Mens sana in corpore sano.

The latin phrase means “a healthy mind in a healthy body”, and is a widely spread antidote in wellness communities, but how much of the population actually devotes time to exercise on a regular basis? And is it even a priority in developing countries?

To understand the attitude towards fitness in Indonesia, ecommerceIQ surveyed 30 young Jakartans, ages 20 to 35 years old, about their habits. 73 percent of respondents said they didn’t participate in sports and/or fitness regularly due to busy work schedules (22) and 23 percent claimed to be too shy to do fitness or sports alone (7). A single respondent didn’t know how to exercise.

An Indonesian booking platform named DOOgether aims to change the attitude of urban Indonesians and help them overcome common obstacles like the mentioned above for not exercising. The startup connects sports enthusiasts in Greater Jakarta with a database of over 80-100 fitness studios, gyms and sport centers offering zumba and basketball.

The company will be capturing a piece of the Indonesia fitness services market estimated to reach revenues of approximately USD$298 million by 2020.  

“Essentially DOOgether is a community that enables people to book sports activities that suit their schedules and also encourage beginners to try new activities,” says Fauzan Gani, CEO and co-founder of DOOgether.

“Based on last year’s performance, we believe we can convince more studios to list on our platform as we see a rise in fitness awareness among Indonesians.”

The startup was founded in 2016 by Fauzan and his friend Helmy Ikhsan, now COO of DOOgether, after their own difficulty finding suitable sports classes in Jakarta. It was a stark contrast to their university days in Australia.

“Helmy and I were discussing the headache of booking the right sport venue near,” shares Fauzan. “We decided to solve our own problem.”

Introducing Itself to Jakartans

In December 2016, the startup closed an undisclosed amount of seed funding from Indonesian businessman and chairman of Inter Milan, Erick Thohir, after bootstrapping from day one.

Having money meant aggressively launching on mobile through both an iOS and Android app less than one year later to reach more users. By working with fitness influencers in Indonesia, the company was also able to build a strong social media following and invite the masses to its trademark offline event like DOOday.

The full day event, held 2-3 times a month, invites all users to participate in a unique themed activity such as yoga on top of a helipad or combining mini-soccer and zumba.

One of DOOgether’s trademark offline event DOOday.

An average of 50 participants attend for smaller scale events offer zumba and yoga and 240 participants for larger scale events like mini soccer cups or basketball competitions.

Speaking with ecommerceIQ, Fauzan says the company’s focus is more on offline to acquire and educate Indonesians about the benefits of fitness. For the founder, these offline touchpoints are crucial for an early stage startup to promote its platform and build a community.

Are Indonesians ready to get active?

The startup appears to compete with popular subscription based fitness apps like Singapore-based GuavaPass, but Fauzan doesn’t consider the company as a competitor.

“What GuavaPass offers is membership with a monthly fee of roughly IDR 1 million (USD$75.20). We offer flexible classes on a pay as you go model. Our biggest competitor is how users spend their time doing anything but going to the gym like being stuck in traffic or hanging out at the movies,” laughs Fauzan.

BMI Research predicts that spending on sports, camping and open-air recreational activities in Indonesia will grow by an average of 11.6 percent year on year with the market forecast at IDR 3.8 trillion in 2021, up from 2.5 trillion IDR (USD$186 million) in 2017.

Strong growth in spending on sports and outdoor activities in Indonesia (IDR billion) and IDR % y-o-y growth). Graphic credit: BMI Research/ National Bureau of Statistics

The increased spending on outdoor activities seems to correlate with the growing population of young adults (20-35 years old) in the country – 1.45 million in 2017 to roughly 86 million by 2021. The hyper marketed Asian Games 2018 set to start in August will also increase the interest in fitness.

Growing young adults segment to drive sports spending of young adults in Indonesia (20 – 39 years old), ‘000 Graphic credit: BMI Research/ UN

By the end of December 2017, DOOgether claimed to offer more than 100 fitness studio and gym partners, with available to be booked more than 3,000 classes per month. Fauzan believes that in 2018, DOOgether can double its numbers.

But before the company can serve more users in Indonesia, it will need to solve a few bugs with its technology. During the interview, Fauzan noted that his team is currently working to improve the interface to help users find information more easily on its mobile application.

Fauzan strongly believes that for DOOgether to become a one-stop sport platform, it needs to value feedback from its users and always be hungry for more.

