
    • Groceries (avg. 38 characters)
    • Cameras (avg. 45 characters)

Full table of data (best viewed on desktop or tablet)

Want do download the full Excel spreadsheet? Sign up here with your email and receive a download link.

Key Metrics By Category:

[table id=5 /]

Key Metrics By Brand:

[table id=6 /]

Full Raw Data:

[table id=7 /]

Want do download the full Excel spreadsheet? Sign up here with your email and receive a download link:

* indicates required



The fourth quarter is always the busiest season for retailers and brands across the world, Southeast Asia is no exception. The wave of mega sales typically observed offline during Black Friday in December have moved online thanks to prolific marketplaces like Amazon, Alibaba and Lazada. These campaigns now occur consecutively on 9.9, 11.11, and 12.12 (September 9th, November 11th, and December 12th) and cause headaches for brands new to ecommerce.

Businesses must plan ahead well in advance with multiple partners to hit their annual online revenue targets as up to 40% of GMV can be generated in the last three months of the year.

To help brands make the best of the shopping season, these are 10 strategies based on experience working with e-marketplaces, talking to ecommerce enablers, and data from some of the biggest brands across Southeast Asia.

While this guide is most applicable to enhancing performance during the upcoming “mega online sales campaigns” held by players like Lazada and Shopee in Southeast Asia, brands can increase chances to maximize sales and minimize costly mistakes with the findings.

Let’s dive right in.

1. Promotions & Merchandising

Getting this part right may sound trivial but it’s the main ingredient for a successful sales campaign. If the product offering clashes with offline deals and/or pricing is weak, no matter how much is spent on marketing, there will unlikely be high sales volumes

This is akin to achieving product-market fit prior to scaling your business.

So how should brands approach this? Well, what are brands trying to get out of these mega sales – revenues or general visibility/awareness?

In the case of the former, brands need to secure prime real estate on a marketplace such as the homepage or category page, which are typically allocated based on attractive discounts, online traffic and cash vouchers.

In order to drive revenue, exclusive “doorbuster” deals are especially important when top competitors – official and grey market sellers alike – selling similar or identical items are dropping prices.

Mass market brands are free to offer discounts, whereas premium market brands cannot use discounting as a viable strategy (channel conflict) and should look at adding value via bundling and exclusive GWP (Gift With Purchase). These tactics work well without having to tarnish the brand in the long-term.

In the case of visibility/awareness, more budget should be allocated to advertising and promotions to drive traffic to an upgraded shop-in-shop design to make a good first impression on new shoppers.

Brands can also utilize data tools to evaluate their positive in a competitive landscape (examples include BrandIQ) and benchmark competitor SKUs, promos and pricing ahead of the online sales festival.

ecommerce holiday strategies

BrandIQ Marketplace Analytics & Digital Shelf Monitoring

Planning and approval of the pricing strategy for end year – final list of SKUs, pricing, bundles and GWPs – will take the longest time. The brand then needs to share this plan ahead of a ‘freezing period’ to let marketplaces like Lazada and Shopee evaluate and approve the campaigns. And relative to the e-marketplaces other seller applications, it will allocate site visibility.

2. Inventory & Stock

Once SKUs and pricing is set, brands need to ensure there is enough physical stock to meet the forecasted demand.

This requires scrubbing historical data, if available, and use proxy data points like offline channel sales if not.

With a forecast in place, products are ordered and inbounding slots at partner or brand fulfillment centers are reserved and dedicated to online sales. This should all be completed at minimum two weeks in advance.

Lastly, brands should set up automatic ‘out of stock’ triggers to receive emails and SMS whenever a product sells out. This can also be applied strategically to competitor SKUs too through tools like BrandIQ – this allows ecommerce store managers to respond with targeted pricing promotions whenever a key competitor SKU runs out.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Price change triggers in BrandIQ

3. Traffic Acquisition

A common dilemma faced by brands during sales season is whether or not to double down on marketing spend.