“We will continue to focus on being the biggest sports platform and ecosystem in Indonesia. The country is filled with over 250 million people and anyone can love sports, whether it is an individual or a team activity,” said Fauzan.

We hope to bring the entire industry together and help Indonesians be healthier in just one click.”

Millennials are shaking up the travel industry with their penchant for authentic, unique experiences and Muslims are no exception to this rule. The size of the Halal travel industry is expected to skyrocket with more millennials entering the workforce and pocketing greater disposable incomes.

That’s one of the key takeaways of “Halal Travel Frontier 2018”, an industry report published by Crescent Rating in conjunction with MasterCard.

Crescent Rating, which first started analyzing the Muslim travel market in 2008, says that there were an estimated 126 million Muslim travelers in 2016. The number is expected to grow by nearly 30% in the next four years, settling on 156 million travelers in 2020.

In 2015, Crescent Rating estimated total purchases by Muslim travelers to be roughly US$145 billion. This factors in expenditure on Halal food, hotels, excursions & experiences, and shopping. The number is expected to rise to a colossal US$300 billion by 2026 – more than doubling in volume in a little over a decade.

A large chunk of this growth is fueled by millennial Muslim travelers in the fast-growing economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, Turkey, and Gulf countries. 60% of the population in Muslim majority countries is currently under the age of 30 – a stark contrast to the global average, which is 11%.

It’s a demographic that players in the travel & tourism space simply cannot afford to ignore anymore.

“Brands would also need to increase their level of empathy and find new ways to better connect with Muslim travelers,” explains Fazal Behardeen, CEO of Crescent Rating. “This will be key in order to both appeal and empower their Muslim travelers.”

What are Muslim millennials looking for?

One of the seminal insights proffered by Crescent Rating is the emergence of the Muslim female travel segment. This particular demographic is gradually becoming a force in its own right with females opting to travel with their friends & family in small to medium-sized groups.

The key purchasing factors for such consumers are “specialized travel products and lifestyle services.” Destinations looking to attract female Muslim travelers are advised to engender a safe and accessible environment that respects the cultural and religious sensitivities at play.

South Africa and Indonesia are tipped to be major travel destinations for Muslims, but Asia as a whole is expected to eat up the largest chunk. The Indonesian government itself has set up an ambitious target of attracting 5 million Halal travelers in 2019, more than double the 2 million that visited in 2016. Other popular destinations are Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore.

Sporting events in Asia such as the Winter Olympics in South Korea this year as well as the Tokyo Summer Olympics in 2020 are also expected to court significant numbers of travelers from Muslim-majority countries.

Outbound travel markets. Photo credit: Crescent Rating

The potential is undeniable. How can brands cash in?

Muslim travelers tend to weigh in specific factors before reaching a firm decision on a travel destination, according to Crescent Rating. There should be facilities that allow for accessible prayer areas, restaurants & cafes serving certified Halal food, and toilets with provision for ablution. Most travelers will flock to social media or do extensive research on the web prior to embarking on their journey.

At the same time, governments also have an opportunity to help local businesses by offering prayer facilities and Halal food in public locations like airports, railway stations, and places of interest. Taiwan is cited as an example of a country actively working to meet this demand.

Like millennials around the world, Muslim travelers will likely start their buyer’s journey on the web by searching for travel content but most mainstream sites – Booking.com and Agoda, for example – don’t have dedicated listings for Halal-friendly establishments or significant insights on where Muslims might feel comfortable.

“We find that Muslim millennial travelers are like most millennial travelers apart from their uncompromising faith-based needs,” explains Raudha Zaini, marketing manager at Halal Trip, a B2C travel portal for Muslims. “They seek what we call the 3As when they travel – Authentic Experience, Affordable Facilities and Accessible Network – all within the radius of their faith requirements.”

According to the Pew Research Center, the Muslim demographic around the world is expected to grow twice as fast as the overall world population between 2015 to 2060, reaching a projected 3 billion individuals. In terms of consumer spending alone, the global Islamic economy generated US$1.9 trillion in food and lifestyle expenditure in 2015 with projections that it’ll grow significantly to US$3 trillion by 2021.

For brands looking to appeal to a gargantuan demographic hiding in plain sight, they’ll have to focus on crafting their message and developing empathy. That’s key if they’re looking to connect with young Muslims on a personal level. One thing for sure is that the market will continue to expand at a ferocious rate.

So far the rate of adoption has been slow, at best. UK-based retailer Marks & Spencer launched a burkini swimwear collection in 2016 to a spurt of criticism. Despite dissenting voices, the line completely sold out showing there’s real demand.

Other examples are the 2017 launch of the four-star Al-Meroz hotel in Bangkok, the first Halal hotel in Thailand as well as Expedia’s US$350 million in Indonesian online travel platform Traveloka the same year.

But these are tepid responses to a market valued at hundreds of billions. Larger brands can, and should step up to match smaller incumbents like Indonesian halal cosmetics company Wardah, India’s IbaHalalCare, and California-based AmaraCosmetics.

Given the proximity of Southeast Asia’s markets, consumer behavior and preferences across the region are expected to be relatively similar but brands present in multiple markets can contest that there are several differences between the countries. It behooves brands to prioritize customer feedback.

As there is no perfect product, there are hundreds and thousands of good and bad reviews floating around the web and its important to not weigh them equally. To add value to customers and merchants, online platforms like Lazada mark quality reviews with a badge to verify the purchase of the item by the user.

Reviewer with a purchase history of the SKU is verified on Lazada and identified with a badge. Source: Lazada Indonesia.

Top: Fully recommended! I’ve been using hyper glossy for over four years, there’s nothing as comfortable as this one, even though I have tried using other eyeliner products from Maybelline or other brands, I’m still loyal to this one. Very waterproof, long lasting. By the way, the packaging is very safe, tidy with layered bubble wrap and fast delivery. I’m very satisfied with the service from Maybelline Indonesia.

Bottom: Satisfied. The eyeliner was delivered yesterday, 3-days delivery. Good waterproof eyeliner, people who said it [the product] is small probably never bought Maybelline eyeliner before. It’s small but it could last five months.

Data-analytics platform BrandIQ compares feedback habits of customers on Lazada Indonesia and Lazada Thailand for brands in the Beauty & Health category to understand which markets are more satisfied with the same products.

Beauty shoppers Indonesia Thailand

Customers on Lazada Indonesia leave more than three times the number of reciews on the platform than customers on Lazada Thailand.

Not only did BrandIQ find that Lazada Indonesia had more than three times the number of reviews on Lazada Thailand in the Beauty & Health category, there were also more verified reviews.

The number becomes even more interesting when factoring in total SKUs on Lazada Thailand is two times more than on Lazada Indonesia, 2,136,259 and 1,278,324 respectively (as per January 11).

Looking at the reviews for four beauty brands with presence on both Lazada Indonesia and Lazada Thailand — L’Oreal Paris, Maybelline, Garnier, and Nivea — showed that although Thais left less reviews, they reported more positive things about their purchase than Indonesians.

By filtering for positive keywords such as ‘good’, ‘fabulous’, ‘amazing’, and negative keywords like ‘bad’ and ‘terrible’, BrandIQ is able to determine the overall customer sentiment for a brand’s products on a marketplace.

One keyword that appears most often on Lazada Thailand is ‘สีสวย’ or ‘nice color’, appearing in 12.47% out of all the Beauty and Health category reviews.

While on Lazada Indonesia, keywords like ‘tidak sesuai’ or ‘doesn’t fit’ showed up the most in reviews with negative sentiment in the same category.

Beauty shoppers Indonesia Thailand

Reviews from Maybelline customers in Lazada Thailand and Indonesia with the most popular keywords for each sentiments respectively.

Top: Nice color. The color is long lasting, nice color, and it’s 50% off! Super awesome.

Bottom: Two stars. Good product, only the color doesn’t look like the picture.

What does this mean for brands?

Although all customer feedback is important for brands, the ability to distinguish verified reviewers – those who have purchased – over random or spam users will give companies a more credible overview of how well received their products are in different markets.

Using Maybelline reviews as an example, Indonesians tend to leave more product reviews and appear less satisfied than their Thai counterparts, making it beneficial for Maybelline to either modify their product selection and/or address the complaints.


HOW IS YOUR BRAND PERFORMING ON SOUTHEAST ASIA’S TOP MARKETPLACE?

The Background

Back in 1851, a small apothecary was established in the neighborhood of East Village, New York by John Kiehl. Breaking away from typical drug stores that offered common compounds and nostrums prepared onsite, John chose to open a store that focused on essentials oils, homeopathic and herbal remedies to achieve his objective — keeping the local community happy, healthy, and feeling their best.