CPCs (cost-per-clicks) are typically higher during a period when other brands are prioritizing and spending aggressively on marketing. The idea behind this is returns tend to be higher too because of higher conversion rates resulting from more competitive SKUs, pricing and bundles.

If a brand can afford it, it’s recommended to increase spending during the sales season. In addition, a “warm-up” or teaser campaign prior to the big launch is also recommended and actually required by marketplaces like Lazada.

Brands also perform better when leveraging an existing customer email database or mobile phone list or building them using formats like Facebook Lead Ads well before the shopping season, when CPCs are still relatively low.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Facebook Lead Ads to build up email database ahead of the sales season

With this targeted database, brands can drive traffic during the sales campaign by sending emails or SMS to the list with promo codes to be used online during targeted dates.

While barter deals are more effective for brands to gain better on-site visibility, it’s also recommended to allocate budget to marketplace paid ads such as Lazada Sponsored Products and Shopee My Ads. These ad formats are still affordable compared to Facebook and Google ads and help acquire users when they’re already in a shopping mindset. They also help brands stand out on category pages as well as competitor product detail pages.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee My Ads

But when multiple brands are fighting for the same site banner placements, exclusivity and doorbuster deals are prioritized by marketplaces over sponsored ads.

Beyond the typical Facebook and Google paid ads to drive traffic, brands can also look into non-conventional channels such as Quora Ads and Shopback. CPCs and CPAs (cost-per-acquisition) are often lower due to less competition.

4. Traffic Activation & Conversion

Driving traffic is not enough; they need to convert into sales. To do this, brands have several levers to pull.

First, upgrade to an official shop-in-shop format if not yet done already. Commission fees will increase but this format goes beyond just a badge as it improves product search ranks and peace of mind for shoppers worried about authentic goods.

Maybelline Official LazMall Shop-in-Shop on Lazada Thailand

High-conversion shop-in-shop layouts. Source: aCommerce Shop-in-Shop Design Gallery.

The typical customer journey on marketplaces goes from the shop-in-shop homepage → category pages → product detail pages (PDPs).

The product detail pages is where customers need to be incentivized to “add to cart”. PDP optimization requires descriptive and rich product titles, images, body content, etc.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA product detail page optimization

One important element of PDPs are customer ratings and reviews. Unfortunately, most reviews on marketplaces in Southeast Asia tend to be few and often, not very helpful. To acquire more high quality reviews, either connect the brand.com product reviews/ratings to the Lazada product page or if no brand.com exists, leverage tools such as ReviewIQ to generate more reviews for certain SKUs on Lazada and Shopee.

ecommerce holiday strategies

NIVEA customer reviews generated via ReviewIQ

Another driver for conversions is live chat offered by both Lazada and Shopee. This is a great opportunity to increase conversions, especially for more expensive or complex products that require product detail exchange between the buyer and the merchant.

With an estimated one-third of ecommerce transactions in Thailand happening through Instagram, Facebook and LINE, users have come to expect live chat in other B2C channels as well.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada Thailand live chat

ecommerce holiday strategies

Shopee live chat

For brands selling directly to customers via their own brand.com sites, an abandoned cart email should be active to regain lost revenue as well as retargeting pixels to drop cookies for a retargeting campaign during and right after the mega sales period.

5. Customer Service

From a CS perspective, brands need to prepare their customer service team on best-selling product details, pricing and overall campaign. In addition, having a master FAQ document or wiki that’s circulated ahead of time will allow CS teams or a dedicated agent to operate more efficiently during the campaign period.

If allowed, brands may want to scale up CS staff with temporary labor accounting for the increase in demand during the sales period. This should be tied back to the demand forecast. Platforms like Helpster in Thailand and Indonesia offer brands an easy way to quickly ramp up temporary staff.

6. Monitoring

A large and often negative impact on a brand’s performance online is the abundance of grey market sellers that undercut product prices.

As marketplaces aren’t incentivized to remove grey sellers selling authentic products and will only delist pirated goods, brands can only focus on improving their own product selection, search rank and educating its consumers on its official online channels.