The apothecary remained in the family for 70 years until it was purchased by Kiehl’s apprentice, Irving Morse, in 1921 before his son, Aaron Morse, took over in 1950 and added grooming products for men and women to the brand’s product line.

Aaron was also the one who introduced free samples to customers and is still practiced at today’s global cosmetics powerhouse Kiehl’s.

More than 12 million Kiehl’s sample packets and tubes are given away each year.

Fast-forward to 2000, Aaron’s daughter Jami Morse Heidegger decided to sell the business she inherited to L’Oreal for approximately $100 million. The brand had become immensely popular among fashion enthusiasts and skin-care connoisseurs worldwide and impossible for her to continue managing.

“It was like a snowball rolling downhill and just getting bigger and bigger. I created something I couldn’t control” – Jami Morse Heidegger

Jami Morse Heidegger, third-generation Kiehl’s heiress and her husband, Klaus Heidegger
Source: Retrouve

After being acquired by one of the largest cosmetics companies in the world, Kiehl’s expanded to 2,000 locations in 61 countries and was well on its way to the top of the beauty industry. What could go wrong?

The Challenge

Jami always feared her business would become a brand fighting for money, attention and space.

The thought of selling her business to L’Oreal didn’t appeal to her at first because L’Oreal had a reputation in building mass brands like Maybelline and had never managed a niche, boutique brand before.

But after it grew to a size she could no longer handle, she had no choice but to hand the brand over to a corporate looking to compete in the burgeoning specialty market.

Kiehl’s was afraid that under the management of L’Oreal, consumers would no longer view the store as independent and cutting-edge but rather as a revenue-generating corporate machine.

“[The challenge is] to grow and export the Kiehl’s way without changing it. We soon realized that we needed to stick as closely as possible to our business model on a global basis, to create a consistent Kiehl’s experience around the world,” said Kiehl’s General Manager Worldwide, Cheryl Vitali.

How were they going to keep a tight leash on L’Oreal?

Inside Kiehl’s apothecary during its early days. Source: Yahoo

The Strategy

The company didn’t want a flashy marketing budget or fancy model to be representing its brand.

“We want to keep the line [Kiehl’s] very exclusive,” said L’Oreal USA’s former chief executive, Guy Peyrelongue.

In order to appease the wishes of the Kiehl’s family, L’Oreal maintained the brand’s identity and its distribution model while ensuring its stores around the world matched the look and feel of the original apothecary in East Village.

Kiehl’s was on a mission to set strict brand boundaries for consistency and product control. And it worked.

Any one that has ever stepped into a Kiehl’s apothecary will recognize the iconic skeleton, Mr Bones, next to the famous Harley Davidson motorcycle.

“The motorcycles entertained the guys while the ladies shopped — and it was also a very clever way to introduce Kiehl’s men’s products to them,” – Chris Salgardo, president of Kiehl’s USA

Kiehl’s shops around the world look almost identical thanks to the brand’s strict guidelines. Source: Marie Claire

The brand also spends heavily on the development of products and ingredients, almost 3 to 5 times more than competitors. Its contribution to multiple charitable efforts also proved to be a successful way to hook customers to not only buy for themselves, but also feel proud to gift Kiehl’s products.

In Thailand, Kiehl’s introduced the country’s first ambassador and offered free samples together with a 5-minute consultation. Source: mThai

The company’s success in the US made global expansion a next natural step. In line with L’Oreal’s focus on digital marketing and ecommerce to capitalise growing consumption, Kiehl’s went online.

“It [online] enables us to get to know our customers better and interact more effectively with them, while remaining true to the brand’s rebellious and offbeat style” – Cheryl Vitali

By 2013, Asia had topped global sales of natural personal care products. The popularity of natural products was driven by major economic changes and rise in disposable incomes, especially among the Chinese, who had become more health-conscious.

The chart shows the sales of natural personal care products by region in 2013; Asia is the leader in sales. Source: Kiline Group

Southeast Asia also displayed the highest-growing demand for beauty and personal care causing Kiehl’s to invest heavily in performance marketing and its website with the help of ecommerce enabler and e-distributor aCommerce.

Beauty and personal care is expected to grow the most in Asia Pacific from 2016-2021. Source: Euromonitor

A fear many brand managers face is consistency across channels. How do I ensure the brand is rightfully represented at all customer touchpoints?

In the case of Kiehl’s, the company successfully projected its edgy and young vibes through bright colors and flashy images on its website in Thailand and Indonesia.

Kiehl’s website was localised for Indonesian customers.

The brand preserves its mission to make each and everyone of its customers feel good by utilizing technology. Kiehl’s recently implemented artificial intelligence and a text messaging model in its stores and online to keep customers engaged and taken care of.

“We’ve learned the first purchase happens in store, and online we’ve created tools to extend services to make a cycle,” Julia Mavrodin, Kiehl’s associate vice president of e-commerce and digital marketing said.

Through historical data collected from online orders, Kiehl’s can accurately estimate when a customer will run out of an eye cream or facial cleanser and send a text message to prompt the customer to order a new one.

A sample text message that Kiehl’s sets to keep their customers replenished with its goods. Source: Digiday

By introducing a direct channel to converse with customers, the brand is able to track where and when customers buy its products, even at partner retailers like Sephora or Nordstrom.

This allows the brand to stay top of mind and shield customers from buying unauthorized products off of e-marketplace like Amazon at the same time.

To this day, Kiehl’s has remained one of L’Oreal’s fastest growing brands and broke the symbolic $1 billion sales mark in 2016.

The Future

Kiehl’s is looking to capitalise on its brand power in new markets like the Middle East and Latin America to ultimately spread the brand’s legacy and become the number one skincare brand in the world.

“To get there we will need to pay even closer attention to our customers. After all, that has been the secret of our success for the last 160 years.”

In a not-so-shocking move last month, retail giant Target acquired a grocery delivery startup for more than half a billion dollars to better compete with Amazon in the US.

Given the latter’s influence on the state of retail over the last decade, there has been a wave of excitement and fear sweeping the industry on a global scale.

The gradual consumer preference for digital has forced traditional businesses, predominantly in developed markets, to restructure internally or shut down. Case examples include retail leaders Macy’s, Sears, and American Apparel, whose legacies are now read about in bankruptcy stories.

Today’s headlines are revealing retail behemoths getting pushed to a corner by a new breed of entrants shaking up the retail status quo with business models revolving around ecommerce, omni-channel, click and collect. These new companies also tend to execute faster, reach further and understand how to utilize the goldmine that is the internet.

But understanding that “digital disruption” or “retail innovation” is needed within a traditional corporation isn’t merely enough to bring about real change.

The speed at which businesses incorporate digital channels will determine their chances at survival and relevancy to the next generation of consumers.

But by the time they come around to asking, “am I moving fast enough to catch up to my competitors?”

It’s already too late.

Shopping sprees in the West

Companies in the US felt heat from the Amazon Effect much earlier than India or Southeast Asia did, ensuing panic in direct competitors like Walmart, Target and Home Depot and forcing them to act quickly.

In the last two years alone, large corporations like the above invested over $5 billion in acquiring digital companies to beef up their portfolios.

While most of these companies have the capacity to carve out resources to build their own ecommerce operations in house, the pace at which the internet industry moves doesn’t wait for employees to learn “Digital 101”.

Not to mention the additional pain points such as internal resistance, lack of ecommerce talent and channel conflicts. Large corporations in general tend to struggle when venturing outside of their core competencies. The quickest way to patch up your business is to buy what you don’t have.

In regards to Walmart’s total $4 billion acquisition spree,

“Walmart is buying a new consumer base — upper-middle-class people who normally wouldn’t shop at Walmart — and these new relationships would bring higher margins.” — Jim Cusson, president of retail branding agency Theory House

And the “buy what you don’t have” trend is prevalent across the industry as more traditional players gobble up digital startups. In the last eight months alone,

Walmart [retailer]: acquires Bonobos for $310 million in cash and last mile delivery startup Parcel
Sodexo [food management]: acquires majority stake in Paris-based online restaurant and food delivery startup FoodCheri
Home Depot [retailer]: acquires online business of retailer of textiles and home decor products The Company Store
FTD [flower delivery giant]: acquires on-demand flower startup BloomThat
Target [retailer]: acquires same-day delivery startup Shipt
Luxico [luxury home rentals]: acquires US-based text messaging platform for hotels Hello Scout
Albertsons [grocery retailer]: acquires meal kit company Plated
McKesson Canada [healthcare supply chain]: acquires marketplace for natural healthcare and beauty products Well.ca

“Quality exits like this don’t stem from a ‘for sale’ sign tacked to the door.” – Chris Arsenault, board member at Well.ca

Of course, the enormous price tags of these acquisitions could be spent on buffing up the in-store experience but the returns would take a long time to see whereas Target’s own online sales growth from Q1 2015 to Q3 2017 show how successful the company has been able to leverage ecommerce.