In addition to raising concerns to the marketplace on removing counterfeit goods, brands can use BrandIQ to track grey market SKUs or other brands that impact its promotions, e.g. Mimi Poko vs. Mamy Poko:

ecommerce holiday strategies

Mimi Poko on Lazada Thailand

7. Packaging

Packaging seems mundane in comparison to the other sales levers but it’s a customer touch point to increase repurchase rates. In addition to an eye-pleasing design and quality of the packaging itself, promotions via flyers or vouchers to drive follow-up actions such as cross-sell and up-sell.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Pedigree box design

8. Fulfillment & Delivery

Customers value packages to be delivered in a quick and efficient manner.

ecommerce holiday strategies

Lazada customer chat with merchant complaining about expected delivery times.

For brands to succeed here in the last mile, we recommend the following:

  • Organize the warehouse set up at least one week ahead of time – reserved inbound, outbound slots – to ensure delivery to customers within SLA
  • Give the warehouse the estimated order volume factoring in marketing, promotions, and competition well ahead of time
  • Prepare enough packaging material such as carton boxes, bubble wrap, packing foam, etc. to meet forecasted demand
  • Align with 3PLs to ensure its capabilities to pick up and deliver packages given the high volume
  • Prepare an on-demand delivery resource in case of over-capacity, e.g. LINEMAN, Grab Delivery

9. Business Operations

Ecommerce is a cross-functional, team-based effort, especially during the mega sales period where tight-knit coordination is the difference between hitting record highs or dropping the ball:

  • Set up war room dedicated to a cross-functional team that manages all operations during the campaign period. Prepare food because it’s going to be long stretches of day and night and weekends as 9.9 and 11.11 both happen on Sunday
  • The team needs to proactively monitor active campaigns during the day to ensure everything is synced properly, e.g. stock, price, etc. and may even needs to reply quickly to customer chats if CS is overwhelmed
  • Marketing and store managers to check all campaign landing pages after launch. Last thing needed is money spent on driving traffic to 404 pages
  • Debrief / post-mortem for the next big sale (right around the corner)

10. Website Stability

To avoid mishaps such as Amazon’s very own Prime Day meltdown, these tips apply only if a brand is running its own brand.com site, not marketplace shop-in-shop:

  • 2-3 weeks prior to peak period, perform a load test (also known as a stress test) to determine the traffic limits of your existing infrastructure setup. This will arm you with the knowledge of server limits and determine benchmark for an upgrade
  • Upgrade server processing power and network bandwidth 24-48 hours ahead of campaign day to be able to handle the spike in traffic
  • Test promotions, for sanity and determine if any loopholes
  • Enforce a code freeze period (no deployments) to reduce the risk of introducing bugs from new features during or prior to peak period
  • Prior to, communicate to web support teams to be readily available and on standby for peak trading. Hope for the best, prepare for the worse

But regardless of the above, performance will be determined by the right online channel for your brand or product category. Based on ecommerceIQ research, Shopee is a preferred platform by consumers for female-oriented categories like fashion and mom and baby items, whereas Lazada is preferred for categories such as electronics and home appliances.

Sign up here to download a Holiday Flash Sale preparation report.

Brands without inhouse ecommerce capabilities tend to work with ecommerce enablers to optimize their online performance. Contact us for a free consulting session: hello@ecommerceIQ.asia

Chinese ecommerce platform JD is lesser known amongst international audiences, but its mid-annual 618 shopping festival generated almost $25 billion in gross merchandise value this past June. The company has a 33% share of China’s B2C ecommerce market and generates more direct revenues than Alibaba. Google’s latest $550 million strategic investment in the company is the latest in a series of partnerships JD has orchestrated, as it seeks to challenge Alibaba and Amazon for ecommerce dominance in both China and the rest of the world.

JD’s Direct Retailing Model Gives it a Strong Competitive Advantage

JD’s business model is distinct from that of Alibaba’s in that it is a direct retailer – meaning that it purchases inventory wholesale and sells products directly to individual customers, rather than simply acting as an intermediary between buyers and sellers. Approximately 92% of its business comes from direct sales, whereas for Amazon this figure hovers around 50%.

JD stocks its own inventory in its vast proprietary network of nearly 500 warehouses across China, each of which is situated strategically close to consumers to ensure fast delivery. JD also employs an in-house delivery force of over 65,000 warehousing and delivery workers. During the 618 festival this year, JD was able to deliver 90% of its goods within two days.

This dedication to customer service requires a significant amount of capital to sustain, but JD has been able to stand out from its competitors.

JD claws its way up to a 33% market share in an industry where Alibaba was previously thought to be unbeatable.

Richard Liu, CEO of JD.com delivering goods during their ‘618’ Mid Year Sales Source: Internet

The Borderless Retail Alliance

To compete with Alibaba, JD has enlisted the help of numerous partners. In China, this includes internet giants Tencent and Baidu, in addition to its partnerships with the likes of vertical-focused ecommerce platforms Vipshop and Meili Inc. Tencent owns 18% of JD’s shares and partnered with JD to invest $864 million in China’s third largest ecommerce platform Vipshop this past December. JD made its claim to fame by selling electronics to a predominantly male user base, and such partnerships with Vipshop and Meili, both of which sell a combination of apparel and cosmetics, help the company appeal to a broader female base.

America’s largest retailer Wal-Mart owns 10% of JD’s shares and has been a strategic partner since 2016 when it first sold its ecommerce division Yihaodian to JD Google, despite having a limited presence in the China market, announced a $550 million investment in JD this past June. Both of these strategic partnerships will be key as JD prepares to expand its business overseas.

Google’s Data Will Help JD Catch Up Overseas

Ecommerce platforms such as JD spend an enormous amount of money on search ads every year, to ensure that their products show up in search results. As they grow bigger, however, internet users can go directly to ecommerce platforms to search for products, which presents a threat to Baidu’s and Google’s search ads business. Partnering with JD allows Google to hedge against this problem.

Google’s extensive ecommerce data can give JD better insights into the buying behavior of users, and JD will have a better idea of how to target users via Google’s broad ads network. This will be a significant asset as it attempts to catch up with local competitors in Southeast Asia, Europe, and the US.

Wal-Mart and JD Make the Perfect Couple

US retail giant Wal-Mart has been partners with JD since 2016 when it sold its online business Yihaodian to JD in exchange for a 5% equity stake worth $1.5 billion. That stake has since grown to 10%. In China, Wal-Mart leverages JD’s marketplace and users to sell directly to Chinese consumers online, complementing its offline business in the country. For JD, Wal-Mart is a key supplier for the JD Daojia platform, which is an on-demand delivery service that delivers groceries to customers within a one-hour time frame.

JD also sells its goods offline in Wal-Mart stores and uses them as distribution centers from which last-mile delivery can be carried out. Since JD is an online retailer without many offline retail stores, the addition of Wal-Mart’s physical locations across China is a considerable asset as it looks to expand its user base via omnichannel marketing strategies. JD is planning to expand to the US market by the end of this year, and the potential expansion of this partnership model means that JD may have a chance to catch up with Amazon, especially since the two can leverage economies of scale and source goods in bulk.

JD Dao Jia partnered with Wal-Mart on sales promotion Source: Internet

JD Goes Global

With an impressive set of partnerships under its belt, JD has the capability to challenge Alibaba and, potentially Amazon, on the global stage. JD has already set up international ecommerce site Joybuy in Spain this year and is looking to expand to Germany. JD has also launched local websites in Thailand and Indonesia under the JD brand. JD has publicly announced its intention to enter the US market by the end of 2018, with a beachhead office located in Los Angeles. The company plans to undercut its competitors and also help Chinese brands like Xiaomi expand to the US.

While it is still early stages, what is certain is that JD’s global expansion will be very interesting to watch going forward.

Written by Don Zhao, Co-founder and Executive Director of Azoya