Target ecommerce growth from 2015 to 2017. Source: Bloomberg

While an acquisition may seem like a quick, easy solution, there are numerous factors to consider to avoid backlash such as price point adjustments and consistent branding. Without understanding how digital can compliment the current business model, it’s likely the new asset will simmer and die in a couple of years. Simply put, don’t buy ecommerce for ecommerce sake.

Absorbing a digital company on the other hand brings about mountains of data, new customers, a solid brand, fresh talent and a seat at the hippest place where everyone hangs out, the internet.

Movement in the ASEAN region

As with most trends, they eventually infiltrate markets on a global scale and Southeast Asia is no exception. Even a couple of years before Amazon’s lackluster entry in Singapore, a few traditional retailers took the acquisition route to capture digital opportunity early.

Sephora bought online beauty retailer Luxola in 2015, Central Group acquired fashion e-tailer Zalora Thailand in 2016 and last year announced a joint venture with Chinese internet giant JD.com.

What has driven this flurry of activity by corporations across the world?

It is avoiding what Jeff Bezos describes as “Day 2”. An idea explained nicely by Bezos in his letter to stakeholders:

“Day 2 is stasis. Followed by irrelevance. Followed by excruciating, painful decline. Followed by death. And that is why it is always Day 1. To be sure, this kind of decline would happen in extreme slow motion. An established company might harvest Day 2 for decades, but the final result would still come.” – Jeff Bezos

Which day does your company operate in?

All aspects of ecommerce can be controlled by a brand, except for one area that is completely in the hands of the user – product reviews and ratings.

As competition grows on marketplace, where most online customers start their purchasing journey, this aspect has become a reliable filter to help other users decide, “to buy or not to buy.”

On most ecommerce sites, customers can sort products from highest to lowest average ratings, which means a high score gives brands more visibility and a competitive advantage over competitors. Better product rating, better purchase rate, makes sense right?

But five stars alone isn’t enough to convince customers to add to cart, it’s what the reviews are saying that drive checkouts, especially in Asia where an average of 22% customers — the highest globally — count online reviews as a decision making factor due to the strong effect of community.

By aggregating the major consensus of what customers are saying in their reviews, brands can leverage reviews to improve their performance online. How can this be done?

customers review Unilever

Data-analytics platform BrandIQ has collected reviews for four of Unilever’s brands – Dove, Rexona, Simple, Toni and Guy – on Lazada Philippines to showcase what companies can learn from this set of data and separating out the generic complaints (i.e. slow delivery, average product).

The average rating of each brand online gives a high level glance at which brand needs more monitoring and brand building. For example, Toni and Guy scores an average 3.81/5, which isn’t necessarily bad, but can be improved to rank higher in search.

42% of total reviews scrubbed were about the touch and feel of the products, but approximately 58% actually shed light on aspects other than product quality.

What were they saying?

To sort the data, reviews are split into five main categories: Product, General, Delivery, Packaging, and Customer Service.

customers review Unilever

From the data above, the keyword “delivery” is the second most quoted in reviews, but it doesn’t reveal whether sentiment is good or bad.

By splitting customer reviews into two sentiments: positive and negative, we identify the strengths and weaknesses of these categories. This allows companies to understand which area should be prioritised for improvement.

For Unilever brands on Lazada Philippines, despite the small numbers of reviews that talk about Package, the category racked up a strong positive sentiment compared to the other four categories (Service contributes only a small percentage of the total reviews). Extrapolation of this data can signal that the products ordered by customers is well taken care of during the last mile with the packaging the company used.

customers review Unilever

customers review Unilever

Review left by a Dove customer on Lazada PH that was found helpful by at least six other customers.

Customer reviews are a unique and vital aspect to ecommerce that offline retail rarely had to face before. Brands looking to crack the code on e-marketplaces will need to build an understanding for this new metric, and use it as a tool to their advantage.


HOW IS YOUR BRAND PERFORMING ON SOUTHEAST ASIA’S TOP MARKETPLACES?